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>> Home > Tags > rc craft

rc craft
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aquacraft atlantic
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chris craft
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rc craft
Mahogany in Scale by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 hours ago
Doug, I don't generally "do" foreign and Pete certainly wouldn't. As you say, most are model railway or strictly stick and string model ships. What we wanted to do was a general model hobby museum with a bias toward the RC hobbies. Ain't none of them. History of RC, RC cars, boats and aircraft. Materials, tools, etc. Mags and books, that kind of thing. Martin

Old Futaba servo wiring... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
Mornin John Re detector circuit: It's not very complicated, only 3 or 4 actual components. The clues are good RF diode and a very sensitive meter! I just bought a couple of 300microamp full scale meters. Will do a little blog when I've tidied it up and boxed it. Re Heli: can you post or mail me pics of the TX, RX and ESC please. Brushed or Brushless motors? Given manufacturer / model numbers I might be able to figure out what the pissibolities are. No promises though 😉 Sounds to me like the TX stick is set up for forwards / backwards like a normal car or boat set up. I.e. for 0 to full speed in either direction is only half the stick travel. For aircraft 0 is full down, giving you the full stick travel for the speed range. The ESC probably needs to be 're-educated' and the TX throttle stick re-programmed, IF at all possible with the TX you got with the Heli. Re " P.S. Signals come from where Doug?" - Don't understand the question John ?? Cheers, Doug 😎

SA Valour Class Frigate by Joburg-sailor Petty Officer   Posted: 7 days ago
Wish I had caught up with you earlier Doug as your input re the MEKO 200 SAN would have been of great help. Fortunately (also late in the build) I found a long lost 2nd cousin (twice removed!) who served onboard the Spioenkop on her delivery voyage in 2005 and got some good stuff from him. Also found a clip on Facebook that provided detail that I had missed. Watch the interest of the bridge officers as they notice the drone filming them! https://www.facebook.com/andre.oosthuizen.9615/videos/vb.100... Currently the hangar door and chopper movement is not connected to anything...just demonstrated by putting then in contact with a battery individually. I have a spare channel on the stick and also the on/off switch used for model aircraft engine/power cut that I use on my Corvette model for the smoke generator. The sequence I would like to achieve is 1. Activate (power on) door opens. 2. Door reaches stop ...microswitch/ (stays fully open) 3. Chopper movement switch on 4. Chopper clears hangar and reaches stop on helipad. 5. If pos, close sequence in reverse of above. Reilly4 I can let you have a short video but I need some help as to how I place a video on the website. Some more pics taken during the build process attached just FYI.

Model hovercraft plans by Mzee Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 8 days ago
Is it a boat; is it a 'plane? Having made a very simple hovercraft back in 1954 (I think!!), I am now thinking of making another but need some assistance from anyone who has gone into this fascinating aspect, in the form of drawings and whether or not a skirt is necessary. My first model was Baby Bee powered and free running - R/C wasn't as miniature then as it is now!! Pic shows the models I left with friends when we left Kenya in 1963 - the hovercraft is on the left next to the c/l flying saucer!

Air screw driven hydro by boaty Captain   Posted: 15 days ago
I recently acquired an air screw driven hydroplane fitted with an A.M 15 diesel engine. The boat appeared to have either been from the Mercury Kit which was produced from the early 1960s till late 1970s or may have been built from the plans. What was unusual is that it had been fitted with R.C for rudder only operation and when I put a receiver in to try it, the system worked well. I also ran the engine and it appears to have been as new and after examination of the boat this appeared to have not been used either. In the 1960s I had built a couple of airscrew boats and they were free running powered by engines taken from my control line model aircraft after they had been pranged. Intentions are to eventually get the hydroplane on the water with brushless electric power due to the "No I.C" rules on my local boating lakes, something I never had to worry about as a 15 year old . Boaty😎

Spektrum, new, useless... by stormin Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 29 days ago
Hi Martin, glad Doug sorted your spektrum, the problem is we do live in a different world now, back in the 70s 80s and 90s a model rc aircraft was something small boys and even big boys would be in wonder of because you had to spend a lot of time effort,money,and patience to have one. However that is not the case now, I can go to Tesco just now and for very little money (£35ish) walk out of the door with a small 4 channel 2.4GHz rc plane and go attempt to fly it in my local park. Now there lies the problem model rc aircraft are no longer things old men like us would spend months making then going to our club fields to fly. Let's go one step further, let's go to any good model shop and buy, ready to fly, what is described on the box as a "Park flyer" now this Park flyer is capable of over 100mph coming out of a reversal manoeuvre in straight and level flight. Now we on here would never fly this model in a public place, but a lot of people will and do. I used to be an active member of SMAE way back but am no longer because I'm lucky enough to have access to a totally private field. Norman.

Norfolk Wherry Fans by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Still a bit on the heavy side. Fine silk "might" do but I might end up making loads of suits with Esaki tissue. There used to be a type of processed tissue with a slight gloss on it and a clothlike feel to it.Anyone know what it's called or where I can get it.The Barge is ten and a half inches long, not 8,with an open well deck. I could fit mini RC and a motor etc but it would be exposed. I could I expect cover it with a tarp as though it was carrying cargo. Some of you might suggest it's too small to bother with but it's like the peanut scale in the aircraft world. OR👍👍 A novelty TOY. Cheers all.

RE ads90's Vosper Firefloat by nasraf Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
It is a little while ago since this subject was raised but I came across it to day whilst passing my time looking through this continuingly interesting web site, but for what it is worth I will outline a bit I know about the RAF marine branch. I was one of the last National Service RAF enlisted men and started my service 5 th April 1960. I was then trained as an Air Wireless Fitter at Yatesbury and on passing the reqired tests was posted to RAF Mountbatten in May 1961, this was sited on the coastline of Plymouth Sound and the marine craft were moored on the Cattewater. Not long before I got there, the main base for the RAF Marine activities was on the I. of W. at Calshot but the decision had been made, due to the great contraction of the marine arm, as helicopters had taken over the rescue task and the loss in interest in aircraft operating from water, the MU ( Maintenance Unit ) was moved to the operational station at Plymouth. Mountbatten was quite busy with various activities and it was the H.Q. of Coastal Command the other activities was in providing targets for Shackelton training, dingy drill for aircrew and survival training for aircrew on Dartmoor. All the useful marine craft were moved to Plymouth and I would imagine things like Fire Floats would have been disposed of prior to the move. All that was at Mountbatten were RTTL's of various standards, RSL's and Pinnance's. The only strange item was an old Rescue Launch which was powered by 3 Napier Lion engines, all the later RTTLs had Rolls Royce Merlin derivatives. This was the only large boat that I ever had a fast ride on, but unfortunately we were only a few miles out of the Sound when one of the engines failed and we had to limp home. I never had a fast trip on a RTTL. I used to have lots of trips outside the breakwater on RSL's on RAF crew dingy drill, when the pilot under training had to jump off the boat with his uninflated dingy and when the RSL made as many waves as possible he had to inflate it and climb in whilst the launch continued to rough the sea up as much as possible. He then stayed in his dingy for about 45 minutes which was not very pleasant in winter. It was for us lesser mortals an enjoyable spectator sport to see commissioned officers undergoing sme discomfort. I think that all the odd marine equipment was lost when Calshot closed.

Crash Tender davit info... by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I have done some more digging and I hope this confirms the colour scheme for the boat. please see the reply I received from:- Donald Smith RAF MARINE CRAFT HISTORIAN Hello, Colour scheme for the above boat is as follows. Black topsides, red oxide anti-fouled bottom separated by a 2in white waterline. All decks dark grey anti-slip deck paint, cabin sides light grey, cabin roofs white anti-slip deck paint. Mast-white, monitors red, crash ladder and davit silver/aluminium. An RAF roundel is centred 5ft 4in back from stem and 2ft 1.5in above mean waterline. The centre red disc 4in Dia., middle white circle 8in Dia., and the outer blue circle 12in Dia. The bottom of the white bow numbers should be 2ft 7in above mean waterline. They are 9in high by 6in wide with a 1.5in stroke width and a 2in separation between each number. The forward end of numbers 3 or 4 on the starboard side is 12in back from the outside of the roundel (Port side similar). The main FIRE letters are 2ft 6in high by 2ft wide with a stroke width of 6in and a separation of 6in between letters. The base of the letters is 7.5in above mean waterline. Transom numbers are 10in high by 8in wide and a stroke width of 1.5in and a separation on 2in. Base of numbers to be 1ft 5in above mean waterline. Draft marks are 3in high with a 0.5in stroke. I hope this meets with your requirements. Yours faithfully Donald Smith RAF MARINE CRAFT HISTORIAN.

Charging NiMhs, one for Doug?... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Right, gentlemen who know fings, here are shots of the wires I have. OK, I must have put the banana plugged wires in a box marked R/C Gear, I'm assuming, but the charger's wires mainly have brick red flat contact -containing plugs. However, none of my battery packs have those, they have the white things with two small round pins in 'em, one socket square, one round. The newest pack for binding duties has a little black jobby that fits the Rxs. Pictures included of all relevance. I tried to charge an old(ish) lead acid after making up a lead, but the charger put up a "Connection Break" legend on its screen. I assume that means, That one's f****d, mate. Fair enough, I thought it might be. But i still haven't worked out a lead to charge those green wrapped old NiMhs. I HAVE charged them before, because I have had two attempts at flying the aircraft. It went round in circles and then took a slate off my daughter's roof, proving that aircraft models really DO need insurance! Anyway, enclosed are three pics. The shot of a Lipo is to show that I do have such things, but that dates way back and although not damaged or bulged hasn't been charged while I've had it. It was sent to me with 2 small outrunner brushless jobbies and a couple of brushed ESCs as a thankyou for sending plywood to a part of Britain that the PO won't go to with biggish parcels. Finally....I have today received my FlySky RC set and guess what? It all works, perfectly, out of the box. It's PRE-BOUND! Whoopee do! It musdt be an upgrade as it came with a small Li-Po battery pack for the Tx. and a charge lead from USB to Tx. body. That's all great, but how do I know how long to charge it for? It currently has what looks like a full charge on it, judging by the brightness of the LEDs. Getting used to a passable impression of my son's old Subaru front wheel and tyre (complete with vented disc and caliper behind!) will take a while. I am guessing that pushing the throttle trigger forward is like a brake on a car. I assume on a boat it would be reverse? The instructions are not in any way exhaustive! But hey...on a tatty old Futaba servo it all worked a treat. Here's the pics of wires. Cheers, Martin

Charging NiMhs, one for Doug?... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Evenin' Martin, Oh dear oh dear oh dear! 😲 There is some good advice above, but maybe not optimally expressed for use by a Luddite! Sorry guys but this might be a relatively long post to separate the wheat from the chaff, explode a few myths and resolve this little conundrum of Martin's! One thing at a time! NUMBER1. THE RADIO- Dear Martin: Whatever possessed a self confessed Luddite and Scrooge like you to spring a large chunk of your hard earned pension on one of the most expensive and complex RC sets on the market in the first place???? I bought a Spektrum DX6 on impulse a few years ago while strolling around Conrad here in Munich. I've regretted it ever since. In retrospect it was way too expensive >600€, and complex. It is intended for the Fly Boys, as unfortunately most sets are these days. I have still not successfully programmed it to do what I want to do, instead of what it is pre-programmed to do for helis and fixed wing aircraft. Not even with it's own Spektrum RX, let alone a 'foreign' RX like Orange. So I have not yet risked it in a model. Definitely NOT my Catalina. Since then I have bought a Turnigy I6. Which does the same as the Spektrum, works fine with my Orange RX with giro for the Catalina😉, cost only 69€ (is now available for around 33 quid😡) and within a few hours I had it programmed and tested to do all I want in my destroyer and Sea Scout.👍 In short: the Spektrum is way way way Overkill for your yacht or Fire Float or similar, where you will only ever want rudder and sail servo / winch or rudder and speed control. So flog the Spektrum and get a nice simple (and cheap😉) 2 or 4 channel set. I can't imagine you ever wanting to start building special effects into your models so 2 (max 4) channels is all you will probably ever need. Stick your Spektrum on eBay, maybe you'll get at least a 100 quid for it. If you still want to go 2.4Gig get yourself a Turnigy i6 set with RX, 6 ch but cheap enough and I can help you directly with binding and programming from experience - I have a good English manual with no Chenglish gobbledygook. If not and you still have a working 27 or 40MHz FM set (40 would be better) use that. Where you sail, all alone, who's going to bother you or be bothered? BTW: Yes the Spektrum TX IS DSM2 and DSX compatible BUT you have to tell it what you want to use!!! Frankly I think trying that with a non-Spektrum RX is risky - especially first time out and for a novice Luddite😉 NUMBER 2. THE NiMh BATTERY- Voltage is not a reliable indication of battery charge / remaining capacity. After use a battery will recover slightly when at rest and the open terminal (off load) voltage will rise, often to the nominal voltage or slightly above. This is NO indicator of remaining charge as when a load is applied the voltage will drop again rapidly, the higher the current drawn the faster the voltage drops. If it goes below 1.0V per cell the battery will be permanently damaged and never regain it's original capacity. Haverlock is dead right about batteries losing charge when not used or regularly recharged. An NiMh batt loses charge at the rate of about 1% per day so after 3 months or so you can send it to the great recycling depot in the sky and buy a new one. Periodic cycling, discharge / charge prevents / minimises this - see care hints I posted above. And yes, NiMh do have that irritating Memory effect🤔 albeit not so pronounced as with NiCads. Lipos apparently not, but I ain't seen any evidence yet - the jury is still out! Sooo - ignore the 6.37V and run the batt through a discharge and full charge cycle. If your new NiMh batt has not yet been cycled and charged I would bet that it's present capacity is about 45%. See example below (and in attached pic) of one of my new 4.8V (nom) NiMh RX batts. NUMBER 3. THE CAPACITY CHECKER - "Glorified voltmeter" ? Where did the 6.37V reading come from if not from your 'new toy'? If it is showing volts it should also be showing capacity in %age. If you received the wrong thing it's not the "bloody electrics" but the bloody nit who packed and sent it that's at fault. Before you send it back check the below😉 Send me a photo of the Checker you have and with your battery plugged in so I can see what's happening on the display. Otherwise we are all poking about in the dark (Are we back to Jules and his friend Sandy😉😲) The link I sent you was for a checker exactly the same as mine except for the labelling! As you can see in my photo, properly connected it shows the terminal voltage and the remaining capacity (charge level) of the battery pack. Forget the Nixx (=2 Ni possibilities) display, that just means 'It ain't a LiXX' (3 Li- pissibolities). Attached photo shows a brand new 4 cell NiMh RX pack 4.8V (Nominal) connected to one of my Checkers. As you can see the voltage shown is 5.19V, according to the popular 'folklore' that would seem to indicate FULL charge. Unfortunately not🤔 Capacity indication is 45% which is normal for brand new batteries in storage and transit. Explanation thereof - see above! RE: " If it can do LiPos, why not the relatively simpler NiMhs?" a) the LiPo pack has a different chemistry and construction which requires different input circuitry on the checker, b) LiPos need balancing and are fitted with Balancer Plugs which connect to the multipin connectors on the checker. Each pin connects to one cell of the LiPo so that they can be monitored individually. LiPo chargers use this to balance the cells to within 0.01V (100mV) or less by adjusting the charge / discharge currents to each cell. The checkers use this to show you the individual cell voltages and charge states. A big difference, i.e.lower V and capacity, indicates cells with faults, e.g. higher internal resistance, or a discharged pack which needs charging and balancing. NiMh packs don't usually have this facility to measure individual cells. They are thus connected to a separate input on the checker which can then only show total pack terminal voltage and capacity. BTW: if you can get it passed 'THE Management' store your battery packs in the fridge😲 The 'coolth' slows down the rate of self discharge, which is a function of the battery internal resistance, which reduces slightly with reduced temperature😉 Enough for now, back to stripping my PTB for it's Midlife Refit! Cheers, Doug 😎 PS Martin: Just saw your post about another RX. Why the hell not buy a Spektrum designed Rx guaranteed to work with their TX? Or better still; flog the Spektrum and get a nice simple Turnigy set as above, also recommended by Ron, albeit the 9 ch version. All this frigging about with 'claimed compatible' bits and pieces just wastes money and time, fogs the issue and don't prove nutt'n!

drum sail winch questions... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hmmm, seems whatever I do I need to tie more knots to use either a ring (as per Havelock's video) or a bowsie. The knots are tied in the string on the winch drum and that was a pain to get the tension right, so I'm thinking just a piece of slit tube to get over the string, then crimp up with electrical contact pliers for a good crimp. Still waiting for the battery pack to arrive for the RC and servos. Then I have to bind the Orange Rx. to the Spektrum Tx....ugh! I got a biddliboop from the Tx. when I put the batteries in and turned it on and a light came on in a line of lights. Fancy, this modern stuff, innit? First time the Tx. has ever been right out of the box in about 5 years since I bought it, ostensibly for a model aircraft. But aircraft are too expensive to insure, join clubs, etc., hence my switch to yachts. Just as involving as aircraft (wind strength, direction, sail trim and all that jazz), but more interesting than watching a power boat trolling round endlessly. At least, that's the plan Martin

HMS Victorious. by Scratchbuilder Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
HMS Victorious,circa 1941. Still very much in the early stages of construction. Most of the internal workings are in place ,but still a few ideas to work on. Thus far she has a working forward aircraft lift. A smoke generator (water not oil). All four rear guns rotate. A working bilge pump. Working next on how to activate the crane. All three engines are powered from a 6 volt battery. All other items mentioned above powered from another 6 volt battery,bot of which provide the main ballast. As I say still a long way to go yet as can be seen.Many of the fittings have to be more authentically painted.

Newbie radio control question by JBRCfloats Seaman   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi, Just thought I would comment regarding the difference between Mode 1 vs Mode 2. I fly aircraft, but the configuration should be the same using the radio for boats. Mode 1 - Elevator/Rudder stick on the left. Throttle/Aileron stick on the right. Mode 2 - Throttle/Rudder stick on the left. Aileron/Elevator stick on the right. I'm getting into boats now and my radio that I will using is set up in the mode 2 configuration. The choice depends on what you have used in the past or the type of radios your boating buddies use. In aircraft flying we always use the same modes just in case someone has to step in and take over the flying. In boating I don't think this a criteria due to the fact the boat would go down like aircraft do sometimes. Hope this helps.

Wherry hull in GRP by kmbcsecretary Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
I'm with you there Martin I've never been a fan of the Thames barges but I was researching something else and stumbled across the wherry and i thought that's a craft I need to build besides the beauty of it the layout of the mast being so far forward it just defines all logic of what we understand when it comes to sail powered craft , it should have it's nose permanently submerged with a tail wind. If you like I could scan and email the articles from the magazine's just send me a pm if you want them Ron