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>> Home > Tags > roof

roof
roof
Sails for Vanity by kmbcsecretary Admiral   Posted: 1 day ago
Just a thought Martin on the wherry sails , have you thought of using boot polish to colour the sail. As you probably know that the original wherry sail started of white and it was only the waterproofing treatment they used that turned the sails black. Ron

boiler by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
Boiler complete just the pipe work to do when the engine installed. No clack feed as will remove safety valve to fill, & turn the boat over to empty, although there is a valve on the sight glass. Sorry about the shadow across the makers plate, which is level although doesn't look like it in photo. Boiler room roof tin plate finished & painted (after photo). Skylight & hatch made to open, to allow air to burner.

Vanity, Victorian Cutter by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
R/C gear going in on a 2 piece plank, so it'll fit through the hatches. Some deck planks going on, king plank too. Coamings to help water proof from splash. These are Foamex, completely waterproof stuff. The hatches and houses will be fitted with magnets eventually. The planking is NOT a la yacht. For some reason Dan Hatcher laid deck planks like workboats and motor boats, parallel to the King plank, not the covering boards. Believe me when you've lived on one of these and put every pot you have under the deck leaks when it rains, you know the pattern of the laid deck! Rear deck half just rested on as the R/C gear is yet to be finished. Waiting for some more allly tube to guide the steering cables and braided line for the sheet control. Steering servo coming this afternoon. Martin

It's a sad day!. by stormin Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 7 days ago
Hi Les, funny we've come full circle, I started my model sailing at newsham park back in the late 50s and was there at the beginning of "The Liverpool model POWER boat club back in 1964, when I was 14 years old. Notice the power was omitted from the clubs name approx' 15 years ago. In 1964 i had just completed my first aerokits sea scout complet with an ED seagull 1cc diesel, this club was where I met most of my mentors and founder members of the club, Jimmy Wilson, Cliff'Broadbent, Monty, Oscar Poulson etc etc all now sadly gone to that big lake in the sky where anything goes. I'm in southport now and do go back to newsham from time to time. Thank you for that bit of very interesting info'. The afore mentioned sea scout has just undergone a major re-fit after 55 years, the 1cc diesel has been replaced with a 3940 kv brushless and 60 esc running on 11.1 lipo, yes I know all to big for a little 24inch sea scout, but as the yanks would say " there ain't no substitute for C.C. Boy", you don't have to use it but nice to have. Martin you mentioned the old glue used in those days, the sea scout I made was glued using "caskomite" (can't remember the correct spelling) the boat is still 100% waterproof with no skin separation at all, I do not intend tarting the boat up at all, prefer to keep it the way a 14 year old boy (me) had made it apart from bringing the running gear up to 21st century and something that can be used at my local lakes. Norman.

Totnes Castle 1894 by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
Change of plan, bent up tin plate angle to strengthen the sides on boiler room roof. Milling the brass would be wasteful I don't like waste. Another thing I disliked was the safety valve not being upright. So made a angle fitting, turned the male end in normal manner & parted off. Set in pillar drill at the required angle drilled down to meet the hole from other end. Started tap wile still in drill (by hand) then completed with wrench. Threaded a bar to fit & attached fitting in lathe, turned so the safety valve fitted flat.

It's a sad day!. by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
Yep, built mine with my Dad, a 34" Crash Tender. We used the then new PVA glue and to be honest, 54 years later it still holds well and is waterproof. I really must finish it some day! I confess I never had an IC engine in a boat, but I've always had an ED Racer with water jacket and big brass flywheel. Still have it on my shelf with others, but I could never get the buggers to start! So Dad made sure the Crash Tender had a good electric motor when he spoiled me with it all for my 11th Christmas. I had REP single channel R/C and a Taycol Supermarine motor and Taycol coupling. That's what's in it and will stay in it. Alas the R/C gear was stolen. I could replicate the case, but there just ain't the time for all these things, so an old Mini Hex 1970s Propo set will go in it as a classic curio. I used it for years with the REP on the oyster ponds at Paglesham. Left, centre, right, centre, wiggle right, wiggle right and so on. The Taycol ate batteries! Martin

Vanity, Victorian Cutter by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Thanks, I used to make top end model furniture for the Home Miniaturists. It's my way of finding a connection with my cabinet maker Granddad, who was a big model boat fan too, in fact he was a founder member of the Victoria Model Steamboat Club. She is 48x9x11 plus bowsprit. Height of rig is about 4 feet also. And yes the fitting on the keel is a piece of ally box section cut in half so it becomes U section, drilled through at equal spacing for the fin keel. Then the U section is screwed with brass screws and Marineflex sealer/adhesive to the keel, which is all solid hardwood. I did my sums and gave up, so once she was waterproof I put her in my son's fish pond and kept piling stuff in until she floated on her marks. Rigging won't be that heavy, but I made an allowance for it. Once it was floating right it turned out to need 14 1/2lbs. of ballast. BUT, that's inside. On the end of a 15" inch(ish) fin it will be less. I have 2 half bulbs cast by my other son in his back garden from my patterns. They will be bolted to the fin and faired in. Cheers, Martin

Sea Commander restoration tips by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Get yourself a small pack of epoxy resin from ebay and seek out all slight delaminations of the plywood frames. Get the epoxy in those split bits and clamp them up. A clothes peg is sufficient if you're short of space. You can put a piece of cling film twixt peg and wood so the peg doesn't stick. Then use the rest of the epoxy to waterproof the insides. Be thorough and methodical. If you sand the model back to wood, use epoxy on that, either through fine model aircraft fibreglass cloth or just squeegee epoxy on all over with an old credit card. It goes much further and gets forced into the grain. It's not necessary to use GRP cloth on everything if it's well built. I have several over-50 year old model boats that are perfectly water tight with decent paint jobs (enamel, of course). Cheers, Martin

It's a sad day!. by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
Ooh, is that a Westbury Sealion? Lovely. Have you ever tried asking the parky for proof? I did that with some jobswuff fishing geezer where we were running ICs on a river. He ummed and ahed and then buggered off. I say use em, but on your own, not as part of a club. Use public waters, canals, or sympathetic farmers' reservoirs. But use them until some cocky tosser can actually wave the relevant bit of paper under your nose. You'll be amazed how many cannot do so. And as for the 80 quid fine? I think you'll find that's rubbish. It's more than a standing fine from a copper for some things, so most unlikely and unless there are very clear signs saying the same at the waterside they can't touch you. Blackheath used to have tethered hydros. John Cobb learned about sponsons from my old boss, Mike Karslake, at Blackheath. They exchanged info on a regular basis. If you want to run IC in London go to Victoria Park, they still allow it. My Granddad was a founder member of it, the world's oldest model power boat club. But the essence is....USE THEM and wait for the jobswuff to prove otherwise and I mean PROVE! Of course, if you're happy to roll over and play dead, you deserve to be shit on. I don't have the problem. I live with rivers all round me and I wouldn't want to mix with the model boaties round here! The clubs are way too far away and difficult to get to and expensive! Martin

Fibreglass the hull by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
That looks painful, I will take your advice and do the deck and superstructure reinforcement as well as the nose. I've already done the roof and its certainly strengthened it really well.

Fibreglass the hull by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
I purchased as recommended by Robbob the fibreglass package which consisted of 750g of epoxy resin and 250g of hardener, I also went for the 90min cure as this is the first time I have ever done a boat hull, I’ve done plenty of stranded fibre cowlings/air intakes etc. where you lay a gel coat first then stranded matting which is so different to laying a fine matt on its own. I also ordered some mixing sticks and throw away brushes. First I cut the matting to the slightly oversize for one of the side skins, then loosely taped the matt to the bottom skin and checked the coverage - and checked again then fold over to the opposite side, this then leaves the surface clear to apply the resin. Mixing the resin should be done accurately, so borrow the kitchen scales and here we go. I wasn’t sure how much to mix for a side skin but 25g of resin and 7.5g of hardener looks about right. So mix well and then brush onto the side skin, then I gently lifted over the matting and laid it on the skin and gently brushed the matting down, the matting is almost sucked onto the resin so minimal brushing is required to ensure a smooth surface A previous blog said that “Less is More” how true this is, the temptation to spread the remainder of the resin on to the already adhered matt is something to be avoided, however learn by my mistake as I did just that (only in a small area on one skin) leaving rather a lot of sanding later after the resin had fully cured as it leaves a rather lumpy surface. So onward and upwards the following three surfaces were relatively easy with only minor difficulty keeping the matting in close to the 90 degree angle between the keel and skin and I had to keep going back to it pressing it in with a steel rule until the resin started to go off but minimal resin left a surface that was flat and the weave of the glass matt can be clearly seen and felt but minimal sanding is required if at all. Then a further 2 coats of resin with sanding in between will leave a smooth surface ready for final preparation of painting. The final picture is of the roof that in a previous page I said to add strength the roof would need a coat of glass to reinforce the unsupported edges – To be continued

boiler by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 16 days ago
Slow progress I am afraid, other things to do. Have soldered up the engine room roof. Need to fix angle along the bottom to keep it straight. Found brass angle in my stock, but it will have to be milled smaller & thinner. Then the safety valve extension.

boiler by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 23 days ago
Started on the boiler room roof. Cardboard patterns, with skylight & access hatch drawn in. The tinplate marked out, rivets punched, folded & soldered on the corners.

Final fitting of cabin roof skins by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 23 days ago
RC roof!? What for? No equivalent in the original, not like a Rhine Schiff with retractable wheelhouse. Unless maybe to 'doff the roof' to the ladies 😉 A sort of Nautical 'Hat's off' 😁

Final fitting of cabin roof skins by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Radio control roof ? not sure about that but yes the cabin is already detailed see earlier in the blog and final pictures will follow when all the metalwork is completed. Roof only opens to be able to see internal detail