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>> Home > Tags > resin

resin
aliphatic resin glue
epoxy resin
resin
The wheelhouse navigation light. by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
This is a small item but very visible on the wheelhouse and since the standard for this item has been set I have to follow suit. So first of all get some 3mm blue LEDs ordered and then it’s on with preparing the white metal body. I used by hand as suggested a series of drills increasing in diameter until 3.1 dia was reached but only 2/3 down the length from the front the smaller hole (1.5mm) was bored right through for the wires to exit. Arrival of the LEDs, first check the LED using my power supply, just over 3 volts seems to illuminate to the correct level. Next was to remove the shoulder on its plastic casing so the whole body does not exceed 3mm over its length and lightly abrade the outside to give a diffused light. Next cut the LED legs to 2mm from the plastic casing noting which is positive, next prepare the wires. I used Futaba servo wire cable 22awg which is very flexible and with the white signal wire stripped off leaving a red and black wire. These were tinned and cropped to 2mm and then quickly soldered to the appropriate terminal. Next check the LED still works! first hurdle over, I now needed to check the that when the LED goes into the body it doesn’t short out so checking the diameter over the widest part which is over the soldered terminals this was 0.1 below 3mm. I decided that shrink sleeve was too thick so I mixed some epoxy resin and coated all around the terminals, this proved to be satisfactory in both non-conductivity and dimensionally. Now the final test, using some aliphatic wood glue I slid the LED into the body whilst it was illuminated as it was a tight push fit, bingo it’s still lit – leave to set. I used aliphatic glue, as it would be easier to remove should I ever have to change the LED. The body still needs painting white but this will be done with all the other fittings at a later stage.

Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc.... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
I did indeed use an abrasive polish on the cream paint, but as it was a very severe crack or two all along the hull, I injected resin in the crack and clamped it up as far as possible, then Milliputted in to fair it. This was between two strips of tape to prevent the spread of epoxy or Milli further than necessary. I managed to match the cream more or less and once I've put a coat of nice amber spar varnish on it'll look like the original when heeled and won't show at all when on display. Martin

Bluebird by Biscuit Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 12 days ago
[Score: 10/10] 27" Bluebird Single Propellor (2 Blade X Type) Direct Drive to a 2881kv (2 Blade X Type) Powered by LiPoly (11.1v) 4Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through ETTI (120Amps) ESC - Comments: This was a Touchwood static kit that my boy brought back from Coniston, it said it could be converted to Rc and had some sketchy drawings that were not very good. I decided to go brushless with it and lipo battery, was not an easy job as had to go it alone to find out C/G and drive set up. The kit was very poor with a twisted hull and resin parts that were far too heavy, I made some aluminium planing wedges and various other parts to save weight. This project took the best part of 5 years to complete as it would go back on the shelf as I got stumped for ideas then back off again as I found a bit more inspiration, overal it came out well and runs on rails with. Good turn of speed as you can see in the vid I posted.

samson by keithtindley Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 22 days ago
artesania kit of the tug samson .I always fit extra bits and pieces as i like to have individual non scale additions made from kit scraps attached or small resin items.They class this model as suitable for the inexperienced,i believe there should always be an adult to assist. The steel propshaft thread was damaged and i found the prop coupling is a bit cheap.The end result was excellent and the tug performs well

Electrical by Ianh Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi All Refer to attached for motor comparison. I don't like using Cyano so the hull be built using ZAP 30minute epoxy and a weather proof Alphylitic from Sika. I will more than likely use a polyurethane based glue for the skinning. The hole boat will be epoxy coated inside and out to add strength. By the way the epoxy resin will increase the strength by about 2.5😁😁

Crash Tender crew by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
The crew are currently bathed in silicon rubber, awaiting casting in resin. Here's the boat needing windows and fittings and a little tiddivating on the paint front. And the carry case, awaiting the slide-in front and a handle. Martin

Rudders and Propellers by teejay Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi all for the second blog report on the schnellboot I am going to go over the rudder a propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat, these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts. which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel) and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum powder mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The fourth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I must ask for some help could anyone advise me on the length of propeller shafts, I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft, but port and starboard will have to be longer. and I also need advice on selecting the motors, I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.

HMS Campbeltown 1941, 1/96 scale by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Steve, On my Manxman, a fast cruiser / minelayer, it was used to protect the deck where mines were dragged from the stores to the laying rails in the stern. Otherwise I've never seen extensive use of it on open decks. Mostly just in enclosed areas where there would be a lot of 'foot traffic'. In recent years (decades!?) I've seen blue, yellow and green versions inside the vessel, especially in the so called 'Citadel', a protected area which can be hermetically sealed against chemical or biological attack! 😲 The 'non slip' variants on the weather decks all seem to be paint / resin mixtures containing some sort of abrasive material. I don't think it is worth the effort you describe to depict corticene!! Cheers, Doug

Styrene Allergy? by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
An old friend of mine in Santa Monica who'd made models for years suddenly found he had a sensitivity to styrene and resins and had to pack it up. He bravely decided to go over to all metal work, but something about that disagreed with him too and he packed up all modelmaking as it was starting to affect his wife too. Heaven knows what it could have been with the metal as it was all brass, so none of that nasty storage oil they put on steels. I think I'd just put up with it as I couldn't stop modelmaking even if I wanted to. I did painting when we lived afloat for lack of space, but I didn't find it satisfying enough. Martin

Hull internal finish by Colin H. Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi there, I seal hulls inside with Eze-Kote resin, clear long lasting and quick drying, ready to paint within an hour at normal room temperature. Hope this helps you. Cheers Colin.

W1 by jbkiwi Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Thanks for the kind comments. Planking did take a couple of days but was not done all that neatly (just clamp and cyno) as I was glassing it later - it was all thin resin coated inside to seal it). Planking was just a hint at the original so you could just make out the planks through the glass. Have included a few more pics of the motors and interior which is not that flash but is unseen, (more for the fact that I had seen the original and was sort of putting down what I remembered from when I was 15) There is a small picture at the top left of the stairs which on the original, was a Photo from an HSL looking off the Stbd rear 1/4, to 2 64ft HSLs side by side climbing over its wake at speed The stair set is the original from the wheelhouse to wardroom, which has been kept and used again by the present owner (down to utility room in front of engine room) and still has the original 'POWER BOAT' rubber treads (not bad nick for 79yrs old!)

Barnett Class Lifeboat Plans by nhp651 Apprentice   Posted: 2 months ago
is this the boat you wish to build...…..I have this partly finished model that I doubt I will ever get done....grp hull and cabin with some resin fittings, also have a set of plans for ut, and plenty of photos of the Ramsey Dyce, Aberdeens boat taken recently £400.00p ono if you'd like a head start,

MAGGA DAN by chrys Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Built plank on frame and then glassed on outside and resin on inside. it is based on the time it was charted to Australia to take supplys to Antarctic stations. it is electric drive on 2/5 to 1 reduction . it is built on 1/48 scale

Sadolin by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Gardener, Don't know the Sadolin stuff, I use Billing Boats stains meself, BUT whatever you use, esp on balsa, apply a coupla coats of sealer first. Then at least one or two coats of clear satin varnish; e.g. from Lord Nelson range from Holland. THEN AND ONLY then, apply your stain til you get the depth of colour you want. After that seal with matt, satin or gloss varnish / lacquer according to taste😉 That's the way I did my Sea Scout 'Jessica' renovation, see blog on this site for results!!! Coupla sample pics attached. The whole process is described in the Blog. Otherwise the balsa will soak up all your stain and still not look right 🤔 A 'preserver' as such is not normally necessary if the wood is properly treated inside and out; sealer, stain, varnish etc! Or just EzeKote resin inside. Stain no needed inside of course. Good luck and above all have fun with your endeavours. 👍 Keep us 'up to date' ('on the running' as my German friends would say; 'auf den Laufenden'!) 😁 Cheers, Doug 😎 PS I like Danish Blue meself 😁😁 On the other hand; I wouldn't have used balsa for speedboat deck in the first place. I use a close grained marine ply 0,8 or 1.0mm. Takes the stain better and looks more realistic. Balsa is too coarse grained for stain and varnish on scale speedboats. Thick coat of paint ... OK. On the cabin roof and after deck (which I had to renew) I used 1.5mm mahogany veneer. If I had to do it again I would use a close grained 0.8mm marine ply (birch or pear) and cherry stain (also Billing) as I used on 'Jessica's deck.

1/16th scale Fire Boat decals by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
That's done. My chum is casting resin crew members as we speak and I have some binoculars in white metal. Cheers, Martin