Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
August 2017: 8 people
July 2017: 16 people
June 2017: 8 people
May 2017: 8 people
April 2017: 23 people
March 2017: 9 people
February 2017: 12 people
January 2017: 16 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (22)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > roof

roof
roof
fibre glass or not by reilly4 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 days ago
Hi Fred, This all depends on the size and structure of the boat and the type of timber used as a skin. Fibreglass is generally used to strengthen and waterproof the boat.

Logos etc by Trillium Commander   Posted: 4 days ago
My preferred logo paper is the white waterproof adhesive-backed vinyl made by Papilio for inkjet printers. http://www.papilio.com/inkjet%20waterp style='background-color:yellow;'>roof%20adhesive%20film%20media.html. You may find a supplier in the UK - which is where I presume you are. A UV-resistant spray is all that is recommended. Its adhesive is far superior to that on waterslide transfer paper. Roy

Decks by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
Some info. on radar, armament and wartime mods! 'Ya pays ya money and yer takes yer choice'! 😎 "Armament, electronics and protection The main armament of the Illustrious class consisted of sixteen quick-firing (QF) 4.5-inch (110 mm) dual-purpose guns in eight twin-gun turrets, four in sponsons on each side of the hull. The roofs of the gun turrets protruded above the level of the flight deck to allow them to fire across the deck at high elevations.[11] The gun had a maximum range of 20,760 yards (18,980 m).[12] Her light anti-aircraft defences included six octuple mounts for QF 2-pounder ("pom-pom") anti-aircraft (AA) guns, two each fore and aft of the island and two in sponsons on the port side of the hull.[11] The 2-pounder gun had a maximum range of 6,800 yards (6,200 m).[13] The completion of Illustrious was delayed two months to fit her with a Type 79Z early-warning radar; she was the first aircraft carrier in the world to be fitted with radar before completion.[11] This version of the radar had separate transmitting and receiving antennas which required a new mainmast to be added to the aft end of the island to mount the transmitter.[14] The Illustrious-class ships had a flight deck protected by 3 inches (76 mm) of armour and the internal sides and ends of the hangars were 4.5 inches (114 mm) thick. The hangar deck itself was 2.5 inches (64 mm) thick and extended the full width of the ship to meet the top of the 4.5-inch waterline armour belt. The belt was closed by 2.5-inch transverse bulkheads fore and aft. The underwater defence system was a layered system of liquid- and air-filled compartments backed by a 1.5-inch (38 mm) splinter bulkhead.[15] Wartime modifications While under repair in 1941, Illustrious's rear "round-down" was flattened to increase the usable length of the flight deck to 670 feet (204.2 m).[16] This increased her aircraft complement to 41 aircraft by use of a permanent deck park.[17] Her light AA armament was also augmented by the addition of 10 Oerlikon 20 mm autocannon in single mounts with a maximum range of 4,800 yards (4,400 m).[18] In addition the two steel fire curtains in the hangar were replaced by asbestos ones.[19] After her return to the UK later that year, her Type 79Z radar was replaced by a Type 281 system and a Type 285 gunnery radar was mounted on one of the main fire-control directors.[16] The additional crewmen, maintenance personnel and facilities needed to support these aircraft, weapons and sensors increased her complement to 1,326.[7] During her 1943 refits, the flight deck was modified to extend its usable length to 740 feet (225.6 m), and "outriggers" were probably added at this time. These were 'U'-shaped beams that extended from the side of the flight deck into which aircraft tailwheels were placed. The aircraft were pushed back until the main wheels were near the edge of the flight deck to allow more aircraft to be stored on the deck. Twin Oerlikon mounts replaced most of the single mounts. Other twin mounts were added so that by May she had a total of eighteen twin and two single mounts. The Type 281 radar was replaced by an upgraded Type 281M, and a single-antenna Type 79M was added. Type 282 gunnery radars were added for each of the "pom-pom" directors, and the rest of the main directors were fitted with Type 285 radars. A Type 272 target-indicator radar was mounted above her bridge.[16] These changes increased her aircraft capacity to 57[20] and caused her crew to grow to 1,831.[7] A year later, in preparation for her service against the Japanese in the Pacific, one starboard octuple "pom-pom" mount, directly abaft the island, was replaced by two 40 mm Bofors AA guns;[21] which had a maximum range of 10,750 yards (9,830 m).[22] Two more twin Oerlikon mounts were added, and her boilers were retubed.[21] At this time her complement was 1,997 officers and enlisted men.[7] By 1945, accumulated wear-and-tear as well as undiagnosed shock damage to Illustrious's machinery caused severe vibrations in her centre propeller shaft at high speeds. In an effort to cure the problem, the propeller was removed, and the shaft was locked in place in February; these radical measures succeeded in reducing, but not eliminating, the vibrations and reduced the ship's speed to about 24 knots (44 km/h; 28 mph).["

huntsman plan by Black Dog Jack Seaman   Posted: 9 days ago
Model Boats magazine January 2016 ncluded a free plan of a Huntsman 31 complete with photos and a step by step build guide. Unfortunately the model is 24". I also wanted a bigger model so I redrew the plan double size. It wasn't too difficult and only took a couple of evenings with a some lining paper from B&Q and a calculator and voila! At the moment I am planking the roof of the cabins and trying to decide between a brushless motor and an old Weston rare earth brushed motor I used to use for fast electrics. The article in MB also ran into February 2016 where all the fiddly finishing bits were described, also with many photos. I expect one can obtain back issues from their web site. Anyone interested in Huntsmen should get these two issues for the detail alone.

Window Repairs by rolfman2000 Commander   Posted: 11 days ago
I picked up a 46" Huntsman yesterday, so i have the same sort of restoration as you have, but bigger 😕 First thing to sort is the "started" planning on the decking. There must be somewhere I can buy strips of timber to plank with to save making my own. And what does one use to represent the black interplank waterproofing ? Otherwise I have to take off the bits already glued on. Cheers guys, Dave W 😊

waterproofing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Hi eric Welcome to the site. What type of boat have you bought? Is it a plastic, fibreglass or wood hull? Can you post a pic? We need a bit more detail please so we can give useful advice Dave

What motor have I got? by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Good pics 👍 At first look I would say two are identical, the 'mucky' one without the outer jacket (improves the magnetic field) is probably not. Even if it is the same type without the jacket it will not perform the same. Proof of the pudding will be in the testing, preferably with a Watt meter. The red dot signifies the positive terminal for normal (forward) rotation as brushed motors have a preferred direction due to the brush wear - Bedding In! Many don't like running backwards for long periods or at high speed. The fact that the mucky one has a gear fitted also hints that it may have different parameters. For a twin screw setup I would use the two with jackets and see how she runs with all trims set to neutral. I'll see if I can trace the type/serial number visible on the mucky one. Cheers Doug 😎

waterproofing by ericrw Apprentice   Posted: 11 days ago
I have unknowingly bought a boat with hull painted black, which is not waterproofed. Advice please ! Eric.

Deck Planking by canabus Commander   Posted: 17 days ago
Hi Guys Well I installed the aft deck and started planking. The outer trim planking is in two pieces with a joint behind the windscreen because my mate gave me the veneer for free. The idea is to hide the joints with black waterproof sandpaper used for the nonslip pieces shown on the plan. Canabus

Stabilit Express by Midlife306 Admiral   Posted: 22 days ago
I think those doublers will need explosives to get them off... I've hit a bit of a roadblock with the big K7, I need to get Donald built up so I can position the steering wheel & dash correctly, the animatronic resin upper torso & arms I bought came with no instructions or info on what servos to use. I got some micro servos & they didn't fit, Dremel out & all fits now but I'm now struggling with connecting the servo arm to the rotating neck. I'll suss it out eventually but I need a rest. I've been doing bits on my 1/12 scale K7 in the background, if all goes well it should be ready for paint in a couple of weeks. As normal I've been waiting for parts to arrive from China, the brushless motor & esc arrived today for the blue rigger, I can make a start on that soon.. I've just finished printing the parts for the cabin for a Springer tug hull I got from Sonar & I've just started printing the first parts of a WW2 landing craft, its 1/16 scale nearly a metre long, I guess I'll be making a tank for it when it's completed. Then there's the Robbe Diabolo, on the instructions it says to use self tapping screws to hold the plastic dual rudders in place. No good to me as I've upgraded to dual aluminium rudders, these buggers need bolts! Trouble is the waterproof electronics box is used as a doubler for the central transom, when it's glued into place there isn't any room to access where the rudder bolts come through the doublers, ohhh the joy of problem solving.... So I'm keeping busy but my butter is spread a bit too thin. Cheers Wayne

Sea Queen refurbishment by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Thanks Dave, yes the old lady is now stable and solid enough to work on. Have a few new bits to make, two cabin roof's and may even re-deck her as the balsa deck has lots of damage and filler would not look good so get family to grab a few handfuls of coffee stirers as they make great deck planks. I am going to put dads 27mhz radio system back in. Then decide which motor is best suited. By the way I still DON'T HAVE A PC. The shop said it has gone past repair so I'll have to save up for a replacement. Unless I find one on free cycle.

eezebuild RAF tender by marky Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
did another wee bit today ,decided to glaze the windows before assembling a bit tricky but a 7 year olds fingers come in handy, the windscreen went together quite well the roofs fitted reasonably well ,may put a 1mm white plastic roof over the mdf ones .had some nice oak strip so decided to plank the aft deck ,the forth picture shows the amended bow(not fitted) im not an expert but I prefer the original that I had fitted prior to knowing there was a mk2

Sea Queen refurbishment by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Step one coated inside of hull with polyester resin, poured in and rotated till all surfaces were coated. Poured excess into baking tray lined with greaseproof paper and mixed it with sand and left to set (later to be cut into small sections to use as ballast weights) Now leave for two days to fully cure before painting with White Hamerite.

Secure the hatches and raise the flags ! by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Having spent so much time adding fittings and detail to the removable cabin roofs and hatches the last thing I want is for them to be dislodged and see them sink without trace 😱! Having used some amazingly strong neodymium magnets to hold the foam tanks securely in the rear well I was confident that they would be more than powerful enough to hold the various roofs and hatches in place so I scoured eBay for some suitable sizes and shapes. I settled on two sizes, 25x6x3mm and 12x6x3mm and ordered 10 of each, more than I need but so useful to have in the bits box. A word of caution with these magnets, always slide them apart and avoid letting them crash together as the impact can easily break them into pieces, as I discovered. Thankfully I have some spares ! For the engine roof magnets I made a couple of small plywood brackets into which the larger magnets are fixed with epoxy and these were in turn epoxied onto the inside faces of the engine room walls. The mating magnets were let into the underside of the roof frame and firmly glued in place after double checking the mating polarity and orientation. An identical method was used for the forward cabin roof but using the smaller magnets. For the removable panel in the centre section over the motor I used a single pair of small magnets on the rear edge only as the front of this panel is held under the cabin door in a rebated part of the floor that forms the threshold of the door. I had to fit a small brass handle in the rear of this panel so that I could pull the panel up and away as there is no other means of doing so without, I made a ‘hook tool’ from some brass wire for this purpose. The floor panel in the rear cockpit is secured on it’s rear edge by a pair of the larger magnets, the forward edge being held down by the towing hook bracing stays. The removable hatch in the rear cockpit floor was also fitted with two pairs of the smaller magnets let into the underside of the hatch and the hatch framing of the floor. One of the brass handles that I that had previously set into the hatch was bent up slightly so that I could use my brass ‘hook tool’ to release it from the magnets hold. So now all the roofs and hatches are firmly secured by the concealed magnets and are easily removable without any fiddly catches or fixings and now there’s now very little chance of them coming adrift and disappearing! The final finishing detail are the two RAF ensigns, one on the mast and one on the stern flagstaff. The ensigns were made by Mike Allsop Scale Flags & Ensigns who was very helpful and advised me on the most suitable sizes for the 1:12 scale of my boat. His flags are extremely well made, excellent value for money and look very realistic when flying and fluttering !! Mike can be contacted at: scaleflags@outlook.com or by telephone on 01476 573331 They are hand made from a fine and flexible silk cloth that behaves like a real flag even in a slight breeze and are easy to fix with diluted PVA glue. The smaller flag was fitted to the lanyard on the mast as described in the supplied instruction sheet. The ensign on the stern flagstaff was very carefully formed and glued so that the flag was not fixed in one place and could rotate around the shaft of the flagstaff as this piece screws into a brass fitting on the rear deck and this will ensure that it will always find it’s own position. A small brass ring was formed and glued to the flagstaff below the ensign so it would always stay at the top and not slip down. So, all hatches battened down, flags raised and ready for action. That’s just about everything finished now barring any trimming and ballasting required and is ready for it’s maiden voyage. I hope that all of you that have been following my blog have had as much enjoyment reading about my build as I have had in the building and finishing process 😁 And a big thank you to all that have contributed so much with encouraging comments, suggestions and advice 👏 😍

The electrics, drive & radio by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
The switch panel and wiring loom was made, tested and dry fitted a while ago and so it only needs securing to the bulkhead with four fixing screws, the two NiMh batteries were strapped down to the bearers with cable ties as close to the chines as possible and the XT60 connectors mated. I have read that placing the heavy batteries as far away from the keel as possible improves the handling, all other heavy items are centered along the keel for symmetry and should help the boat to sit evenly in the water. I’m not sure if I will need to do any ballasting, hopefully the maiden voyages should give me an indication. The prop shaft was greased and fitted, and with the prop, thrust washers and lock nuts in place, the clearance was adjusted and locked with some Loctite so the motor could then be installed. The initial motor alignment was made with a solid coupler which was then replaced with the universal joint, I took the precaution to grind a flat on the motor shaft so that the locking grub screw has better grip on the shaft. The grease tube was then fitted to the shaft clamp and secured to the side of the switch panel. The ESC was fixed to the back of the bulkhead with another couple of cable ties and the input cables, again XT60 types, and the three pole XT60 motor connectors mated. I have also fitted a Turnigy in-line volt, amp and watt meter in the circuit before the ESC so that I can log readings in case of spurious fuse blowing issues or unexpected battery life problems. The water cooling tubes were then run from the water pickup, through the ESC and then back to the transom ‘exhaust’ outlet, all water connections are fitted with spring clips to ensure water tight connections. I have used quite a large bore silicone tubing to ensure maximum water flow and made sure that all bends are kink and compression free. The R/C receiver is fixed to the rear cabin wall with some Velcro pads for easy removal, the two aerials were fitted in some plastic tubing at 90 degrees to each other as recommended for 2.4 gig systems and as high above the waterline as possible. The receiver is connected to a separate 4.8 volt NiMh battery via a changeover switch that also has a charging connection and LED power indicator, and I have also fitted a battery voltage indicator, just because they are cheap and convenient although the R/C system that I have has telemetry that reports RX voltage as standard. The battery charger I have chosen can handle the 16 cell series configuration of the drive batteries and so they can be charged in-situ when the main power switch is toggled over to the charge position. The RX and lighting batteries are charged separately. All of the servo and lighting switch cables are routed through the hull to the receiver through pre drilled holes in the bulkheads at high level for neatness and to retain the integrity of each compartment just in case 😲!!. The servo and cables and the water cooling tubes are strapped to a supporting bar between the bulkheads for neatness and security. With the TX switched on first, the RX is then powered up and the main power switch toggled to the ‘operate’ position, the ESC then gives a reassuring series of bleeps that confirm that all is well. The ESC was set up using a Turnigy programming card specifically for that model of controller and if required I can tweak the settings once the boat has had a few sailings. The last things to do now are to fit some strong magnets to hold the hatches and roofs down securely and then finally raise the RAF ensigns 😁