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>> Home > Tags > sanding

sanding
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sanding sealer
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eezebuild RAF tender by Midlife306 Captain   Posted: 7 days ago
MDF does act like a sponge, but I would expect it to act the same with sanding sealer or fibreglass resin, don't discount it too soon👍 Cheers Wayne

Sophia by Alan999 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 9 days ago
Chris Craft Riva Building a Chris craft Riva from scratch seemed a good idea.. I use three ply scrap wood costing three euros fifty cents so far.But I have in stock rolls of two inch wide veneer which I wrap around the stringers. So far it's three thicknesses thick which I feel is enough. Next stage is a hard sanding then a varnish before the 100 and things to do to it. Any comments appreciated and ideas. Alan

The electrics, drive & radio by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
Hi Doug and AllenA. Yes, it is indeed good old Hammerite 👍 I sealed all the interior surfaces with a couple of coats of sanding sealer and then two coats of the silver Hammerite on the hull bottom, sides and bulkheads and it gives a quite an attractive finish which is very durable. It was recommended by VMW in the build instructions and I'm very pleased with the result 😁

Building a deck by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 30 days ago
I began laying the deck on April 5th. It had snowed as recently as the week before, but it finally warmed up enough to use glue. The strips were cut to 6-5/8" length, about 20' in 1:36 scale. I used a black marker on two opposite sides to represent the pitch in the seams. The deck was laid in a 5-plank pattern to mix up the butt-joints as much as I could. My research on her decking found she's had various styles and plank widths over her life. The earliest photo showing her deck that I could find, showed it straight planked with 7 or 8" wide boards based on the number of planks between her waterway and the main hatch coaming. Her waterway logs seem to be placed ON the decking, as there's no margin planks or joggling - even today. The planking was set with gel CA. Gorilla sells it in a nice bottle with a metal pin in the cap to keep the spout open. It would up taking 3 of these bottles to complete the deck. The planks are cut at a 45 on the ends along the fore and aft access hatches, to try and hide this seam as much as possible. Once the deck was down, I scraped it. The glue is more resistant than the basswood is, so sanding would have scalloped the wood between seams. Scraping makes everything level. Some lite sanding, more to polish than remove anything, was done last. I had planned to stain the deck a very light grayish tint, but an active naval vessel gets holy-stoned regularly and wouldn't be gray as the ships that sit at a dock today are. In all it took 455 pieces to complete the deck and there wasn't any scrap longer than 1 inch left over. In all I have 3/4" deck beams, 1/4" plywood, a layer of 4oz cloth and resin, and a 3/16" basswood deck - I don't recall why I designed it so heavy, but it certainly doesn't hurt the model at all, and I think the 3/16" square strip will prove to have been easier to set than the 1/16" x 1/4" planks Pride and Macedonian will get. The deck go a coat of water-based satin poly, and I stared working on hatch coamings, cap log, and waterways. The cabin skylight and two hatched forward of it, including the capstan, and all combined into one hatch where the battery is accessed, and which hides the aft ballast rod and main power switch. The cap logs Are 1/2" wide x 1/4" tall basswood that was tren'led, glued, and copper nailed, onto the deck, flush with the outside of the hull covering this seam completely. The the angled wood waterways were installed around the inside of the cap log, and the deck got a coat of oil-based satin poly. This actually leeched in and made the marker seams bleed a little. In hind sight, I think I'll go with paint over marker for seams in the future. The coamings got painted black. I'm not sure why the Navy painted deck fittings black. It was even common to paint to top surfaces of tops black. I wonder how many injuries and losses this cost the navy that white paint would have prevented. Anyway... Constellation didn't have "solid" bulwarks, but rather she had hammock irons bolted to her cap log. These were removed when Baltimore tried to pass her off as a frigate and tossed in the bilge. When the ship was restored as a sloop of war, they found all but one. These irons are designed to have wooden rails at their tops, inboard and out, and have holes so several lines can be run through them. The Navy in it's wisdom though, decided to wainscot them to appear as solid bulwarks, despite the additional splinter hazard that would be in battle. I wasn't making all those metal stanchions just to hide them under wood and tarps, so I made wood blocks sheathed in sheet bass, scribed to look like vertical wainscotting. It was the end of April by now, and the Baltimore Port Expo was in two weeks. I wanted to have hammocks in the bulwarks, as she appears in the portrait, but there was no time to figure this out, so I layered on some balsa and shaped it so it looked like tarps were laid over the hammocks. When I figure out how I'll represent the stowed hammocks, I can pull the balsa off easily enough. The bulwarks on, I made some fittings for the spencer masts; installed the eye bolts at the base of the masts; made some bollards (or whatever name they gave those posts), made and installed the catheads, which are laminated 1/16" basswood. I then started setting up a jury rig and her controls so she could sail at the Port Expo. I set her t'gallants and all three heads'ls this time around. By the night before the Expo, she was ready to go.

Progress Mark 2 by Pav403 Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Hello all, So I've managed to get back to somewhere near where I was last time. The frame work is of a slightly thicker Ply (1/4") The Keel is straight, frames are all 100% level and I've now used balsa block for the Bow and Stern to give the planking a bit more support and to assist in getting a better shape at both ends. Fingers crossed I will have the hull build in the next few weeks, I can then get on with Sanding and filling before applying fiberglass and Resin to make the hull solid. Uploaded a few photos to show where I'm at. Good luck with your builds. Dave.

Dumas Chris Craft finishing by don6398 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 1 month ago
I completed the Dumas 36" CHRISCraft several years ago. I made sure all of wood planking was completely smooth and minus all dents. I covered the model in 5 oz. fiberglass cloth and cover it with resin/Hardener. The planking immediately shine out. I then did a light sanding and gave it one more coat of resin/hardener. When dried I put some auto wax on it. You can purchase this material in marine stores or a good hardware store. My father and i did this a long time ago a real 22 foot ChrisCraft barrel . We did a small corner of the boat first, you can do the same on the model. We did fiberglass the whole boat so that we didn't have to soak the boat at beginning of the summer

Dumas Chris Craft finishing by captaindoug1 Apprentice   Posted: 1 month ago
Any good Spar varnish will work just give it about 7 coats with sanding in between coats with fine paper

Top and hull come together by Rod Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Thanks Wayne I'm enjoying making this one up from scratch more satisfying I must say but fairly challenging and slower than kitsets that's for real !! Heaps of sanding ahead of me but worth it to get a good paint finish (I hope )

Top and hull come together by Rod Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Just fibteglassed the top and hull together and tried the rubber bumper strip out for scale Looks like it will do the trick Now onto a heap of sanding sanding and more sanding to get it perfect for painting Still not sure what colour I will use but I guess something that stands out amongst the river rapids

Jet Sprint Boat by Rod Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
Just taken top half out of the mould So far so good Now to complete sanding and join the hull to the top and then commence painting

The window glazing & frames. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
A full set of laser cut perspex windows is supplied in the VMW kit along with corresponding frames for all and they are all a pretty good fit in the window apertures of the engine room, forward cabin and wheel house rear walls, only requiring a light easing with a file for a secure fit. I left the protective film on the screens whilst gluing them in place with a very small amount of canopy glue applied to the window edges with a dressmaking pin and pressed into place so that they were flush with the outside of the cabin walls. The wheelhouse windows were a bit trickier as they are glued to the inside face of the panels and I had to remove the protective film around the edges of the outer face of the windows by running a fine sharp blade around the window aperture with the perspex held in place by hand. Canopy glue was then used very sparingly on the face of the perspex and the windows clamped in place. The central screen of the wheelhouse has the Kent Clearview in it and this needed to be carefully centred before fixing in place. When all had dried and set the protective films were peeled off to reveal nice clear ‘panes’ without any unsightly glue smudges. The CNC cut window frames are made from a flexible plastic material with accurate and well defined edges. They were all given a light sanding with abrasive paper as a key for the paint and were then laid out on a large piece of card paying particular attention to getting them the correct side up, in particular the wheelhouse frames which are ‘handed’ for either port or starboard. They were all held to the board with small pads of double sided foam tape and sprayed with two coats of Halfords metallic silver paint followed by two light coats of Halfords gloss lacquer. After a couple of days to dry they were removed from the board and fixed in place with canopy glue applied with a pin as very small dots around the inside face, aligned with masking tape ‘guides’ and a straight edge and then held in place with small tabs of masking tape. The installation of the glazing in the wheelhouse was made a lot easier because I had previously cut away some of the bulkhead and rear wall to give better access to the wheelhouse interior for detailing. This is not mentioned in the building instructions but is well worth doing for all the above reasons 😁

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by John Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Thanks for all the advice. I am on with the sanding which will take some time.

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by Inkoust Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hello, I recommend grinding the whole body with fine sanding paper, then take the "LORD NELSON" pore filler and then re-grind it again. Subsequently, the final lacquer of the best brand. I have been treated like a wooden boat DIVA and already for 6 years on the water without any problems. What happened to you is that you used a bad lacquer that does not resist water. Two-component epoxy lacquers are also good for large yachts. I'm sending a link to the Czech site where the varnishes are designed for ship modellers. Just use the Gogle translator and the same merchandise you can get at the shop. Or on EBay. https://www.modelylodi.cz/Laky-a-plnice-c11_86_2.htm😉

Paint removal by onetenor Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
If the deck is also GRP the best bet is to plank it with fine veneer strips then varnish that. If it needs filler between the planks use a black one. Carbon black or similar added to the filler .Brown would also look smart.Artists powder paint could also be used and be cleaner to handle.Lite filler from B&Q is very good .Light and easy sanding and I believe slightly flexible so should not crack out.

Steering wheel by Midlife306 Captain   Posted: 2 months ago
This was quite easy to be fair, I just pushed the Milliput into the gap in the blue foam & left it a couple of days to go properly off. I then pulled it from the blue foam, sanded it flat as possible & chamfered all 4 corners with a file, then it was just a case of sanding the profile round. For added realism I used a small sanding drum in the Dremil to add the indentations on the back edge. I drew out the centre & spokes on some plastic card & cut the shape out on the hot wire cutter, a quick going over with a file & then I noticed on the picture that there was a slight dish on the wheel, to replicate it I pencil marked where the bends needed to be & offered the back of the spokes upto but not touching the hot wire cutter, this put the heat in the right position to allow me to bend it. I then superglued it all together. Took me a couple of hours start to finish. I've a bit more detail to add before I paint it, I'm going to have a go at distressing the paint so you can see silver under the black as in the pic. I think Milliput is awesome stuff, it's the next step down from a 3D printer I guess. Cheers Wayne