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>> Home > Tags > resin

resin
aliphatic resin glue
epoxy resin
resin
Navigation and Deck Lighting by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 17 days ago
Hi Wayne Just seen your post. The clear resin is casting resin and it is used for encapsulating ornamental and wildlife specimens. The model train boys use it for making rivers/lakes etc. Problem is its usually sold in 1 litre tins with about a 6 month shelf life so not that cheap for our purposes. If you have a railway socy or scale model society near you could try asking if they have any? My local supplier is http://www.resin-supplie s.co.uk/ and look for GLASS CLEAR CASTING RESIN. Its about £11 per kilo. I do agree with Mark's solution but you may need to use UV safe cyano or it will yellow as does the varnish. The LED lens doesn't need to be covered so if you keep the cyano off the face it will be fine. Dave

stripping hull for repair and repaint by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
If it's old chances are it has oil based paints and will need lots of elbow grease, paint strippers and if it's anything like my Sea Queen some careful use of a hot air stripper to get the final residue out of the wood. I did start with Flash oven cleaner but changed to Nitromors and a scraper. It will be a ply hull and if it had an ic engine fitted you will need to strip out much of the inside to get rid of any diesel impregnated wood. I would also consider replacing the prop shaft and re-positioning to a less acute angle as you will not need the height in the boat that an ic required. IC used prop shafts often have little or no bearing left and can also be badly bent or twisted. Eze-Kote was very popular to protect the engine bay in a model plane and I still have a bottle bought some 20 years ago. It will protect the wood but I suspect you will need some form of tissue or cloth to make the hull waterproof. Others seem to prefer this to lay-up resin but I have not seen any pictures posted to prove its suitability. Good luck and perhaps you will consider a build blog so others can see how you progress? Dave

Fiberglassing by Delboy Apprentice   Posted: 23 days ago
I find Eze-Kote from Deluxe materials a much better material to work with than epoxy or polyester. It's a water-based resin which provides a waterproof and fuel-proof finish. you may need three or four coats but that's not a chore as it's easy to apply, there's no wastage as the pot never 'goes-off' and it's dry to a paint-able surface in half an hour. You clean up with water as well.

Fiberglassing by Trillium Commander   Posted: 24 days ago
I should clarify my comment about 'no sanding' since it's not all 'plain sailing'. The first coat goes on easily and did not, and should not, require any sanding. For the second and subsequent coats, the fibreglass is essentially smooth and does not hold the resin in place so well. So these coats will be fine on a horizontal surface, but on a slope the resin will tend to run, and overlap on a hard edge. If you can ensure that you don't apply too much resin it's fine, but if you get runs, you'll have to sand.

Fiberglassing by Trillium Commander   Posted: 25 days ago
Having now completed fibreglassing a hull using the method shown in the video mentioned earlier, I can say that this has been, by far, the most satisfactory fibreglassing I have attempted. A smooth hard finish with no bubbles, no ripples, and no sanding. So for anyone who has been struggling using the technique of undiluted resin and credit card spreaders, I can thoroughly recommend the video'd method. Roy

Ketch Irene by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
I have used balsa for the planks, covered with resin inside. Last plank going in, as shown I start with the garboard strake and the top plank & work towards the bilge. To decide the width of the planks, I rap a paper over each frame & mark the length & number. On an A4 paper mark 1/2" spaces across the top staring at the middle. Mark the same number on the bottom at 1/4", join top to bottom. Place the frame length paper across until the length touches the out side lines, draw a line across at this point. After each frame has been done cut out a strip 1/8 each side of the lines. This needs to be replicated one each side of the hull & pasted on each frame. As I fit a plank first remove the paper up to the next mark, fit the plank to this. One red arrow shows the only stealer in the original ship, which I replicated. Other shows the zinc protection against the anchor.

Fiberglassing by sonar Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Resin alone gelcoat alone and tissue alone or a mixture of any of the above has no strength. However resin used with a matting or woven roven give the strength

Fiberglassing by Trillium Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
I have read on this forum and others that fibreglass has no strength and am puzzled by these comments. Fibreglass is commonly used for building the hulls of full-size boats, including lifeboats, which implies that it has considerable strength. Admittedly, their hull walls are much thicker than on a model boat, but the strength is there. I have seen a fellow model boater take a hull made of balsa, which had been coated with fibreglass and bang it on the edge of a table, with no damage. As we all know, you can poke a finger through untreated balsa. Finally, some data is provided on wikipedia that fibreglass impregnated with polyester resin has a tensile strength of 8000 pounds per square inch. So some clarification of the 'no strength' comments would be appreciated. Roy

Fiberglassing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi chugalone 100 Welcome to the site. You can fibreglass with different types of resin and cloth. If you are making and casting a fibreglass hull use fibreglass matting but to cover a hull lightweight fibreglass cloth is best. This is the type shown in the suggested video. Resin can be epoxy or polyester based but the latter is generally cheaper and in my opinion is easier to use and doesn't require thinning with alcohol. It is sold as layup resin and is supplied with hardener. Do follow the instructions re quantity of each part and mix thoroughly. If you are using epoxy Iso Propyl Alcohol is the type to use and is clear. The video shows using a brush to apply the resin and whilst this is OK it will give a very thick and heavy coating. I use the brush to apply and then a credit card sized piece of plasticard to spread the resin over and into the surface of the cloth resulting in an almost opaque finish with the weave showing through. You do need to have a good surface to work with as any imperfections will show when the resin hardens. Once dry give a light sanding all over to remove any imperfections and fill any holes with car body filler and sand smooth. I then apply a very thin top coat of the resin using a brush. When dry use wet and dry to sand and if necessary apply further thin coats until you have the finish you require. I have a local supplier and if you visit the site http://www.resin-supplie s.co.uk/product.htm all the resins/cloths etc are listed. Using Google should bring up a local supplier. you do need to follow the safety instructions to protect yourself and wear appropriate protection for your hands, eyes and breathing, it is also best to apply in a well ventilated area and not on a cold day. The end result will be well worth the effort to keep your tug waterproof. You could also paint the resin over thye inside of the hull to protect the wood from any water that doeos find its way inside. Dave

Fiberglassing by sonar Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Resin and Glass fiber Tissue. The tissue will just hold the resin and give a good seal. Wet the area with resin first..... then lay over the tissue. The tissue does have a certain amount of stretch to it. Easy to join just tear the edges and dab on with resin using . soft brush. Very soft stippling required. The grp Tissue has NO strength to it as is NOT structural just used to get a smoother Finish when Laminating Grp Not Easy to apply but easy to sand off if you make an error.

Sad News by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Ed What a bummer. I agree with Mark on how to find the leak(s). I have looked back over your blog and on page three you mentioned the plasticard hull had split and you showed a pic and the subsequent repair. I suspect this or a similar joint where the plasticard is bent may be your problem. You have mentioned resin covering but this may not have been possible. What glue did you use? Plastic can be difficult to glue. Stablitz Express was the best when I used to build the Robbe and Graupner model planes. Not cheap but works. UHU Plus Acrylit ( a direct substitute) is available in the UK, Leeds Model Centre http://www.modelshopleeds.co.u k/ have stock, use the site search to find it. Hope you find and cure. Dave

OSA 2 Scratch Build Missile Boat by clogboy Seaman   Posted: 1 month ago
Received the MB March edition in the mail yesterday. I was pleasantly surprised Dave Wooley decided to scratch build a Russian OSA 2 Missile Boat. I started a similar project late last year. Like Dave, I had no plans and only very few photos (only pictures from the static plastic Merit kit). My hull is a modified version of Glynn Guest's MTB (MB2009 edition). The hull is enlarged by 15% from the original plan, the additional front deck of the Vosper MTB is eliminated plus I modified the top half of the hull to obtain a more "v" shaped look. Model is all balsa and hull is cured with old panty hose and resin. First tests in pond were positive, aside from Antenna breaking off on maiden voyage. Superstructure need further work but might wait till I see Dave's ideas for further inspiration. I've got 2 other models in my dock yard so plenty on hands anyway. Cheers from Newcastle Australia. J.

Ballast for Puffer by RHBaker Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Suggest try a mixture of old car wheel weights. The radial ones are usually good where they can be slide in and for more congested spaces use the square stick on ones. Most tyre companies are only too pleased to get rid of them. Leave them to soak in paint stripper, wash well in cold water and most of the old paint and adhesive will come off. The remainder can be got off with mechanical endeavours. Once located, saturate in glass fibre resin and they are fastened in for life. If they need to be removable use double sided tape.

built from scratch by Patto Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 5/10] 15" built from scratch Single Propellor Direct Drive Powered by NiCad (1.2v) Batteries - Comments: This is an unfinished boat i started making for my grandson about 3 years ago. I had it running in the swimming pool with 1 AA battery temperately wired up to the motor. It is made out of balsa and coated in resin

cabin cruiser by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi aeromodeller Welcome to the site. Sounds like a good project. Delaminated wood is not good so I hope your glue and clamps will fix the problem. Is the hull painted? It is usually best to strip back to the wood and cover with cloth and resin all over plus more resin on the inside to keep the water away from the wood. With your timescale this may not be an option, but you could possibly tissue cover the hull with sanding sealer/dope then repaint. Even a coat of dope on the inside will help. You will need a brushless ESC with reverse. If the propshaft is damaged or you can feel play in the bearings it may need replacing or new bearings fitted to the proptube. The rudder will need a servo and you should be good to go. Not sure of the price of crystals but you can buy 2.4Ghz cheap combo set for about £20 and even the short range will not be a problem for a model boat. A pic will allow more specific support for the model Dave