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>> Home > Tags > pt boat

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Decks by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
Hi Norm, Norm (!) Oughs drawing may well be 'as built'. During the war she received many mods. Depends on the time snapshot you want to recreate. I may be wrong about the island (photo perspective) but it seemed that way. I remember standing on the topmost island deck of a Colossus class carrier, at the foot of the antenna mast, looking down at ants crawling about on the deck, and the even smaller ones on the dockside! 😉 I was up there inspecting the COMMS antenna fit. That was my job the last 30 odd years. On existing ships I would survey the COMMS systems for upgrades and refits. For new build ships I would discuss the requirements and possibilities with the navies and then discuss with the shipyards how to achieve them! All good stuff, but the last 10 years I was getting a bit stiff for the climbing, so I sent a younger colleague up while I discussed the existing system and any problems with the crew in the Wardroom😉 Can't see your pic, the site only accepts jpgs etc🤔 An irritation that has often cost me time to do conversions 😡 We'll have to 'gang up' on Fireboat (Stephen) to get this improved. i often wanted to upload a pdf page, but had to convert to jpg etc first😭 Where is this mysterious platform? Maybe I can find it. A large searchlight would not surprise me. Could also be an early radar antenna, need to research the types mentioned above. If the launch has a cabin it may be an 'Admirals Barge', and Admirals had a lot of freedom to paint them how they wanted. So black and mahogany sounds very appropriate to me 👍 Often said on this site (and elsewhere) but: 'The only silly question is the one you don't ask'! Keep up the good work, Doug 😎

pt 109 by basilsdad Petty Officer   Posted: 5 days ago
a 30"scratch built pt. boat, I built hull from .8mm ply using a resized eezebilt 20" plan. the deck fittings were copied as best as I could from photos and drawings found on line. powered by 2- 2200kv brushless out runner motors through 2 20 amp speed controllers. twin contra rotating props twin rudders fast and light a pleasure to build 2

Decks by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
Starboard side! Photo from 1940. Same square platform for antenna mast maintenance, with same railed deck above. Same round platform behind that (as you already have built) with what looks like a single 40mm or 20mm? Single barrel but shorter than the 40 up front! Then nothing except gantry deck until aft end of the island; then antenna mast mount, boat deck and crane, antenna mast, then some small AA 1x40 and 2 twin 20s?, director, searchlight, antenna mast, then 2x 4.5s. also a close up pic of port fwd. 40mm mount and battle damage! All for now👍 Good night from Munich 😎

ESC POWER by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
Hi rolfman Your quadcopters use forward only escs. I suspect the problem with model boat escs is the reverse. I don't have the circuit diagrams for ESCs so its difficult to be certain what causes the problem. I do know some escs with bec and switches work without being switched on if connected to a signal and power supply but subsequently fail usually with the full forward either on or off. Not all escs exhibit this which is why I asked what esc was being used. Trillium You are correct and is another reason I advised against this suggestion. dave

Sea Queen refurbishment by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Sorry for delay answering but my broadband died. Well the consistency I used was like normal liquid paint / pouring cream. Bit messy but good results, kept workshop at 30 degrees c. The object of this job is to restore an otherwise dead boat built by my dad in the late 1950s. Although a bit heavier it isn't going to be used except on special occasions. And will be handed down to my grandson in due coarse.

Aerokits P.T Boat by Rookysailor Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Boaty, Have a look on Ebay, there is a seller called 'Bellcrank', who does the planes and templates for all the parts of an Aerokits PT boat, and all the other aerokits range. rookysailor

Midwest Cranberry Isle by Grandpa Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
[Score: 8/10] 36" Midwest Cranberry Isle Single Propellor (3 Blade) Direct Drive Powered by NiMH (7.2v) Batteries - Comments: Recently purchased this boat built by Don Sutton, Scale Captain, Metro Modellers Toronto, Canada 🇨🇦. Don built the boat about 15 years ago, but to make room for a larger new model he is selling older models. This style of Yacht has long been a favourite of mine which will be my winter scratch build project. Having this working model in my workshop will assist me with the project.

Bring & Buy Sale by ColinT Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
24th September 2017 Mutual model Boat Society Grand Modellers Bring & Buy Sale Crimble croft Community Centre Aspinal Street, Heywood, Manchester OL10 4HL Come along and enjoy this famous event, Either to sell or purchase your supplies There are always lots of unusual bargains to be had Opening time for sales 09.30am Opening time for traders 08.300am Food available from 09.00am Closing time 1.00pm The whole site is wheel chair friendly Admission £1.50 includes a raffle ticket To Reserve a sellers Table, 6ft x 2ft =£10.00 Please contact Kevan Winward 07803 975089

As of Summer 2017... by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
After the sail, I added some hardware to the spars, namely jackstays. I also ordered some aircraft plywood and used it to make new winch drums. These are sized to my current plan of only bracing the tops'l yards. Hopefully, this is the last set I'll have to make. Seeing into the dark interior of the hull can be a pain, more so the brighter it is outside. Mark got some red LEDs to light up the dash of his old pick-up (ute for my Assie friends) and gave me a left-over section. It requires a 12 volt supply (I'm running 6) and red doesn't really help in daylight, but I like the idea. If I can find a white LED strip that'll run on 6 volts, this will definitely get put in. The stern also had folding bulwarks like the bow, but that wrapped all the way around. On the real ship these were replace with a fixed bulwark except for a couple of panels that allowed access to the stern boat. By the time the ship came to Baltimore in 1955, these too were gone, with all their hardware. Again, I'm not making them functional, and decided to built these on the model rather than as separate pieces like on the bow. The hinges are represented inboard by card stock and brass eyes. The barrel portion of the hinges outboard at the bottom of each panel will be a little section of 1/16" wood dowel. The forward bulwarks were epoxied in place and the support rods were installed all around. The tops are raw because they all get a bright cap rail (varnished natural wood) and I'll put that on when it won't get messed up with paint or glue. A friend sent me a box of stuff, among which was a nive little cat face perfect for my catheads. Only having one, I was going to cast a pair in resin. But I'm out of casting resin and epoxy glue didn't set up in a way I liked, so we'll come back to that. The tops'l yards on the ship are hinged iron bands, line with wood staves. I wanted to replicate that functionality not only because that's what the ship has, but because it would allow me to take them off the mast without unrigging half the ship. I cut some heavy copper I use for everything and bent it into two half circles; soldiered brass tubing to the ends, and sawed out the notches with a jewelers saw. If only it had been that easy. Soldiering here tended to un-soldier there, cold soldier joints wouldn't hold. I gave up in frustration. I changed the gun carriages based on some research I did, but I'll post separate entries dealing with them and the ship's boats. I went looking for information on soldiering little things, and took another whack at the parrels. This time it worked out much better. I reused the copper band and brass tubing for the main and made the fore the same way. I still have to make the mizzen tops'l yard parrel, but my soldiering has gotten much much better. Last May ('17) I took the boat to the Baltimore Port Expo for National Maritime Day again, surrounded by members of our newly formed White Rocks Model Boat Club. I didn't manage to get her controls set-up in time, so she didn't go in the pool, but sat on her cart and looked pretty. I put her courses and trys'ls on her for this. The trys'ls won't be used when she sails, but can be set for static displays. The courses will get used, but I'll be able to buntl them up as shown to reduce sail. Also to reduce sail, the t'gallants and royals will be easily removable, or replaceable, as the case may be, depending on what wind there is. That pretty much brings us up to date as of July 2017. I'll post something about the boats and guns in a bit, as well as any other progress that's made. There's far more detail, images, and notes at my website on this, and the other models I'm working on at: http://todd.mainecav.org/model/ There's a few items I skimmed, or skipped over, like her signal flags, that are covered in detail there; like the day she was almost dismasted by the garage door.

Best Tx systems for boats by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi All, don't think that that is quite what Nick meant! Most TX/RX sets nowadays are full of tricks and mixers for the fly boys; first setup question: 'Fixed wing or rotary?' for example! So - Nick: essentially it doesn't matter what you use (except the 35MHz rule of course!) but modifying all the aircraft mixer routines to suit boats is not for the faint hearted or novice. Therefore for your purposes I would recommend a relatively simple 2 to 4 channel set intended for trucks and cars. That gives you the basic control functions, including motor reverse, plus possibility to control a few specials, lighting or sound (horns) for instance. 2.4GHz is the future, but not without it's own pitfalls, as you've already discovered 🤔 I still use my old MC-10 40MHz set; - a) Cos it still works 👍😉 b) It's quick to set up for trials of a new boat or function, 👍 c) the more people move to 2.4GHz the less chance I have of getting any interference! 👍😊 (I have several TX/RX crystal sets anyway 😊 Bought up anything I could find locally the last few years) d) One of my models is a submarine! e) It can also store the setup configuration for 20 models. 👍 f) has no binding rigmarole. 👍👍 Cheers and very happy modelling / sailing, Doug 😎

The Big Heavy Model Boat Launching Blues by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Fully set up, I'm guessing Constellation weights between 100 and 110 pounds (I haven't had the opportunity the get an accurate measurement yet). Taking her to events with pools requires lifting her into the pool. I haven't figured out a way to do that easily, or safely, or more importantly, alone. I built her to sail in open water, so the 2 or three times I have to ask for help at a pool isn't a big deal. I'm sure that most of the time I'll be launching her at a ramp or shoreline, and that I'll need to move her from the parking area to the shoreline, however far that may be. There's times I may be faced with a bulkhead, but like the pool, there's no easy fix for that with a model this size. My first plan was a hand-truck set-up like the picture of my friend Ray from RCGroups, and his SC&H model of Surprise, a very similarly sized model to mine. The hand-truck is plastic and the cradle is wood, and you can see it's pretty bulky to hold a 100 pound model. Ray said his issue with it was it floated. When launching he had to push it down to get the model clear, and when retrieving he had to hold on to it or it would fall over, while trying get hold of a big model with spars sticking out everywhere. If the water was choppy or boaters were making wakes, it was that much more difficult. He also didn't like that he had to go into knee-deep water, at least. Dan, also from RCGroups, and the fellow that developed the sliding-brace-winch, has an SC&H brig he's modeled as the US brig Syren. It also came with the same hand-truck Ray's Surprise did. Dan wasn't all that enamored with it either. He pointed out how when you lean it back to move the model, it put you in among the rigging risking damage or even injury. Dan altered his hand-truck into a cart and has not looked back. In my mind, it's a boat. I have a 16 foot sailboat, and to move it, and launch it, I use a boat-trailer, so it would make sense to make a boat-trailer for the model. I scribbled an idea on paper, but then turned to some old 3D modeling software so I could see it better. My model has a 4 foot long ballast tube bolted to the keel. So I figured a U shaped channel to cradle that tube and support the model would be the basis of the cart. While Dan's cart has worked great for him, I didn't care for his 3-wheeled arrangement. Like an actual boat trailer, I opted for a single axle right under the model. I figured this would be more easily maneuvered and handle terrain a little better. I figured on making the cart from angle steel I dould bolt together. I over-designed the thing a bit, drawing a framework that would cradle the model that the more I looked at, the less I thought I needed. Going back to my real boat trailer, It just had center support and a pair of carpet cover skids (bunkers) to hold the boat up-right. Simple is always the best approach - and I had just the right material to build this cart from - a steel bed-frame. This L-angled steel had the strength to easily carry the model while using a minimum of material, and it certainly wasn't going to float! Two girders would form a U shaped channel to cradle the ballast tube. I figured a rod axle would need support or it could bend with a 100 pound model bouncing on it, a third angle would be set across for the axle. A couple of upright posts with padding would hold the model upright. Nearly all the weight of the model rests in the channel, so there's not a lot of strain on the uprights. I didn't have a cutting wheel so tried cutting the bed frame with a reciprocating saw. Bed frame steel is hard, it ate both blades, and two more I bought before finally getting the three main pieces cut, though I had no trouble drilling it. I used the u-bolt portion of a set of wire-clamps to hold the axle. A bit of flat steel to brace the axle so it wouldn't try to twist. It's all held together with nuts and bolts. I wanted short pieces of steel for and aft to hold the loose ends of the channel, but I wasn't gonna try to cut that stuff again, so I just used some scrap 2x4. To hold the handle I tried mounting a wood block with a hole forward, but then I remembered I had a flag-pole mount from when I replaced a rotten post on the porch. It took some searching, but I found it and screwed it on. The wheels are shopping cart wheels bought new from Ace Hardware online for about $5 each. I looked into inflatable wheels to give a softer ride, but they were too expensive for me. I watch the local thrift shops though, and if something shows up with nice wheels, I'll grab it. A fender washer goes on the axle first, so the wheel doesn't rub against the axle support; then the wheel, another washer, and a hitch-pin holds it all on. I can pull the hitch pins and remove the wheels making it easier to stow the cart. The uprights are simple 3/4" pine with some pipe insulation for padding (as opposed to tennis balls in the 3D model). They're bolted to the axle support, but I want to alter that a little so they can be folded in to make the cart flatter for transport. The handle is an old wood closet pole I've had for a long time. A bit too old it would turn out, but that's a later story. I painted it white for visibility as it also serves as a guard to protect the model's bowsprit from cell-phone wielding idiots that seem to be the most common form of life on this planet now. I painted the cart blue, because it wasn't black, white, or red; the other colors I had. Unfortunately, I wasn't ready in time to the museum event, and didn't go, but I wanted to sail the model before it got cold, and see if this thing worked.

Triton by Krampus Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
With my boats getting routinely stranded in the middle of nowhere, I felt compelled to commission a rescue vessel and "Triton" was born. "Triton" is a Springer-type tug push boat. With a hull and superstructure consisting of an “Indiana” style command cabin, it was built using a pretty basic birch plywood American kit designed for swimming pool water polo. Kit altered to resemble a fictitious Salvamento Marítimo (Spanish Coast Guard) unit following Salvamento Marítimo’s actual boat markings. Equipment and deck layout inspired on actual Springer tug push boats supporting larger vessels and barges found in US and European ports and rivers. Model built during September – October 2015. Approx. 1/18 scale. Real life boat could be a 30-footer (9.14m) vessel. Equipped with 9v LED navigation lights and sound system. Powered by an HPI Racing 1145 Gt 550 Motor, NiMH 7.4v battery, a 3-bladed 44mm propeller, and a 6-12V 320A RC Ship & Boat R/C Hobby Brushed Motor Speed Controller.

Masts, mast steps, inside the hull, the rudder by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
The model's lower masts are made of white cedar. These were cut square, a taper hand-planed in, made 8-sided, then round. The bands are the same brown paper tape the hull was covered in. A visit to the real ship in Baltimore to get measurements, and look at some artifacts netted me some bits of live oak original to the ship. The Navy began stockpiling live oak for ship-building in 1816 with the Gradual Increase Act. It was from these stockpiles that Constellation was built. These trees were as much as 200 years old when cut, so this wood I have could be as much as 400 years old. I wasn't sure how to incorporate this bit of the ship into the model, and opted to make the mast steps from it. One piece is the size of a business card and stamped USS Constellation 1854. I'll stamp the year she's finally finished and my name into that and install it as her builder's plate. The masts step on what I call her mechanical decks. These are simple 3/8" plywood panels where her mechanics and controls will be mounted. Beams were epoxied into the hull for them, and they are held in place with brass wood screws. The aft deck is where the mizzen steps and the rudder servo is mounted. The battery lies on it's own deck just abaft the main mast as low as it can possibly be inside the hull. The cross-section drawing shows deck beams, decks, ballast rods, the external ballast, etc etc etc. The rudder is made from Plexiglas as shown in it's drawing. A brass tube passes through the stern that the rudder's head just fits into. There's no room behind the rudder head for a bell-crank setup to work, so I again went with real boat tech and installed a tiller, made of copper plate soldiered to a set-collar. There's a couple of pictures of the aluminum tubes for the ballast rods in there. You may want to right-click on an image, like the drawings, and "View Image" then click on it to see it full size and legible. Use the browser's "back" button to get out of that.

PT Boat 673 by AllenA Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Magnificent beast wcolombo. Any chance of a video?👍

PT Boat 673 by wcolombo Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
PT Boat scale 1/20 length 1.22 m, Motorization one brushless motor and two 550 14 v motors , fiberglass hull, superstructure in acrylic laser cut, details in resin and 3D print.