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>> Home > Tags > scale model

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Task Force 72 Fleet Base Victoria by reilly4 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
Victorian Fleet Base - 1/72 scale model ships. Part of Task Force 72

Broads Light Class Cabin Cruisers by NorfolkBroads Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 11 days ago
Thought I would share some photos of my lovely 1:16 scale model cabin cruisers, of the famous 1920/30s Herbert Wood's Light Class Blakes Holiday Cabin Cruisers. And their scale Broads dinghy, Titmouse. All their external detail is exact to the real craft of their heyday. I simply love constructing these old craft from a real bygone era. Presently underway are more cruisers I am working on, Cirrus and Western Light.

Ship rudders by Toby Lieutenant   Posted: 16 days ago
I have been making a rudder for a large scale model of S S Hunan and having progressed, after a few set backs, wondered how other modellers built their rudders especially those with multiple hinges. Toby

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 21 days ago
Rowen, here are a couple of things that may be of use to you (and others). The battery alarm will save you worrying about running out of steam as they can be set to beep at varying voltages to warn you of low battery, just put one on each batt balance lead and when one goes off (when an individual cell drops below the set voltage) it means start heading back. These can be picked up on Ebay for a few dollars. I use them on my planes as well and are audable from around 100m (these twin horns are the best) Secondly, re your ESC switches, these electronic switches (AliExpress) are great for this sort of thing (as long as you have enough aux switches on TX ) You can link them with a Y cable to work together or use them independantly for anything, (lights, pumps etc, - they can be operated by TX rotary switches as well) The ESC and 2000kv motor (HK) are the ones I am using in my ASR model and will work smoothly down to a crawl, the purple 1980 kv seems to have superseded these but I think they will be as good. The props are from Ali Express and are resin and available in L and R hand, are only a few bucks and perform perfectly while looking quite scale(ish). I painted them with an acrylic bronze which seems to have stayed on pretty well. Model weighs 2.8kg and will run at more than 10mph flat out with this set-up (using the 26mm L+R) props) which is silly speed and that's with 2x 2s 2200mah lipos (which will last till you get sick of it and still have 60% left) I was just looking at your Daman set-up and noticed the wiring method from the batts to the ESCs. You might want to make your batt to ESC connections direct to your ESCs (as per original ESC lead length)as your capacitors may get a thrashing (spikes) due to the extra length/ resistance you have there. There is a general rule that you don't lengthen the batt to ESC wiring without adding a 220mf capacitor of same voltage as the ESC for every 4"of extra wire length (ESC to motor - not so much). Might want to check this out in case you fry your ESCs You probably have thought of this but thought I'd mention it, 'just in case' Might help with your modulation as well. Have chucked in a vid of the HSL manouvering (first trials so wasn't perfect) and also the MTB (brushed) which I have just converted to a twin system (was twin but single Electronize unit) plus a sound unit. You may know that you can use as many RECs (bound to the same TX) for various purposes on the same boat (have run 2 boats together from the same TX) Might get you round the mixed brushless/ brushed problem with a bit of thought. Have you thought of changing your old HK silver 6DF TX to twin throttles, it's a piece of cake(as is the TGY 6x), just remove the aileron/rudder centering spring and make a friction plate as per throttle stick, and use the elevator channel as your other throttle. Set your ESCs and you can then use a twin system giving you perfect control. Saves a lot of hassle.

HMS M.33 by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi John, When I retired I one of my savings funds matured and I used it to renew the 'chariot' (Toyota Verso Exec) and used some of the 'leftovers' to treat myself to the Manxman and also a kit for an Akula 2 Russian sub; complete with all necessary static diving and safety equipment. 😊 Next expenditure on that scale for model ships will be in the next life. If I'm reborn as a cat or a warthog I'll have a problem 😲 BTW you can also get a hull only from Deans. £91.40. http://deansmarine.co.uk/shop/product_info.php/cPath/26_33/p... And I have a complete set of plans in pdf format if you're interested. Think you're right about the anecdote, the version seems to depend on where the sailor recounting it was serving or had served 😉 Anyway; the Abdiel class ships were well capable of doing that. The USN Carrier Groups run out of 'puff' at about 32-34 knots (Nimitz class) whereas Manxman still had 6 to 8 knots in hand 😁 All the best, Doug 😎 BTW; What were you up to 'somewhere in the China Sea'? Ten years or so ago I spent about an hour n a half circling above the Yellow / East China Sea after take off from Seoul, S. Korea. I had just spent an interesting week at the Daewoo shipyard. Plane had some problem with the undercarriage, wouldn't retract according to the cockpit display!😲 so we circled dumping fuel before landing back at Seoul. Nobody was sure if it would fold up on landing or not, it didn't, big PHEW! 😊

Our Ben Fishing Boat by GrahamP74 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
I have purchased a fishing boat as part of a boat bundle on ebay, It looks like a Cygnus DS25 hull. I intend to remove the deck that has been fitted very high, change the wheelhouse and make it into a small netting boat on a 16th scale. The name is for my Nephew who has enjoyed watching me make my other models and loves coming to the lake with me. This way he can have a boat of his own!

36" Thames River Police Launch by Robbob by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
After the successful build of the ‘Vintage Model Works’ RAF Crash Rescue Tender I was asked by Mike Cummings of VMW if I would undertake to build a prototype of their new model with the aim of checking the construction method and the assembly instructions for accuracy before the kit is put into production. The model is a ‘Thames River Police Launch’ and is based on the original design by Phil Smith for the Veron company, this was a very popular model kit in the late 50’s and 60’s and sold for the princely sum of 43 shillings and tuppence, approximately £2.15 in today’s money but an equivalent cost of £48.50 in 1960. This design has been updated to accommodate electric propulsion and radio control by Colin Smith, the son of the original designer and it has been re-scaled to be 36” in length where the original was 24” which gives much more scope for detailing and provides more ‘hiding room’ for the drive, control systems and all the associated wiring. The kit produced by VMW uses the same construction techniques as the original and the materials are a combination of balsa and plywood both of which a laser and CNC cut for precision. The ply and balsa materials supplied are of very high quality as one would expect from VMW and all the stripwood for the chines, rubbing strakes and deck detailing is included, even the dowel required for the mast is in the box, very comprehensive! The kit also includes white metal fittings such as the fairleads and stanchions, and the searchlight and horns. The glazing for the windows comes in the kit too. The instruction sheet supplied is in need of revision as it is largely taken directly from the original as written by Phil Smith and some of the terminology needs updating, for instance the ply bottom and side skins are referred to as ‘strakes’ but I understand that a re-write of the instructions is in hand along with an updated plan showing the best positioning for the motor, prop-shaft, battery, ESC, receiver, rudder and servo. During construction I have added a few additional pieces of ply or balsa as reinforcement or supports and substituted some balsa parts for ply where I thought a stronger material would be better. I also added some hatches to give access to the wiring at the bow and the rudder & servo at the stern but largely I have not gone ‘off plan’ to any extent. The pictures show the model in it’s present state (Nov 2018) and is ready for painting and finishing.

just need cable (wire)... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Gents, I wanted the soft floppy silicon covered wires, so Halfords wouldn't do. Doug, the odd thing is that when I worked in Germany as a clay modeller, I was often given hard modelling jobs (not clay) which usually meant making complex little mechanisms. So much so that I became known as Mechanical Martin or just "Mekanist". Yet back home fitting all the worky bits to a model boat or even a slot car/model railway loco is the bit I hate! Don't know why, except maybe in the boats/slotcars/locos there is a certain way of doing it which I find a drudge and in the clay studios there was always an element of invention required. Indeed I am the nominated inventor on a VW patent! But, I have run out of space for storage boxes and can only rarely get to a decent pond to run anything, so I am going over to static models only now. 1/24th scale models of mahogany hot rods (woodies), some in scenic set-pieces, maybe. But I'll finish the models I have on the go first. Martin

Numbers and lettering for solent by KenThompson Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Check out BECC on line, they have most of the scale numbers/letters for your model. Prices aren’t bad either.

"Exuberent" DH142 by Ballast Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
South Devon Crabber :- Cygnus GM 32' 1/12 Scale. Donor hull 32" fitted out/scratch built. Replica of actual vessel that floundered off Weymouth in 1983. Model build started in 1981 and completed in 2018 !!!

Rudders and Propellers by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
BTW; I copied your above massive text block into a document file and split it up into paragraphs so I could see where you're at! My conclusion: so far so good BUT! You made the one classic mistake of many model boat / ship builders 🤔 You continued the prop shaft tube right back to the propeller and hence you had to make oversize struts to support them. This is fundamental wrong and creates unnecessary work.😉 On real ships, including the Schnellboote, the so called 'stuffing tube' is JUST THAT, it 'stuffs' the shaft through the hull and includes stuffing glands to prevent the ingress of sea water. Outside the hull ONLY the rotating shaft itself continues on through the bearing in the support strut and to the prop. See attached pics of my HMS Belfast as an example. There was actually no reason for you to make oversize strut bearings, simply bushes to match your prop SHAFT not the tube would have been correct. Inside the real ship there is also NO TUBE, only bearings at suitable intervals. They look like gigantic versions of the big ends in your car. Imagine on really big ships, carriers, container ships, bulk tankers etc, with shaft diameters of 1metre or so how big the 'tube' would be, how much weight that would add and how difficult it would be to service and maintain! I've often noticed in posts here that folk confuse shaft and tube, often referring to the whole assembly as 'the shaft'. For convenience we modellers use prop tubes, who wants to fiddle about making a row of internal shaft bearings no one will ever see and will most likely never be really concentric? The downside is that continuing this 'convenience' outside the hull is wrong, adds weight and detracts from the scale appearance of the model. 😭 OK, it's 3am here now so - orf me 'obby 'orse and up (in my case down!) the wooden stairs to Bedfordshire, G'night all, cheers, Doug😎 Re shaft length: What fits fits, what don't don't! Such a question is like asking 'How long is a piece of string?'! If all three motors abreast won't fit you have to decide if the central motor should / will fit fore or aft of the outer motors. Then measure / adjust the shaft length accordingly. Before you start fitting the centre motor check what length shafts are commercially available and adjust your motor fit to suit. Otherwise make your own shafts and tubes to fit as required, as I've started doing cos I got fed up with 'standard sizes' wot don' wanna fit my ship. 🤔 G'night All, cheers, Doug 😎

USGC Island class fg hull. by epmbcmember Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
I wish to build a USCG Island class cutter. I have a full set of plans but I am not too brilliant at making hulls from scratch. I have found a possible source, MTBHulls of Gibralta, of getting a fibre glass hull at 1/48 scale but they need an order of 4 to produce one. They produce many different hulls but not this one, hence the requirement for 4 to make it viable to make a new hull. So I am looking for 3 other model makers who may be interested in buying one of these hulls at approx. £55 each plus any cost for me to post them on or deliver. The Island class cutter is 110 feet long, which would make a model just over 2 foot long, and based on a Vosper Thornycroft design but built in the States. I believe there were about 80 built of which 35 remain in service. There are many pictures of them on the internet which is where I got the plans from but I am happy to copy the plans if anyone is interested.

Paints by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hmm! Let's 'Cut to the chase'! First; I've never been on a ship, naval or civil, and I've been on a few during my 30 odd year career designing COMMS systems for ships, mostly naval, that used gloss paints OR matt paints. Matt paint, whether for scale or full size, rapidly shows the wear marks where folks tread or grab or where we habitually grab it on models. This rapidly creates a shiny effect, like the seat of your favourite, most comfortable and ancient trousers (which the Missus probably wanted to throw out years ago but you are fighting a REARguard action) 😁 During WW2 the emphasis was on reducing the reflectivity of paints on warships. Gloss on a ship / boat MAY not look any different from satin or matt at a distance BUT; it will reflect sunlight and flash which attracts attention and betrays the presence of the vessel. Furthermore gloss shows the wear and tear marks much sooner than satin. Whether matt paints were available or not in those days I don't know, but even if they were I don't think they would have been used after the initial durability tests on board. Having seen the paint part numbers, all BS381C xxx, specified on the Thornycroft 'blueprints' that Martin sent me, I would say that the paint colours you need Morkullen are RN Light Weatherworks grey BS381C 676 = Colour Coats M01 RN Dark Admiralty grey BS381C 632 = Colour Coats M16 RN Light Admiralty grey BS381C 697= Colour Coats M23 See page 3 of the colour chart, see attached colour charts from Sovereign Hobbies for their Colour Coats paints, which have been derived from original Admiralty paint chips.. Colour Coats are enamel. If you prefer acrylic try Life Colour set CS33 Royal Navy WW2 Set 1. See page 6 of attached Life Colour catalogue. Happy painting, don't forget to post pics / vids of the results👍 Cheers, Doug 😎 PS have a look at the recent HMS Campbeltown 1/96 thread for further detail of the recent discussion on WW2 RN paints. BTW; if I feel after painting that the finish is still too glossy I give it a blast of Lord Nelson satin, or in extreme cases, matt clear varnish. Otherwise I agree with Reilly's comments👍

Where's our mate?... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Agreed John👍 especially in the Pacific colours faded rapidly. Depends if you want 'as built' / 'freshly painted' or 'in action'. "Not many people would spot or even know the difference anyway." Trouble is 'We do!' 😁 Cheers, Doug 😎 BTW the mix proportions, of those colours not yard premixed, are given in one of the links I gave. For scale models it seems to be generally accepted to lighten the basic colours a little, have seen 10 to 20% white depending on darkness of the base colour, to give more impression of distance and hence more realism on the wet stuff.

Empress of Canada 1961 by Trillium Captain   Posted: 2 months ago
I am interested in getting in touch with anyone who has built a sailing model of "Empress of Britain" or "Empress of England" to Vic Smeed's plan. I'd like to know if they built to scale draft, and if the model was stable and sat at waterline depth. Roy