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>> Home > Tags > resin

resin
aliphatic resin glue
epoxy resin
resin
Motor, mount & prop-shaft. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
The prop-shaft, coupling and motor mount that I ordered from ModelBoatBits has arrived so it seems a good a good time to make up a supporting wedge for the mount to fix to. I do have a rigid brass motor alignment aid that I used when building the Crash Tender but do you think I can find it in the workshop?....nope! 😡 I expect it will turn up when I need it least! 🤞 Not wanting to waste time I used a length of heat shrink tubing over the motor coupling to make it as rigid as possible, a trick I had seen done elsewhere, and this enabled me to position the motor on its mount in the desired position and measure the angle that the mounting wedge needs to be made to. I used an offcut of beech that I had in the workshop which I cut to size and then shaped it on the rotary sander that I bought in Lidl, fantastic piece of kit !!. The wedge was then drilled to take the nylon motor mount and also the fixing screws that pass through the beech block, through the balsa base of the box and into the ply reinforcing plate that I put in during early construction of the hull. After cleaning up the hole through the keel the prop-shaft was keyed with some abrasive, smeared with some epoxy and then pushed through to mate with the motor coupling. I used the excess epoxy resin around the shaft inside the hull and used some packing tape to stop it running out when I inverted the hull to seal the lower end. A quick spin on the motor confirmed that the alignment was spot-on and the hull set aside while the epoxy set. The next step will be to plank the deck.

Glassfibre cloth & epoxy resin by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
To those intending to glass a hull, take Robs advise I did and it works fine, it's tempting to load more resin on at the brushing in stage but DON'T

Glassfibre cloth & epoxy resin by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
I used glassfibre cloth and epoxy resin successfully when building my 46” RAF Crash Tender and I chose to do the same with the Police Boat. See: https://model-boats.com/builds/view/23951 for the Crash Tender blog. The application of the cloth and resin serves to strengthen the hull enormously and produces a completely watertight hull, and after additional coats of resin are applied and sanded between coats resulting in a surface that is absolutely smooth and the perfect substrate for the subsequent paint process. With the benefit of my previous experience and greater confidence working with these materials I used a ‘fast’ hardener with the resin which gives a working time of 30 minutes and a much shorter curing time where previously I had used a 90 minute ‘slow’ hardener. The basic process is to cut the cloth roughly to shape with a good margin of overlap and then use masking tape along one edge so that after the resin has been brushed onto the hull the cloth can just be lifted over onto the resin. I then lightly brush the cloth into the resin and push the cloth into any tight angles, without any further resin on the brush, until the weave of the cloth is filled and there are no air pockets and the cloth is completely flat. At this point DO NO MORE as the resin will start to harden and any more fiddling with it will cause the cloth to lift and bubble, less is definitely more in this instance. The resin should cure completely overnight and can be trimmed with a sharp blade. I tend to cover a hull in five stages, as there are five ‘faces’ to the hull and thus it’s a five day process for me, this may be time consuming but I think the results are worth the effort. I will brush on two further coats of resin when the rubbing strakes and gunwales have been added, this will completely fill the weave of the cloth to create a nice flat surface but it’s essential to rub down each coat after curing. All the materials were bought from ‘Easy Composites’ https://www.easycomposites.co.uk

The bow blocks & outer keel by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
Hi samc. I'm just writing the blog entry for the hull glassing process and I'll detail the material and process, it's very much the same as the I did on my 46" RAF Crash Tender blog, see here: https://model-boats.com/builds/view/23951 Are you doing this on your hull or the decks, and what materials are you using ? I'm also using Zpoxy finishing resin on the Police Boat and that's going on OK without any problems. Robbob.

general help by Philg7mwh Apprentice   Posted: 13 days ago
Hi All, i know i'm doing this back to front, but decided to build a yacht, just over 40 inches long, i have no plans and no idea what i'm doing, but i have so far made the hull, i sawed up some scrap wood for planking and have it resined so the wood shows through, will glass the inside, i'm about to construct a cantilever keel, should be fun, have aluminium mast and boom, think that's what its called, what i want are recommendations as to where to buy things like goose necks and all the other paraphernalia mail order if possible in the UK. thanks Phil

The bow blocks & outer keel by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
The bow of the boat has a compound curve and to create the shape a single block of hard balsa is supplied in the kit, although in my pre-production prototype this had to be formed by laminating some pieces of thick balsa together to the required size. Rather than laminating up a single block separately I did the laminating and glueing in situ on the hull to ensure a solid tight block, and after the glue had cured I set about shaping it. Initially I used a razor saw to roughly remove the surplus at the sides and bottom and then began the process of shaping it to the final form. My sanding plate proved invaluable for the final stages of making the block flush with the hull sides. The underside of the blocks were very carefully shaped with a combination of the sanding plate and abrasive paper around a series large round formers. I was careful not to just use abrasive paper over fingers as this can create grooves and unevenness in the soft balsa. I had already created a concave shape in the bulkhead former F1 and with the ply bottom skins in place it was relatively easy to extend the contour into the bow blocks being very careful to ensure symmetry on both sides. A line was drawn on the blocks that extended the curve of the hull strakes to define the shape. I also used the outer keel as a template throughout the shaping process to make sure that I was not removing too much material. It would be very easy to remove too much material so it pays to do this slowly and carefully, checking all the time for symmetry. Finally when I was happy with the shape I formed a slight flat on the blocks for the outer keel to sit on, using a back light helped greatly with this, and the whole hull was given a light sanding with a detail sander. The prototype kit was supplied with keel components made from thick balsa which would easily be damaged in use so I recreated this in thick ply laminations to the required thickness and shaped it so that it was completely flat and square on the inner edges and with a curved profile on its outer edges. The keel was checked for fit on the hull throughout so that only a minimum amount of filler would be required to blend it to the hull. It was fixed in place with epoxy adhesive and firmly pinned until it fully set and very little filler used to finish it. The kit, which is available now from VMW, includes a single piece bow block and ply keel parts as standard, which makes construction much quicker and easier. I’m glad that bit is over and I’m very pleased with the result. Next stage will be glass fibre cloth and epoxy resin….

Paint finish for warships by drspock Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 16 days ago
I am building a 1/24 th scale Perkasa,but this recommendation applies to any warship. Autotek etch primer covers anything with even one coat,and, as an etch primer is good for any substrate including galvanised , ally, plastic / resin.It has an authentic Matt finish,and one squirt repairs any building marks.When finished, I will laquer with Autotek MATT laquer. Find it on ebay at about £10.50 for two 500ml cans! Use in well ventilated room,it is acidic!

Crack in Seam Update! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Star date 29.12.18 Supplemental 00.52 😁 I hope it works too Ed. 👍 Don't forget to seal any exposed wood before dunking it again. And I would recommend putting all the ballast and batteries back in (at least loosely) to recreate actual sailing conditions; i.e. water pressure on the potential leak area. I wondered why you went to such lengths anyway. Had similar problems with the restorations of my Sea Scout and fish cutter. I simply soaked the affected areas in resin, inside and out, while holding in clamps. Sand, fill (Bondo?😁), sand, paint and Bob's yer uncle and Fanny's yer Aunt 😁😁 Nevertheless; hope it works for you Ed, cheers, Doug 😎

Excelsior by Gascoigne Captain   Posted: 29 days ago
Hi Joe, In answer to your queries, Hull was built in the bread and butter system using deal sealed inside and out with coats of yacht varnish and painted using acrylic. Subsequent models of Wherries and Chinese Junks were plank on frame using 1/8” balsa strips sealed with resin,varnish inside and out, with again acrylic paint. Balsa easier to work with to gain experience - reasonable effectiveness both in carvel and clinker planking. All the best and good sailing. Gascoigne

Rear deck continued by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 30 days ago
The rear deck has a few features that need to be done to finish the deck. 1) The hatch part needs the magnets putting in to hold it in place, which requires the deck to be milled out to accept the magnets. Having milled the recess out in both the base and the hatch in four places the magnets can be epoxied in the base. Now these have been set in place the upper magnets can be placed on top of the base magnets to get the correct orientation and glued in place, but I made sure to place some silicon baking paper between the magnets so they don’t accidently get stuck together (with epoxy). 2) The handles and recess to lift the decks out have to be milled out. Using a 2 mm slot drill I cut a 10mm x 5mm 1.5 mm deep recess in 4 places. Each recess has two holes drilled in the corners to accept the brass handles which will be epoxied in later 3) There are two drains at the rear of the deck. These were made from a machined piece of tube, which had vee groves milled in one end to accept a 1.5 mm brass rod in each, which were then soldered in place. After some cleaning up of the excess solder the underside was filled in using epoxy resin coloured black (with Graphite) to simulate a dark hole. The ends were then machined flat, polished, and finally epoxied into the deck. 4) Finally the foam tanks need to be secured, once again using round magnets this time , they are sunk into the deck and similarly the opposing magnets are sunk into the base of each foam tank, this gives a real sturdy fastening the tanks jump into position as soon as they are placed near their position. 5) The deck has had a number of clear lacquer coats during manufacture so now for a couple of final coats.

Ship rudders by Toby Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Thanks R in Munich! The shapes of brackets under the rivets are cut out from a sheet of fibre glass. Depending on contour held in place with a dab of CA or the finishing resin, then topped with finishing resin. I have now to decide if I use the rivet method for the reset of the ship. The hull effect was via dabbing pva glue but some spread slightly and thus look over scale on some. 1mm ~50mm so a rivet head spreading to 2-3mm ~ 100-150 and I think a 6" rivet head might be unrealistic? What was ther likely rivet head size on such ships. Toby

Ship rudders by Toby Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Four of the five rudder post hinges made and prepared for epoxy finishing resin and rivet detail.

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Back to the build. Next milestone, to complete the superstructure and engine covers. The superstructure is essentially a cowl that supports the open bridge and serves as the air intake for the gas turbines. The engine covers fit into the rear of it. The superstructure is full of curves and will be interesting to make. Still trying to save weight, decided to make it out of glassfibre. Rather than first make a plug then a female mould and finally the cowl, wanted to try the technique of making a plug out of styrene foam sheet, then covering it in a glass fibre matt. Once the glass fibre is set, the foam is dissolved out using a solvent and the cowl remains – Inshallah! To ensure the foam did not react to the glass fibre resin, painted the finished cowl with enamel paint before sticking the matt down. See pictures. What a mess! The resin had crept under the paint and into the foam dissolving it. When the resin dried the plug had shrunk slightly and had the surface finish of a quarry. First thought was to hurl it and start again, this time in wood. On second thoughts, wondered if the plug could still be used. Decided to build it up with wood filler and from it make a female mould, as originally intended. The cowl would then be made from the mould. Built the damaged plug up and sanded it smooth. As the plug would be covered in fibreglass, the surface finish was not critical. Brushed a coat of fibreglass on the plug and, after drying filled any defects with glaze putty and sanded smooth. Once the finish and dimensions were satisfactory, applied a thicker coat of glass fibre to the plug. This was again smoothed down, waxed with carnauba polish and then covered in mould release. From it the cowl was made. Picture shows plug, mould and cowl placed side by each. The cowl requires reinforcement; the fittings and various mountings then adding before installing. A trial installation showed that it fitted properly the deck and was accurate. A lesson for the next time is to make the plug and mould much deeper than the finished item. That will allow any rough edges, on either the mould or the component, to be trimmed off leaving a smooth fibreglass edge.

Ship rudders by Toby Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Remember I am using a mobile so nothing appears such as modify etc. There is little functionality across the website via smart phone. Toby. You are doing your night owl stint too. Well I have just coated the rudder in finishing resin and so bedtime. Undercoat in the morning.....oops it is morning already. Bis bald! Toby

Ship rudders by Toby Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Two wooden pieces, steel rod, each hinge 3mm i/d brass tube, shaped with filler and then each hinge covered and the shape made using Strips of five glass and epoxy finishing resin. File to suit. Pins for hinges clevis type 3mm.