Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
October 2018: 5 people
September 2018: 13 people
August 2018: 5 people
July 2018: 8 people
June 2018: 8 people
May 2018: 7 people
April 2018: 24 people
March 2018: 13 people
February 2018: 8 people
January 2018: 9 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (19)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > raf rescue

raf rescue
raf rescue
raf rescue
46Firefloat Mk2 paint by astromorg Seaman   Posted: 2 months ago
Knowing v little about radio waves and antenna construction, I'm happy to accept your line. My assessment was purely on trying to identify the teardrop's purpose and matching its shape to similar units in RAF use. It was usual for ships then - merchant and military - to have a DF system and it just seems logical for a vessel with search and rescue responsibilities to have one! Positioning of nav lights was subject to complex rules in the 1950s and still is! One thing, that I don't think has changed, is that the for'd steaming light must be mounted a significant height above the red/greenside lights. The cabin roof would not be enough! Interesting that we both have similar lengths of experience associated with similar naval vessels. Maybe we crossed paths sometime gone!!

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by pittsfieldpete Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
Hello, Figtree7nts: What about “happy”? You wrote “we're all one big family”. Over here we’d usually say “we're all one big, happy family”. Are we not happy? Would anyone not grin from ear to ear when they see their boat on the water for the first time? Wouldn’t any of us be over the moon when our new boat kit arrives? If this or any other hobby doesn’t make us happy then why do it at all? The above is all in good fun but far off topic. Over to you, Doug: For my project can I use the spreadsheets & drawing you’ve already sent or do you plan on posting revised versions based on your operating observations & adjustments? I’m going make a PDF of this entire post eventually so I’ll have a good reference to use as my project progresses. There a many very useful tips & parts sources throughout as well. BTW have seen the scale boats made by Aquacraft? They’ve got four very nice boats (actually three boats & one ship) that are large, very well detailed & realistic. There’s a tug, a fire/rescue boat, a trawler & a fantastic 1/72 scale US Navy Fletcher-class destroyer that could easily be used as a movie prop. It’s over 5 feet long & priced at about $700 US. My wife said if I spend that much on a boat she’d better be able to ride in it or she’ll leave. I’ll really miss the old girl.🤪Here’s a link to Aquacraft’s page for the model. There’s a nice photo gallery as well as a video: https://www.aquacraftmodels.com/boats/aqub5705-fletcher-clas... I have my eye on the Bristol Trawler. I’ve always like trawlers & the Bristol is a beauty. It comes with a full range of LED navigation lights (including mast lights). There’s no working horn but that’s about the only thing lacking. This reminds of a joke: Why do cows have bells?🐮Because their horns don’t work! Thanks, Pete.

What do you do when... by boaty Admiral   Posted: 3 months ago
I have had this problem several times myself especially with fast electrics when they "flip" over. At present I take my old Aerokits Sea Commander with me to use as a rescue boat but there is always some element of difficulty when trying to line it up with the upturned craft. How you deal with it depends on the size of your boating lake. On small ones it is possible to have a vertical pole mounted on the bank with a long length of string attached to it. You then roll out the string and walk round until the string makes contact with your boat then slowly walk back bringing the boat to the side. Building a rescue craft like you describe is perfectly normal as I have seen them from time to time and also you see them on You Tube when retrieving usually (you guess it), a fast electric in distress. Good luck with your project and you can also disguise your "rescue boat" to look like a pusher tug etc.😁

RE ads90's Vosper Firefloat by nasraf Commander   Posted: 4 months ago
It is a little while ago since this subject was raised but I came across it to day whilst passing my time looking through this continuingly interesting web site, but for what it is worth I will outline a bit I know about the RAF marine branch. I was one of the last National Service RAF enlisted men and started my service 5 th April 1960. I was then trained as an Air Wireless Fitter at Yatesbury and on passing the reqired tests was posted to RAF Mountbatten in May 1961, this was sited on the coastline of Plymouth Sound and the marine craft were moored on the Cattewater. Not long before I got there, the main base for the RAF Marine activities was on the I. of W. at Calshot but the decision had been made, due to the great contraction of the marine arm, as helicopters had taken over the rescue task and the loss in interest in aircraft operating from water, the MU ( Maintenance Unit ) was moved to the operational station at Plymouth. Mountbatten was quite busy with various activities and it was the H.Q. of Coastal Command the other activities was in providing targets for Shackelton training, dingy drill for aircrew and survival training for aircrew on Dartmoor. All the useful marine craft were moved to Plymouth and I would imagine things like Fire Floats would have been disposed of prior to the move. All that was at Mountbatten were RTTL's of various standards, RSL's and Pinnance's. The only strange item was an old Rescue Launch which was powered by 3 Napier Lion engines, all the later RTTLs had Rolls Royce Merlin derivatives. This was the only large boat that I ever had a fast ride on, but unfortunately we were only a few miles out of the Sound when one of the engines failed and we had to limp home. I never had a fast trip on a RTTL. I used to have lots of trips outside the breakwater on RSL's on RAF crew dingy drill, when the pilot under training had to jump off the boat with his uninflated dingy and when the RSL made as many waves as possible he had to inflate it and climb in whilst the launch continued to rough the sea up as much as possible. He then stayed in his dingy for about 45 minutes which was not very pleasant in winter. It was for us lesser mortals an enjoyable spectator sport to see commissioned officers undergoing sme discomfort. I think that all the odd marine equipment was lost when Calshot closed.

RAF Air Sea Rescue Launch by ronrees Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 6 months ago
[Score: 10/10] 16"/500g RAF Air Sea Rescue Launch Capable of 15mph and a runtime of 90mins Single Propellor (2 Blade X Type 25mm) Direct Drive to a Turnigy 2211 x 1400kv (2 Blade X Type) Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) 2Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through HK 10 Car For/Rev. (5Amps) ESC - Comments: This is another article for MB magazine. The model plan had to fit across 2 pages (A3) Hence its length. This one is built using the old Keil Kraft Eezibilt methods of the late 1950's. Made using mainly Balsa wood and covered in nylon tights and dope. It is fully detailed mainly using odds and ends . The plexiglass gun turrets are made using 21mm Carp fishing 'Ball' floats. Masters in plastic were fitted to the model after mouldings were made for the Oerlikon 20mm and all the Lewis guns as well as shrapnel padding and most fittings. 2 sheets of highly detailed plans will be free in the Winter Special hopefully with a full photo and build write up. It goes like a rocket. Great little model and all for under £25.00!. (Inc ESC, Motor and battery!)

Background Information by CB90 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
HSL100 Type 2 High Speed Launch 63 feet 21.5 tons 39 Knots 1941 built by The British Power Boat Company and popularly known as the 'Whaleback' (as the cabin looks like a whale diving). The craft operating in the North Sea / English Channel. Their armament consisted of any weapon which the crew could find, they started of with a single 303 in each ball turret and progressed to twin 303's, also some had two paired 303's on twin mounting posts and a 20mm on the rear deck where the life raft was originally. Between the 15th July 1940 and October Britain lost 215, hard to replace, pilots and aircrew to the seas. Thus in February 1941, with the motto "The sea shall not have them".The Air Sea Rescue Services (ASRS) were created, which later became the RAF Search and Rescue Force. :- 122 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 123 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 124 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 125 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 126 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 127 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 128 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 129 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 130 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 131 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 132 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 133 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 134 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 135 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 136 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 137 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 138 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 139 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 140 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 141 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 142 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 143 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 144 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 145 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 146 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 147 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 148 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 149 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK - 156 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 157 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 158 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 159 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 161 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 162 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 163 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 164 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 165 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 166 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 168 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 169 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 171 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 172 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 173 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 174 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 175 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 176 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 177 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 178 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 179 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 180 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 181 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 182 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 183 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 185 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 186 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 187 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 188 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 189 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 190 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK - 2250 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK - 2546 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 2547 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 2548 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 2549 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 2550 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 2551 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK By the end of WWII more than 8,000 aircrew and 5,000 civilians had been rescued by the service. The role of aircraft in the ASRS was to locate downed airmen and help them, by dropping them survival equipment and stores, while they waited for an ASRS launch to pick them up.

Grimmershorn II by CB90 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
[Score: 5/10] 40"/5000g Grimmershorn II Capable of 7mph and a runtime of 60mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 70mm) Direct Drive to a 950 (3 Blade) Powered by Lead Acid (12v) 12Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through 15A 24v (5Amps) ESC - Comments: The Motor vessel 'Grimmershorn' was built in 1956/57 by Hansa Stahlund Schiffbau GmbH at Koln-Deutz for the Waterways and Shipping Administration at Cuxhaven.Her Daimler-Benz four stroke diesel engine had an output of 500hp. permitting a speed of 11.5 knots. The model hull and deck are vacuum formed ABS, timber work of precision cut ply, 2 full size plan sheets and a construction manual along with a fittings pack complete this kit. Technical Data Scale: 1:20 Length: 1038mm Beam 305mm The Grimmershorn was the second major kit I purchased from a model shop on the outskirts of Harlow in Essex back in the 1980s. The Krik kit is still produced and sold today. My build was a slow and lost enthusiasm so after completing the hull, deck, motor and bow thruster installation I gave the boat to my father in-law who completed the superstructure and sailed the boat for a while, eventually the boat was given back to me when the father in-law moved house. I then repaired the rudder, added a moving radar, a adjustable water cannon and pump also various extra fittings such as a detailed life raft and crane, buoys and captain figure. thus renamed the boat as Grimmershorn II a Search and rescue fire boat.

RE ads90's Vosper Firefloat by boaty Admiral   Posted: 9 months ago
Thanks for your reply and its very interesting. Was your model based on an advanced Fire Float that little was known about outside of military circles? Bridlington is only a short distance from RAF Elvington which was a bomber base in WW2. In the 1950s it became a V Bomber base and logically it would need to have improved marine rescue facilities to deal with aircraft that had ditched in the North Sea. It could be that your boat was built to fulfil this role and there may be a possibility that other Fire Floats may have been constructed for similar uses but not disclosed. 😁😁😁. Boaty

"Westbourne" by ads90 Commander   Posted: 9 months ago
Westbourne is a Port of London Authority steam Tug from the Caldercraft Mini-Fleet Range - it is 1:48 scale. This model was discontinued a few years ago but I did manage to purchase a brand new boxed one via ebay a couple of years ago. During her time Westbourne was hired by the Royal Navy as a rescue tug. She saw service with them between October 1916 and July 1919 in the HM Dockyard. Prior to that she was on general towing service duties on the Thames. She can be found mentioned in “SHIPS OF THE ROYAL NAVY, 1914-1919 - by TYPE & CLASS Section 3. SUPPORT and HARBOUR VESSELS” Following the first world war ‘Westbourne’ was one of three tugs attached to the Port of London Authority (PLA) Dredging Service, they were the "Westbourne", "Thorney" and "Brent", they were all fitted with a drag and under running gear.In 1940 during the Battle of Britain. ‘Westbourne’ and many other tugs were used in assisting the berthing of these large ships that entered the Thames. The photos show from box to construction plus her on the water.

TRIUMPH (CG-52301) by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 52"/5700g TRIUMPH (CG-52301) Capable of 12mph and a runtime of 60mins Direct Drive to a 775 JOHNSON-TYPE FAN-COOLED 6-12V (5 Blade) Powered by NiMH (8.4v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through DIMART 320A FAN-COOLED ESC - Comments: ON THE WAYS: BARRACUDA RC BOATS 1:12 USCG 52' TYPE F WOODEN MOTOR LIFEBOAT; NAMED "TRIUMPH" (CG-52301), IN HONOR OF THE RESCUE CRAFT LOST IN JAN 1961 DURING RESCUE ATTEMPT WITH LOSS OF ALL HANDS. THIS KIT IS ONE OF THREE IN EXISTENCE, THE OTHER TWO BEING BUILT BY A GENTLEMAN IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST (ONE FOR PERSONAL, THE OTHER FOR A MUSEUM. SHE IS MAINLY LASER CUT BALTIC BIRCH PLYWOOD; THE FALSE KEEL 19MM THICK, RIBS 5.5MM, DECK AND HULL & CABINS 3MM. THE HULL WILL BE COVERED AND REINFORCED WITH POLYESTER FABRIC AND MINWAX POLYURETHANE. THE DECK WILL BE COVERED BY 1/8" BASSWOOD SCRIBED SHEATHING AND THE FANTAIL SEMICIRCLE ABOVE THE STERN POST WILL BE 1/16". FINISH WITH A LIGHT MAHOGANY DECK COAMING. HANDMADE WOODEN RUDDER ON A 3/8" POST STEERED BY A SAIL WINCH SERVO & CABLE SYSTEM, RABOESCH 75MM 5-BLADE BRASS WHEEL TURNED BY A 4MM S/S SHAFT. MOST DECK FITTINGS AND HOUSINGS ARE HANDMADE WHENEVER POSSIBLE AND WOOD REMAINS NATURAL WHEN DETAIL ALLOWS IT, AS I DON'T ENJOY PAINTING OVER NATURAL GRAIN. I LOVE TO REPURPOSE THE LEFTOVER LUMBER FROM KIT TEMPLATES, LORD KNOWS I HAVE PLENTY OF IT. OH WELL, THE TEMP OUTSIDE IS GONNA DELAY ANY PAINTING, ANYWAY.THIS ONE'S TOO BIG FOR THE TUB, SO COME NEXT NAVIGATION SEASON, I'LL BE INVESTING IN A 12X4 FT. INFLATABLE POOL. LET'S GO RC BOATING! YES, MR. ARNOLD PALMER WAS A US COAST GUARDSMAN (YM3) 1950-53

RAF rescue launch shape by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
Hi Selwyn, apropos Curtis Tomahawk - check this out new from Airfix 😉 https://www.airfix.com/uk-en/curtis-tomahawk-mk-iib-1-72.htm... Cheers Doug 😎

RAF rescue launch shape by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
Going back to the original question!! Basic formula for scaling, up or down, to make it easier for awkward numbers (i.e. not simple fractions) is- Given S1 is original scale, F is scaling factor, S2 is new scale, Then S2=S1x1/F From example above; S1=37, F=1.5. Gives S2=37/1.5 =24.66r. QED. Cheers Doug 😎

RAF rescue launch shape by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
Re other RAF boats - for info and lots of pics on all classes of boats used by the RAF click here- http://www.rafboats.co.uk/ Guess the 'old sea dogs' already know this but many newbies perhaps not 😉 Cheers Doug 😎

RAF rescue launch shape by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
Hi Selwyn, Brilliant, link is good. 👍 What a gorgeous sound 😉 Nice landing, that guy can fly!

RAF rescue launch shape by SelwynWilliams Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
Hi Doug, thanks for that. That photo of ST 480 shows her off Lyme Regis which is where she was stationed in 1941 and was being used as the Range Safety boat for the ranges off Chesil Beach that day when the P40 crashed and they picked up the pilot.