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>> Home > Tags > sail sail

sail sail
ages of sail
night sail
pj sails
sail
sail servos
sail winch
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Theo 2 by Sollis Petty Officer   Posted: 8 days ago
This is what she looked like in August I have ordered a new suit of cotton sails but I am also making a pair myself which are nearly finished and then it's time for a sail.I think the original suit in the picture are really too delicate to use The braine gear has been set aside and she now has radio control with seperate winches for the job and main The deck has been removed and she is glass lined as some of the planks were a little fragile She is obviously now a bit heavier than she was but a bit more user friendly I will post some pictures of her on the water

TRIUMPH (CG-52301) by circle43nautical Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
[Score: 8/10] 52"/5700g TRIUMPH (CG-52301) Capable of 12mph and a runtime of 60mins Direct Drive to a 775 JOHNSON-TYPE FAN-COOLED 6-12V (5 Blade) Powered by NiMH (8.4v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through DIMART 320A FAN-COOLED ESC - Comments: ON THE WAYS: BARRACUDA RC BOATS 1:12 USCG 52' TYPE F WOODEN MOTOR LIFEBOAT; NAMED "TRIUMPH" (CG-52301), IN HONOR OF THE RESCUE CRAFT LOST IN JAN 1961 DURING RESCUE ATTEMPT WITH LOSS OF ALL HANDS. THIS KIT IS ONE OF THREE IN EXISTENCE, THE OTHER TWO BEING BUILT BY A GENTLEMAN IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST (ONE FOR PERSONAL, THE OTHER FOR A MUSEUM. SHE IS MAINLY LASER CUT BALTIC BIRCH PLYWOOD; THE FALSE KEEL 19MM THICK, RIBS 5.5MM, DECK AND HULL & CABINS 3MM. THE HULL WILL BE COVERED AND REINFORCED WITH POLYESTER FABRIC AND MINWAX POLYURETHANE. THE DECK WILL BE COVERED BY 1/8" BASSWOOD SCRIBED SHEATHING AND THE FANTAIL SEMICIRCLE ABOVE THE STERN POST WILL BE 1/16". FINISH WITH A LIGHT MAHOGANY DECK COAMING. HANDMADE WOODEN RUDDER ON A 3/8" POST STEERED BY A SAIL WINCH SERVO & CABLE SYSTEM, RABOESCH 75MM 5-BLADE BRASS WHEEL TURNED BY A 4MM S/S SHAFT. MOST DECK FITTINGS AND HOUSINGS ARE HANDMADE WHENEVER POSSIBLE AND WOOD REMAINS NATURAL WHEN DETAIL ALLOWS IT, AS I DON'T ENJOY PAINTING OVER NATURAL GRAIN. I LOVE TO REPURPOSE THE LEFTOVER LUMBER FROM KIT TEMPLATES, LORD KNOWS I HAVE PLENTY OF IT. OH WELL, THE TEMP OUTSIDE IS GONNA DELAY ANY PAINTING, ANYWAY.THIS ONE'S TOO BIG FOR THE TUB, SO COME NEXT NAVIGATION SEASON, I'LL BE INVESTING IN A 12X4 FT. INFLATABLE POOL. LET'S GO RC BOATING! YES, MR. ARNOLD PALMER WAS A US COAST GUARDSMAN (YM3) 1950-53

nearly there by Northumbrian Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
I am just waiting for the sails from Mastman then i can complete the build I have changed the drum winch for a standard servo i extended the arm it gives more pull on the sails seems to work better time will tell like all my buddies i am thinking about my winter build i am torn between a hovercraft or a smaller barge i will probably end up doing both 😉

Schooner by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 9/10] 60"/7600g Schooner - Comments: Scratch built with mahogany planks on the club's mould. Glass cloth and fibreglass inside and protected with G4 polyurethane resin all over. Uses a sail winch (Hitec) and travelling dolly for the two main sails and a separate arm servo for the foresails. Standard servo for the rudder. Power is from a 6.6v 1000mA LiFe battery. Taranis Tx using two sticks with the sail servos connected via an internal mixer to one stick. Ballast is fixed to the keel with two studs which extend into the hull where a steel bar is attached between both and acts as a carrying handle.

FRESH BATTERY RUNNING TIME by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Les I see from an earlier post you were considering a Dragon Flight 95 yacht. This looks like the larger version of the RG65 yacht I have. Regarding the battery I suggest you remove after every sail and open up the hull covering to allow any moisture to evaporate. Leaving the battery connected with or without a switch when there is moisture present will over time result in catalytic action on the black wire from the battery to the rx connection. The whole wire will turn black and need replacing Far better to store your battery in an inside environment where there is no condensation. Lixx I store in a metal box in case of any problem. As Doug says the capacity of the battery and the equipment it is supplying determine how long the battery lasts. When you set up the yacht do make sure your winch and rudder servo are not driving up to the end stops as servos can and do draw large currents if stalled. My RG 65 sails happily for 2-3 hours on a fully charges LiFe 6v battery, but I had to add a 5v UBEC to protect the minature rudder servo. Hope this helps Dave

FRESH BATTERY RUNNING TIME by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Les, Sorry🤔 but this is another "How long is a piece of string?" question. It's a simple equation to work out the theoretical endurance, but no input = no output! Inputs required are- Battery type and nominal capacity; mAh as printed on the battery pack, Current drawn by all the electrics connected to it: RX, servos, sail winches etc, auxiliary motor if fitted. I'll leave that bit to the sailing buffs here. I have zilch yachting experience. Re: depletion: Battery should not be left connected when not in use! You should have an ON/OFF switch in the boat to disconnect it. If not in use for longer periods it should be removed from the boat and periodically charged, only to 50% capacity for a LiPo when stored. stored NiCads and NiMh should be periodically cycled; that means discharging to the safe minimum and then recharging SLOWLY. Good chargers have automatic programs for this. Depletion, even when not connected to anything, depends on the battery type. A NiCad looses approx. 1% per month, NiMh and LiPos considerably less but still some depending on the internal resistance of the pack. Better quality (higher price) should mean lower internal resistance and less/slower natural depletion. Avoid cheapo 'no names'. A pic of the battery would be more use than one of the RX😉 Cheers Doug 😎

Experimemtal by tysonyoung Petty Officer   Posted: 5 months ago
[Score: 5/10] 72" Experimemtal Capable of 11mph and a runtime of 120mins Powered by Lead Acid (12v) 7Amp/h Batteries - Comments: Ebay Purchase. Originally a test tank model. Pumped water ballast no rudder or keel. Now fitted with lead fin ballast plus 2 7ah gel cells. and auxiliary motor. Sailing rig "A" class . 72in long 32 in beam .Hull strip wood deck fibre board. Sail winch and heavy duty rudder servo fitted. Design guess work !! Note picture of setting up rudder. 3 years work.

As of Summer 2017... by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 6 months ago
After the sail, I added some hardware to the spars, namely jackstays. I also ordered some aircraft plywood and used it to make new winch drums. These are sized to my current plan of only bracing the tops'l yards. Hopefully, this is the last set I'll have to make. Seeing into the dark interior of the hull can be a pain, more so the brighter it is outside. Mark got some red LEDs to light up the dash of his old pick-up (ute for my Assie friends) and gave me a left-over section. It requires a 12 volt supply (I'm running 6) and red doesn't really help in daylight, but I like the idea. If I can find a white LED strip that'll run on 6 volts, this will definitely get put in. The stern also had folding bulwarks like the bow, but that wrapped all the way around. On the real ship these were replace with a fixed bulwark except for a couple of panels that allowed access to the stern boat. By the time the ship came to Baltimore in 1955, these too were gone, with all their hardware. Again, I'm not making them functional, and decided to built these on the model rather than as separate pieces like on the bow. The hinges are represented inboard by card stock and brass eyes. The barrel portion of the hinges outboard at the bottom of each panel will be a little section of 1/16" wood dowel. The forward bulwarks were epoxied in place and the support rods were installed all around. The tops are raw because they all get a bright cap rail (varnished natural wood) and I'll put that on when it won't get messed up with paint or glue. A friend sent me a box of stuff, among which was a nive little cat face perfect for my catheads. Only having one, I was going to cast a pair in resin. But I'm out of casting resin and epoxy glue didn't set up in a way I liked, so we'll come back to that. The tops'l yards on the ship are hinged iron bands, line with wood staves. I wanted to replicate that functionality not only because that's what the ship has, but because it would allow me to take them off the mast without unrigging half the ship. I cut some heavy copper I use for everything and bent it into two half circles; soldiered brass tubing to the ends, and sawed out the notches with a jewelers saw. If only it had been that easy. Soldiering here tended to un-soldier there, cold soldier joints wouldn't hold. I gave up in frustration. I changed the gun carriages based on some research I did, but I'll post separate entries dealing with them and the ship's boats. I went looking for information on soldiering little things, and took another whack at the parrels. This time it worked out much better. I reused the copper band and brass tubing for the main and made the fore the same way. I still have to make the mizzen tops'l yard parrel, but my soldiering has gotten much much better. Last May ('17) I took the boat to the Baltimore Port Expo for National Maritime Day again, surrounded by members of our newly formed White Rocks Model Boat Club. I didn't manage to get her controls set-up in time, so she didn't go in the pool, but sat on her cart and looked pretty. I put her courses and trys'ls on her for this. The trys'ls won't be used when she sails, but can be set for static displays. The courses will get used, but I'll be able to buntl them up as shown to reduce sail. Also to reduce sail, the t'gallants and royals will be easily removable, or replaceable, as the case may be, depending on what wind there is. That pretty much brings us up to date as of July 2017. I'll post something about the boats and guns in a bit, as well as any other progress that's made. There's far more detail, images, and notes at my website on this, and the other models I'm working on at: http://todd.mainecav.org/model/ There's a few items I skimmed, or skipped over, like her signal flags, that are covered in detail there; like the day she was almost dismasted by the garage door.

Controls by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 6 months ago
Initially, control of the sails, or rather the yards from which the sails hang, was going to be done with sail-winch servos; one for the yards of the foremast, another for the yards of the main and the mizzen mast combined. Each controlled yard would have two drums, one to take up it's braces as the other payed them out. The controlled yards would be the fore course and tops'l yards, the main course and tops'l yards, and the mizzen coss-jack. This meant the main/mizzen had 6 drums and the fore mast winch had 4. The drums diameter corresponded their yards as each brace was of a different length because of the distance from the centerline that the brace was attached to the yard. Since each brace was being controlled by one winch turning at the same speed, the difference had to be made up in the drum diameter. The flanges separating the drums were compact-discs (CDs). The point where the brace attached to the yard describes part of a circle as the yard is turned. The winch drums too, are circles, but the brace from the yard to the point it turns down to the deck, is a vector. Because of this, both braces are tight when the yard is squared, but as it turns to one side, the take-up side stays taught while the paying out side goes slack. Slack on a winch drum is not a good thing, so some means of taking out any slack has to be devised. At this point I was going to mount springs on posts in the hull. They would maintain tension on the braces all the time. The two winches and a sail-arm servo that would control the heads'ls and driver, were all mounted on a tray, or pallet, that would be screwed to the mechanical deck. One winch had to be mounted higher than the other so the drums and braces wouldn't interfere. The real ship's yards were/are attached to the masts and pivoted on iron "patent trusses." I made my facsimile of them from aluminum with brass #2 screws, nuts, and eye-bolts I bent and threaded from brass rod. The clevis between the yard and the mast is 1/4" aluminum rod drilled through and shaped.

Using old motors by Westquay Captain   Posted: 7 months ago
Hi Doug, I have a Supermarine Special, a Double Special, 2 Targets, a Meteor and a Standard. Also a Basset-Lowke, an SEL, a Frog Revmaster, a Frog "red bomb, and a Multum, not to mention Marxes, Mabuchis and Kakos, loads of them! In fact I'll use one of the old but unused blue Mabuchis for my sail winch idea...threaded rod, microswitches for one way and tother, all mounted on a stick of ally. I also have over 50 open framed slot car motors from the golden age of model car racing. So, plenty to choose from! The Supermarine (when I find it again) is out of and will go back into my 53 year old Crash Tender, which I really must finish. I had it new when I was 11. The Double Special is an an Aerokits MTB. Martin

And now it is ESC time by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
My Dad was an electronics specialist in the RAF, one of the first radar guys! Once I figured out how transistors worked and the resistor colour code the rest was relatively easy! I specialised in radio comms, from the early car mobiles and cellphone systems in the 70s - 80s to marine comms the last 30 odd years. Feel free to ask, although I'm not so familiar with sail winch operation. I suppose with all the tackle above deck you can't make it 'fit and forget' before you fit the deck? Good luck Doug

And now it is ESC time by Westquay Captain   Posted: 8 months ago
Doug, my Dad was a radio and TV man. Used to make his own tape recorders and PA gear, but I couldn't ever get my head round it all as it doesn't move. If it goes round or connects in any way I'm there, but any wires and I glaze over like it was football or something (I detest all sport). I don't even know how to wire up the microswitches on my sail winch. I might be on here for some help there from you! Cheers, Martin

And now it is ESC time by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
Saves on motors, batteries and chargers as well, so now you can afford a decent sail winch! Nicht wahr 😉

"Vanity" leaves the building board by Westquay Captain   Posted: 8 months ago
Just made my first dovetail corner joint on one of the decklights. Seemed to work out OK once I'd I'd got the shape of both parts in my head. Used the vice jaws as a guide and a piercing saw to cut the joints. My Aliphatic glue had dried up, so I had to use PVA, so no pics till tomorrow in the daylight, In 1/16th scale the decklight over the main saloon (see above picture) is 4ft. x 2ft-6in....3"x 1.875". Nowhere near big enough to fiddle in my sail winch system so I think she may have to be a rudder only job. No sweat really. I had hours of good sailing with an old plastic 375, rudder only. Unless I can work out an invisible method of lifting a section of decking. AND keeping it waterproof! Martin

"Vanity" leaves the building board by Westquay Captain   Posted: 8 months ago
Hi all, I have this afternoon released my model of the Victorian Class C Cutter, "Vanity", from her building board. First surprise was how light it is! I really can't believe how light. Being a plank-on-edge craft she is very deep draughted and with such a light weight she should be able to carry her ballast internally which is much the preferable way for me. Now the really hard stuff begins. Preparing the inside of the hull to take the strains of the various bits of standing rigging, somewhere to fix my patent dual sail winch and get the deck all levelled and cambered correctly. She had a very complex deck, with teak covering boards joggled round the bulwarks, which were simply extensions of her doubled oak frames, then narrow boards (on the model 3/16th") deck panks which follow the covering boards as all good yachts should, but unusually, Vanity did not have a King plank and so there is no joggling of the inner ends of the planks, but they must, of course, all meet perfectly. The deck furniture was also rather splendid as she had a roundhouse aft, glazed and several companionways and deck lights, plus the usual Samson post and bitts. Her tiller was a huge lump of mahogany about 6 feet long. The level of woodwork throughout was like this:-https://model-boats.com/media/np/s/200/1493829043 That's how she looked when I lived aboard her in Burnham-on-Crouch She was like this when sailing https://model-boats.com/media/np/s/200/1493829032 Cheers, Martin