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>> Home > Tags > scale model

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Rudders and Propellers by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 hours ago
BTW; I copied your above massive text block into a document file and split it up into paragraphs so I could see where you're at! My conclusion: so far so good BUT! You made the one classic mistake of many model boat / ship builders 🤔 You continued the prop shaft tube right back to the propeller and hence you had to make oversize struts to support them. This is fundamental wrong and creates unnecessary work.😉 On real ships, including the Schnellboote, the so called 'stuffing tube' is JUST THAT, it 'stuffs' the shaft through the hull and includes stuffing glands to prevent the ingress of sea water. Outside the hull ONLY the rotating shaft itself continues on through the bearing in the support strut and to the prop. See attached pics of my HMS Belfast as an example. There was actually no reason for you to make oversize strut bearings, simply bushes to match your prop SHAFT not the tube would have been correct. Inside the real ship there is also NO TUBE, only bearings at suitable intervals. They look like gigantic versions of the big ends in your car. Imagine on really big ships, carriers, container ships, bulk tankers etc, with shaft diameters of 1metre or so how big the 'tube' would be, how much weight that would add and how difficult it would be to service and maintain! I've often noticed in posts here that folk confuse shaft and tube, often referring to the whole assembly as 'the shaft'. For convenience we modellers use prop tubes, who wants to fiddle about making a row of internal shaft bearings no one will ever see and will most likely never be really concentric? The downside is that continuing this 'convenience' outside the hull is wrong, adds weight and detracts from the scale appearance of the model. 😭 OK, it's 3am here now so - orf me 'obby 'orse and up (in my case down!) the wooden stairs to Bedfordshire, G'night all, cheers, Doug😎 Re shaft length: What fits fits, what don't don't! Such a question is like asking 'How long is a piece of string?'! If all three motors abreast won't fit you have to decide if the central motor should / will fit fore or aft of the outer motors. Then measure / adjust the shaft length accordingly. Before you start fitting the centre motor check what length shafts are commercially available and adjust your motor fit to suit. Otherwise make your own shafts and tubes to fit as required, as I've started doing cos I got fed up with 'standard sizes' wot don' wanna fit my ship. 🤔 G'night All, cheers, Doug 😎

USGC Island class fg hull. by epmbcmember Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 9 days ago
I wish to build a USCG Island class cutter. I have a full set of plans but I am not too brilliant at making hulls from scratch. I have found a possible source, MTBHulls of Gibralta, of getting a fibre glass hull at 1/48 scale but they need an order of 4 to produce one. They produce many different hulls but not this one, hence the requirement for 4 to make it viable to make a new hull. So I am looking for 3 other model makers who may be interested in buying one of these hulls at approx. £55 each plus any cost for me to post them on or deliver. The Island class cutter is 110 feet long, which would make a model just over 2 foot long, and based on a Vosper Thornycroft design but built in the States. I believe there were about 80 built of which 35 remain in service. There are many pictures of them on the internet which is where I got the plans from but I am happy to copy the plans if anyone is interested.

Paints by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
Hmm! Let's 'Cut to the chase'! First; I've never been on a ship, naval or civil, and I've been on a few during my 30 odd year career designing COMMS systems for ships, mostly naval, that used gloss paints OR matt paints. Matt paint, whether for scale or full size, rapidly shows the wear marks where folks tread or grab or where we habitually grab it on models. This rapidly creates a shiny effect, like the seat of your favourite, most comfortable and ancient trousers (which the Missus probably wanted to throw out years ago but you are fighting a REARguard action) 😁 During WW2 the emphasis was on reducing the reflectivity of paints on warships. Gloss on a ship / boat MAY not look any different from satin or matt at a distance BUT; it will reflect sunlight and flash which attracts attention and betrays the presence of the vessel. Furthermore gloss shows the wear and tear marks much sooner than satin. Whether matt paints were available or not in those days I don't know, but even if they were I don't think they would have been used after the initial durability tests on board. Having seen the paint part numbers, all BS381C xxx, specified on the Thornycroft 'blueprints' that Martin sent me, I would say that the paint colours you need Morkullen are RN Light Weatherworks grey BS381C 676 = Colour Coats M01 RN Dark Admiralty grey BS381C 632 = Colour Coats M16 RN Light Admiralty grey BS381C 697= Colour Coats M23 See page 3 of the colour chart, see attached colour charts from Sovereign Hobbies for their Colour Coats paints, which have been derived from original Admiralty paint chips.. Colour Coats are enamel. If you prefer acrylic try Life Colour set CS33 Royal Navy WW2 Set 1. See page 6 of attached Life Colour catalogue. Happy painting, don't forget to post pics / vids of the results👍 Cheers, Doug 😎 PS have a look at the recent HMS Campbeltown 1/96 thread for further detail of the recent discussion on WW2 RN paints. BTW; if I feel after painting that the finish is still too glossy I give it a blast of Lord Nelson satin, or in extreme cases, matt clear varnish. Otherwise I agree with Reilly's comments👍

Where's our mate?... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
Agreed John👍 especially in the Pacific colours faded rapidly. Depends if you want 'as built' / 'freshly painted' or 'in action'. "Not many people would spot or even know the difference anyway." Trouble is 'We do!' 😁 Cheers, Doug 😎 BTW the mix proportions, of those colours not yard premixed, are given in one of the links I gave. For scale models it seems to be generally accepted to lighten the basic colours a little, have seen 10 to 20% white depending on darkness of the base colour, to give more impression of distance and hence more realism on the wet stuff.

Empress of Canada 1961 by Trillium Captain   Posted: 15 days ago
I am interested in getting in touch with anyone who has built a sailing model of "Empress of Britain" or "Empress of England" to Vic Smeed's plan. I'd like to know if they built to scale draft, and if the model was stable and sat at waterline depth. Roy

1/24 crew figures by philpjuk Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 16 days ago
Thanks for the offer! but have now stopped the building after fitting windows,yes it was thatched but now tiled,over 500 years old with chimneys fitted later and floors inserted.My wife and I joined a buildings archeology group and measured and drew the house in 1/25 scale and it seemed a good idea to build a model,(we found the priest hole by doing this)pics of a wattle and daub wall in the roof real and model.Sorry for the thread drift now back to boats!

Wave Princess by jimdogge Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 17 days ago
Hi snowballs, dont know if this helps I have the original plan from a norstar wave princess but its not to scale it seems to be 2 thirds of the size to the finished model you are welcome to a copy if you want it. Jim dogge.

1/24 crew figures by philpjuk Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 19 days ago
I built a scale model of my house in 25/1 and found dolls house bits at 24/1 very useful.

Darby One Design hydro... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 23 days ago
Dowty Turbocraft was smiled upon by Donald Campbell as a service vessel after he'd used Albatrosses. It's thought it was a bit of wash from the Dowty that caused his final crash. i I used to have a Mk 1 Albatross, Hull 137, but nI couldn't use it anywhere fast due to river speed limits, so I flogged it. It was all riveted aluminium, made by ex Spitfire makers. The countersunk rivets, after over 50 years were so well applied you just couldn't see them. Amazing craftsmanship, but when they were first on sale, they were the price of a small house! I paid rather less, rebuilt the engine, repainted it and flogged it for a lot more, then made a 1/6th scale model of it and sold that to a man who owns most of the boathouses round Windermere. A Ford 1172 sidevalve engined boat would tow 2 water skiers amazingly. There's a website called Old Speed Boats that deals with Dowty Turbocraft well. Cheers, Martin

Calculating scale speed by boaty Admiral   Posted: 24 days ago
HOW TO CALCULATE SCALE SPEED Such is the diversity in model boating with anything from a tug to fast service launches and hydroplanes there is always the issue of what is scale speed as we want our models to look right when on the water. This can be achieved by finding the square root of the scale multiplied by the speed of the full size craft. All you need is a pocket calculator and as an example I will use an M.T.B that is flat out at 40 knots. The boat is a 1/35 scale model. We start by dividing 1 by 35 which is .0285714 then press square root that shows up as .1690307 which when multiplied by 40 (speed of full size craft in knots) gives us 6.76 knots for the model. When calculating it in miles per hour the process is still the same. Boaty😁

BRAVE BORDERER - BRUSHLESS SUMMARY by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Although have modeling experience, all my earlier vessels used brushed motors. This was my first brushless. The model is now running well, but thought, for the benefit of others considering this transition to summarize my experiences. Must stress the performance of a brushless motor is incredible when compared to a similar sized brushed; for a vessel such as this they are almost obligatory. They are worth the trouble! Had been advised that the best powertrain installation for a 37” Brave Borderer is either a single or twin screws, not three. This was good advice! Much heartache could have been avoided with a single screw installation. Unfortunately, that is not the correct layout for a scale builder. Tried three major powertrain iterations, with several variations within each group. All motors are 28mm O/D : 1) The original installation used 3 x 4600kV inrunner motors with 30 A ESCs. Had bought these items used. The motors were too fast and had little torque. The ESCs also did not have adequate capacity. The result was erratic performance, a high fuse failure rate and the eventual failure of an ESC and motor Picture #1. 2) First upgrade was to 2 x 2400kV inrunner motors, using 50A capacity ESCs. The centre shaft was fitted with a brushed motor. This combination did work, although suffered greatly from motor “squeal” and “stutter”. Eventually a motor burnt out and failed. Picture #2 3) Upgrade two: retained the 50 A ESCs, with 2 x 2600 kV outrunner motors, again with the brushed inner shaft motor. Reprogrammed the ESCs to soft start parameters. Much better, performance and reliability can now be considered acceptable. The squeal and stutter are largely corrected It has justified the challenges of getting here. Picture #3 Have tried both 2 and 3S Li-Po batteries, suggest use the minimum voltage needed to achieve the desired performance. Higher voltages translate into faster response and performance, but with less control modulation. The model can be easily overpowered. In summary, from my experience. For a marine application; chose low (under 2000kV) kV rating motors with an outrunner layout wherever possible (produce more torque than inrunners). Use ESCs with a ratings comfortably in excess of the motor ratings, fit fuses to supplement any ESC protections. Ensure the ESCs are programmed to “soft start” characteristics. Also, the obvious check of making sure shaft alignment is correct is even more important with the higher speed capability of brushless motors. In spite of the trails, cost and tribulations of getting here. Have enjoyed the challenge and the end result does justify the means. Also, do not finally fit the deck until you are satisfied with the performance. Making the changes described with limited access would have been very difficult and frustrating.

Rudders and propeller by boaty Admiral   Posted: 25 days ago
Building a scale plastic model like the Schnellboot does involve a lot of creativity and imagination mainly around how to convert it to a working model. Initial stage is how do you get the motors, radio e.s.c and batteries to fit in and to add to this which component of the superstructure is going to be removable for access to inside the hull. Further matters include access to the motor and other working parts should there ever be a failure and need to replace the faulty part. Desired outcome is that you manage it without causing any damage. Greatest reward is at the lakeside when onlookers admire your work of art and are even more surprised how well it sails. Boaty😎😁

BRAVE BORDERER by jbkiwi Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 25 days ago
Good to hear you are making progress with the noise. My ESCs are not programmable as far as I know (There may be a card somewhere). They were cheap Chinese waterproof car/Buggy ESCs with Fwd and Rev which I wanted for independent drives but for the price and how well they work, you can't beat them (about NZ $20 each) They have a very soft start (you can count the revs) programmed in as std, and the only problem I have found is that they sometimes won't go straight into reverse without quickly nudging forward and back, (just need to drive in a scale manner and it's fine.) I'll put a pic of the unit and motor in (also a brushed one I am using in the MTB (x2) which work perfectly only NZ $9.00) They have braking, FWD, FWD+REV and batt type adjustable by jumpers. Throttle set-up is simple with full FWD and partial Rev set by the sticks. Both types are 30A and never even get warm. I purchased some fans for them but have never used them. The brushless units have a fan plug on them. The squealing I have may just require a switching frequency change on the ESC (8kHz/16kHz -more RF noise on 16kHz but more efficient) but I don't think I have that option (do you have that option to try on your set-up ? might be worth a crack). The sound units muffle it a bit anyhow. Boat runs at 10mph (GPS) flat out (looks way off scale) but only needs about 1/4 - 3/4 throttle for normal cruising. Will try to put up an external vid soon. Transmitter is easily modded to twin throttles,- excellent cheap set for boats ( later model has internal aerial)

Eppleton Hall by Ishmael Petty Officer   Posted: 27 days ago
[Score: 10/10] 39" Eppleton Hall Capable of 3mph and a runtime of 60mins Geared to a 540 MFA 919D Powered by Lead Acid (12v) 2Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through VIPER Marine 25 ESC - Comments: I am in the process of building a 32nd scale model of the paddle tug "Eppleton Hall" from scratch, for the most part. The hull is complete now and ready for fiberglass. Stay tuned for progress updates...

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by boaty Admiral   Posted: 27 days ago
It is correct that brushless motors don't modulate as smoothly as brushed. I have had the same problem but now I only use brushless on my fast electrics. 3s lipos do put out a lot of power and as Brave Borderer is a scale model it could be that the speed exceeds the limitations of the hull thus when running on 2s it is more stable. Boaty😋