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>> Home > Tags > run time

run time
maritime museum
bountiful b 377
run time
6 Volts of Course! by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 hours ago
Captain's Log: Well I found a 6 volt 8.5 amp Battery. For my Brooklyn to use! Just have to order her main motor and a new smoker! Both of which will be at 6 volts! Now, If I've done my math right! And all I use is her main motor. I would end up with about 2.5 hours of run time! But, If I use her main motor and smoke. I will end up with a little over 1.5 hours of run time! I was lucky in that I have a buyer. For her old 12 volt motor and 12 volt smoker! They have about an hour of use! Not exactly what I call used. But, Have to sell as used equipment!

March'71 by Sakibian Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 days ago
[Score: 8/10] 18"/500g March'71 Capable of 9mph and a runtime of 10mins Twin Propellors (3 Blade 25mm) Direct Drive to a 180 brushed motor (3 Blade) Powered by LiPoly (11.1v) 1Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Hnadmade by arduino (30Amps) ESC - Comments: The BEST thing about this one is, she's very smooth on the run. Decent power, makes it more fun. When it turns with speed, gets down like a bike. So that's the time when it leaks a tiny amount of water. Bcz it's not waterproof on the deck. Can take 2s-3s Lipo. Bcz the motors are 3s rated only. Have a plan to change them into better Mabuchi ones.

Weight Too Much! by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
Captain's Log: After careful consideration. I have decided to use only one battery at a time! This being 6.5 lbs. is way too much weight. Her bow is too low to the waterline. She get's thrown off by the weight. So, one battery at a time will be used! Now, having lowered the volts. From 12 volts to 6 volts is a problem. See her main motor and smoker. Are 12 volts each! So, now I have to replace. The main motor and the smoker. To a 6 volt system! This is not so easy. If any of you are familiar. With Dumas and Harbor model products. You know this ain't cheap!😭 Luckily, I will be selling both parts. Together next month! As both parts are in new condition! I will then order a 6 volt main motor and Smoker! Oh, each battery will give me about 1.5 hours of run time! And that's not bad at all..... NOTE: I'm only losing $10.00 on the resale of her Motor and Smoker!

Steam Tug Challenge by wunwinglo Lieutenant   Posted: 24 days ago
[Score: 5/10] 16" Steam Tug Challenge Single Propellor (3 Blade 45mm) Geared to a Ancient Mabuchi (3 Blade) Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) Batteries Controlled Through Motroniks ESC - Comments: This little model was built to see how much my Parkinson's had affected my modelling abilities. Surprisingly little as it turned out but I cannot write legibly and find keyboards tricky too. It must be muscle-memory! The model is loosely based on Challenge and is built around a tug hull that I made as a boy I made in the sixties but with some modification. She is fully lit for night running. The crew figures are model railway lineside track gang models. They have been left in their modern high viz and helmets as the model is depicted as she is today operated in preservation as a Dunkirque little ship. She is equipped with 2 function R/C. She had a short maiden trial on the 29th December, which was very promising but was curtailed by a sloppy rudder.

Day Two Springer by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 27 days ago
Springer build log for website Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe Day 2 Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch plywood from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade drill press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. If you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic, woodworking, etc., a good practice is to use this both adhesive and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate adhesive. Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe

Oh, NO Water Everywhere! by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 27 days ago
Ed, I do want Doug does, attach a silicone tube and run it up and so filling with grease is easy. Periodically, I use a large syringe to apply pressure while running the motor to make certain its getting the grease. As to finding the leaks, next time it gets water in the hull, pick it up with water still in it, dry it off with a towel and lift it up high. Look to see where it's leaking. When I Build fiberglass hulls they look good but I soon learned to fill them with water full. (Prior to putting anything inside) Lift it up and there always a few pin holes in the hull, you never see them normally, but under the water pressure it will shoot tiny stream of water into the air. Mark and patch. Regard, Joe

Rescue Vessel - Springer Tug by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 29 days ago
Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe

steam water pump by GaryLCoupland Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 1 month ago
sent you a photo of a mechanical boiler feed pump connected to an oscillating V4 engine. get on eBay and type in Microcosm steam engines. If you use a decent size boiler for your steam engine you should get 20 to 30 minutes run-time. Let me know how you get on. Regards.

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Back to the build. Next milestone, to complete the superstructure and engine covers. The superstructure is essentially a cowl that supports the open bridge and serves as the air intake for the gas turbines. The engine covers fit into the rear of it. The superstructure is full of curves and will be interesting to make. Still trying to save weight, decided to make it out of glassfibre. Rather than first make a plug then a female mould and finally the cowl, wanted to try the technique of making a plug out of styrene foam sheet, then covering it in a glass fibre matt. Once the glass fibre is set, the foam is dissolved out using a solvent and the cowl remains – Inshallah! To ensure the foam did not react to the glass fibre resin, painted the finished cowl with enamel paint before sticking the matt down. See pictures. What a mess! The resin had crept under the paint and into the foam dissolving it. When the resin dried the plug had shrunk slightly and had the surface finish of a quarry. First thought was to hurl it and start again, this time in wood. On second thoughts, wondered if the plug could still be used. Decided to build it up with wood filler and from it make a female mould, as originally intended. The cowl would then be made from the mould. Built the damaged plug up and sanded it smooth. As the plug would be covered in fibreglass, the surface finish was not critical. Brushed a coat of fibreglass on the plug and, after drying filled any defects with glaze putty and sanded smooth. Once the finish and dimensions were satisfactory, applied a thicker coat of glass fibre to the plug. This was again smoothed down, waxed with carnauba polish and then covered in mould release. From it the cowl was made. Picture shows plug, mould and cowl placed side by each. The cowl requires reinforcement; the fittings and various mountings then adding before installing. A trial installation showed that it fitted properly the deck and was accurate. A lesson for the next time is to make the plug and mould much deeper than the finished item. That will allow any rough edges, on either the mould or the component, to be trimmed off leaving a smooth fibreglass edge.

Broads Light Class Cabin Cruisers by NorfolkBroads Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
Many thanks Richard indeed. Yes, decades of knowing these craft in real form and the designers and builders right back has hugely helped us of course gain such a first class reputation of precise detail. However, like all these things, such has not come without heartache, where in running up a one year purposeful trial as a manufacturing business for these, I simply failed in being far too much of a perfectionist, and this took too long in getting every kit out. Although we perfected the trial run on time for every customer, we realised it could not continue without mass stress for a sustained period of years, and so sadly had to pull the plug on the purposeful trial, much to the disappointment of many potential customers. Broke our hearts too, but then, what were we to do, our pride told us to pull back before running up a full production.

Broads River Cruiser Yachts by NorfolkBroads Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
Many thanks Guys, yes we did a trial business in 2016, to test the market 'Broadland Classics'. The initial runs sold with real enthusiasm, and reported back to us the best they had ever had as kits, however, sadly, my own failure was being far to fussy on getting every kit out more than perfect, and treating the kits as so individual to every customer per real commissions, that I slowed down the production process massively, thus creating self worries on demands, which I became concerned if we could not keep up with supply. We were so lucky to have gained the original lines plans from these classics life sized craft, but I had to make a decision, and following our one year trial, ceased, which I recognise broke many potential customers hearts. I was simply not prepared to do mass production in the sense of same, same. Every customer to us had to have their kits as though the real thing, beyond perfect,a commissioned kit if you like. I know perhaps crazy, but there you go, it is what we strived for and just took far longer than any other kit manufacturer to produce. We are looking at way of perhaps re-producing the kits that people may enjoy, or even do commissions, but just need to carefully think it all through one final time. Being we have the complete rights to the designs in model form, there is no rush from our part against competition, and of course only we know every real detail imposed on the real Broads craft to relay to every kit. Lots to think about all over again, but it has finally come to light following lots of enquiries of our kits, that we simply wanted to show them in their pride and glory here. Cheers to you all.

Sally forth by bluebird2 Seaman   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 30"/2000g Sally forth Capable of 6mph and a runtime of 30mins Single Propellor (2 Blade S Type 50mm) Direct Drive to a mtronics 700 (2 Blade S Type) Powered by NiMH (7.2v) 10Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through mtronics (5Amps) ESC - Comments: Ply deck and glazed cabin scratch built on glass fibre hull from an anglers bait boat. As a novice I am unsure on amps and running times etc.

My other hobby by boaty Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Good to see other PPLs and former PPLs on the Model Boats website. I took mine at Liverpool Airport known now as JLA (John Lennon Airport) in June 1984 and completed it in January 85. Trained with Liverpool Flying School aka Keenair in Cherokee 140s and a PA 38 Tomahawk. Later I moved into Air Nova which was also a Liverpool club and the actor Lewis Collins was also a member of that Club. At the time I was a member of Merseyside IVC (Inter Varsity Club) thus had plenty of passengers. One of them was Victoria Field, my former psychology lecturer who later became famous as a psychologist and writer. Eventually Air Nova moved to Hawarden Airport near Chester but the Club folded shortly after. I then joined the in house Club based at the field and I ceased flying in November 2016. Best flights were going over Snowdon VFR and down the Dee Valley. I also flew over Colwyn Bay to have a look at the boating lake though I haven't sailed there. I also saw the lakes at Llandudno West Shore and LLanfairfechan. The latter I am considering for sailing my fast electrics. Downside to PPL flying was the crosswind component of the aircraft being 17 knots , At Hawarden there is only one runway the 04/22 and Liverpool the 09/27. I did have to cancel many times due to this. Thankfully sailing model boats is much more enjoyable as we don't have that many snags to deal with and if the motor stops we don't have to do an emergency landing.😎😁😁 Boaty

My other hobby by Hellmut1956 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi. Mi private pilots license also does not include night flying. But interesting is to consider when they define what is included. When having a certain number of instructed night flights you are entitled to fly in the vicinity of an airport. Vicinity of an airport German definition is that you have to be able to see the traffic in the pattern of an airport. When I did my flight from San Jose, CA to Phoenix SkyHarbour, I was able to see the traffic being about 1.5 hours from the airport. The night definition is that the night begins 30 minutes after sunset. So was entitled to do this night approaches as you can see the traffic in the pattern, on a large airport like Sky Harbour, and in the Southwest of the USA from very far. But when doing these landing operations at a large international airport, shortly before touch-down you are flying into a black hole. Due to this on my first landing in Sky Harbour, I made an awful 3-point-landing making the plane jump 2 or 3 times. Fortunately, I was aware of how to react properly when this happens. The second special experience is when you are taxiing on the runway to get to its exit and report "runway vacated" in a small plane like a Cessna Cutlass the lights lose their structure. So I went to search for the yellow line on the left side of the runway until it curved into the exit. But this yellow line and the blue runway lights are hugely distant from each other so I had to focus my efforts to stay to the right of the blue lights but still being able to see the yellow line. Once I crossed the lines that mark that you are leaving the runway I could report back to the tower "runway vacated". My second-night landing was when I did try to fly to an airport next to the "Grand Canyon". As the report of the airport said expect gain or lose 40 knots of speed on final I decided not to land and flew back To Phoenix. What a wonderful experience. The landscape was already impressive on my flight to the Grand Canyon, but it was topped when I flew by night. First I was in contact with one center in charge while being above a certain altitude. Then this center passes you to one in charge below that altitude. Makes you feel like a professional pilot. Finally, this center did pass me to the tower of Sky Harbor. I was approaching from the north. Then, what controllers of large airports like they make you cross the airport midfield what ensures you stay away from the other traffic of the airport. You cannot imagine what a sight it is when you approach a large city like Phoenix by night. After he gave me its clear to land I was remembering my awful night landing earlier. When I did have the feeling that I was about to touch-down I did control the airplane so that all you felt on touch-down was the vibration of the wheels turning. A Geman friend of mine that was on the plane with me was so impressed that he said he would fly again with me at any time. One other fact I want to share is the importance to really dominate the phraseology of radio communication and what Americans call to know the system. On my first approach by night to Phoenix, I did confuse the last VOR with the ILS beacon. So when switching to what I thought to be the last VOR the needle got full to the right and stayed there. So I did a report I was not able to tune in the VOR and so tower did give me instructions for the further approach. When you fly in from the west you fly over a mountain full of antennas and the red lights on top of it. I felt very good being routed by the tower. Those of you familiar with night-flight and how to find the location of the airport know the rule of the black spot within the lights of the city is where the airport is. Well, Sky Harbor has the terminal building between its 2 runways and so Sky Harbor does not look like a black spot. So when the tower asked me if I had field in sight I did respond negative a couple of times until he reported that I was on the 45 for the runway. Then I finally saw the airport. Here is something that is the consequence of good radio training. My instructor always said to report negative until you are really enabled to say affirm. So Tower knows when you are really able to report affirm. Do not be shy, it is your and others life! The second time on that approach was when tower gave me the instruction: 3-60 to the right until further advice! My teacher played the role of the tower and one of the things he said to teach us the right behavior was to stay silent and fly as instructed until tower contacts you again. I do confess I had never done 3-60s neither by night nor during the day! So I put the plane into a standard curve, kept it there, watched my altitude and speed. Being so familiar with this instruction from the tower I felt "at home" and this being relaxed was very useful!

Proboat UL19 by boaty Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Just had a new Proboat UL19 Hydroplane delivered. Has anyone had any experience with one. It says 4 to 6S lipo but it mentions not to run flat out all the time on 6S and advises to reduce power in the turn to save the electrics overheating. Never had this info with my Backjack 29 and new Sonic Wake as both don't overheat when at full throttle. For some reason the UL19 has a larger prop fitted than the two other boats and the Blackjack has an Octura prop which I got from Prestwich Model Boats and goes very well. The motor in the UL19 is the same as the one in the Blackjack. My theory is that as the UL19 is a hydroplane which when set up is heavier at the bow and will need an extra burst of power to get it up on the plane. Boaty😁