Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play

Help Support This Website
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.

£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team

Donation History
March 2018: 10 people
February 2018: 8 people
January 2018: 25 people
December 2017: 7 people
November 2017: 13 people
October 2017: 9 people
September 2017: 15 people
August 2017: 10 people
July 2017: 3 people

Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy

Model Boats Website
Active Users (5)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > sea star

sea star
billings sea star
wandering star
coastal barge
seasons trophy
sea star
Main deck and cabin walls by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
Sorry the advertised Flash Gordon reel has gone 'walkies' so you'll have to make do with this boring description of how to occupy a day or three and stink out the house!😁 After the eventual success with the cabin roof I continued with the main deck using essentially the same process. First I had to extend the planking (engraving) from cabin leading edge back to the transom. Dad had only done the foredeck. Pic 1 shows starting point. AKA Square One! Pic 2 after initial staining, pseudo planking and sealing. Plank engraving was done with a fine hardened steel scriber / centre punch and a steel rule clamped at 7mm centres. Rule was aligned so that the wood grain pushed the scriber against it. Don't ask how I realised that that was the way to do it (minor Arrrgh!)😡 Anyway, worked out in the end. I had started with cherry wood stain but it came out too bright red so from Krick I obtained some Jotica mahogany stain (also some Oak stain for the decks of my Prince of Wales and Bismarck - but that's another pair of Sagas to be.) Using basically the same process as for the cabin roof: two sealing coats, two matt varnish primer coats, two gloss varnish coats, two protective lacquer coats, polishing with cutting polish and top gloss polish, and lots of patience and elbow grease (this time an Italian Lugana😉) pics 3 to 5 show the result. I'm 'appy with that 😊 Note: to remove build up of sanding residue from the 'planking caulking' I had to resort to an old toothbrush or nail-brush from time to time. The sponge couldn't hack it. The aft deck 'hatch' is still the temporary bodge-up I made 25 years ago to quickly get the boat going for my daughter. Think the ply (ca 4mm) came from the back of an old bureaux! Haven't decided yet whether to make the new one from the same mahogany as the roof or thin ply and stain like the main deck. Suggestions welcome please. After the deck time to turn my attention to the cabin walls, looking pretty shabby and full of over-spray - pic 6 😲 Step 0: masking off, pics 7 & 8 'All Dressed Up and Nowhere To Go'🤔 Step 1: mucho sanding starting with 180 grit and working through to 600 ensuring removal of all traces of blue as I wanted the final finish to be Arctic White (not Ice Blue!) Step 2: two sealing coats, flattening with 600 grit. Step 3: spraying with Revell white primer, not impressed, gave a rough dusty finish🤔 Step 4: sand off Revell muck, flat back with 1000 and 1500 grit sponges, respray with two coats of pro white primer, flattening with 1500 and 2000+ soap respectively. Much better 😊 like the proverbial baby's ...! Step 5: two coats of gloss white, same make as the primer!!!, flattening with 3000 grit sponge, wet + a drop of liquid soap. Step 6: two coats of protective lacquer as with the varnish. Flattening with 3000 and soap between coats only. Interesting effect with this lacquer and the paint (as opposed to the varnish); it seemed to 'melt and fuse' with the paint surface and smooth it out.😊 Just had to be careful not to apply too much at once in case it all ran down and took the paint with it! Step 7: finishing with cutting polish and anti-hologram polish. Results: pics 9 - 11. Final effect makes it look and feel like plastic or fibreglass, almost forgot that there is wood underneath😁 Next in this theatre "Hi Ho Silver Awaaaayyyy!" (Sponsored by KiOra!) or 'I'm gonna finish this hull if it kills me!' (sorry Flash reels got lost in the post😡) Cheers Doug 😎

The Saga of the Cabin Roof or - Arrrgh! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Typical of Aeorokits the cabin roof skin was made of two thin pieces of ply < 1mm. Over the 50 years or so the overhang corners had started to curl up and crack 😲 Pics 1 & 2 show the 'off the shelf' condition after 25 years of neglect 🤔. First I tried to correct this by soaking in hot water and flattening under a car battery (flattens most things😉). So far so good. Then some super glue in the cracks and back under the battery. After a day or two it just curled up again. Ho hum! Pour a glass of wine and back to the thinking board. Seconds Out - Round Two! Thought, OK make new pieces from the 0.6mm ply I still have and paint it - then my eye fell on some 1mm mahogany sheet (Ouch 😭). Tried to make the whole roof skin in one piece of this but the compound curve defeated me. The skin was steamed and soaked in hot water and clamped across the roof frame. Next morning - Arrrgh! Had started to crack along the centre line 😭 More thinks!! Carefully cut down the middle and glued and clamped the separate pieces; pics 3&4. Getting the two pieces to match in the middle was a tedious ***!!! Pic 5. Then mucho sanding. followed by 2 coats of Lord Nelson sealer, sand back with 600 grit sanding sponge. Then two coats of Lord Nelson matt varnish, sanding with 1000 grit in between. then two coats of Lord Nelson gloss varnish, sanding with 2000 grit in between. Pic 6. So far so good, pic 6. 3rd coat of varnish and - Arrrgh 2! 😡 Pic 7. No idea why! Sand off and start again, pic 8 😭 Treated each side separately, pics 9 & 10 and flatted off with 2000 grit. Then applied three coats of clear protective lacquer, sanding with 3000 grit between coats. Finally cutting back with auto paint restorer / cutting polish and finally polishing with anti-hologram finishing polish. Pic 11. Now I'm happy 😊 Pic 12. Only took a week 😉 Next week in this theatre - "I love you too Flash but we've only got 15 minutes to save the world"! or 'Will I ever get this hull finished?" 😎

Rear Cabin construction by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
today has seen the rear deck and cabin constructed. I lined the deck piece with some mahogany strip for a neater finish on the edge of the crapy liteply. Construction of the cabin was straight forward, this was followed by shaping, sanding, filling any gaps and a couple of coats of sanding sealer ready for paint. I have also added the railings and stanchions to the roof of the cabin as a start to the detailing to come. I have ordered a book from Amazon which is a reference book of the Waveney Class lifeboats, so hopefully there will be ample photos for the detailing I hope to add as we go on!

more progress. by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
First job today was to reduce the rudders by 1cmx1cm which I think not only looks better but should reduce the affects that have been mentioned in comments below. Ive fitted the cockpit which I assembled yesterday. Its not the best fit into the deck, however, I shall blend it all in with some balsa strip, sand, filler, sanding sealer hopefully for a seamless finish. I have pictured the 2 x Hobbyking waterproof boat 30 amp esc. These are supposed to be water cooled, however I am not going to fit the tubing and start drilling water pickup and exit holes in the hull x 4 until I think that water cooling is going to be necessary. Once I have watt meter readings for 2S and 3S lipo, it will give me an idea what the ESC are going to be like. Of course if you guys think I need to go water cooling, please let me know! I have an Mtroniks W-tail mixer that will allow the motors to be synched to the rudders allowing the inboard motor to slow or stop when turning. Never used one before, so may need to some programming once hooked up, we shall see. Last job today was to shoot a could of coats of red oxide primer on the lower hull to see what the resin finish was like. on the whole not a bad finish at all, just a could of tiny areas that need a little sanding for a faily blemish free finish.

Cabin Sides Glued in Place! by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
I've glued the cabin sides in place. I've also put the front of the cabin as well! I have one seam on the cabin starboard side. Which will need to be filled. A bit of Bondo (P38) will do the trick!

Glass clothing commenced by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Spent most of the morning sanding, flating, sanding sealer, small amounts of filler where needle before a final coat of sealer and last sand. Left with a super smooth external hull! I’m hoping to cloth the hull in no more than 3 pieces starting with the transom as seen in the picture. Might be a bit slow next few days as back in day shift from tomorrow, might be able to sneak it into work Saturday?

Decks in, ready to sand, fill and cloth! by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
Been a slow few days with work and chores around the house, but managed to get in the workshop today. Fore, centre and aft decks in, nose block rough shaped and glued, gunwales fitted. I’ve faced the rear and fore deck thingys with1:32 ply for a neater finish and replaced the kit gunwale thingys with a sandwich of 1:32 ply and 1:32 balsa. Tomorrow I have a “me” day as wife at work and I’m off work, so it will be a good chance to sand hull, filler were needed, sanding sealer, more sanding ready to start glass clothing Tuesday all being well.

Skinning the hull (bottom) by mturpin013 Captain   Posted: 1 month ago
The boat has to be placed upside down so first thing to do is to modify the base board so the hull is firm to be able to do any final trimming. Before the skins are fitted the bow areas have to be sealed being careful not to seal the parts which are to be glued The instructions say that the lower skins are fitted first and as they are 6mm oversize this allows for trimming to achieve a good fit. After some time I got a fit I was happy with from the stern to the start of the bow curve so at this point I pinned the skin at the B2,3,4,5 leaving enough material to trim to the bow curve prior to bending . The bending was done simply by soaking in hot water for 5 - 7 mins and then forming around a suitable paint tin and left overnight to dry. Before fitting I decided to trim the skin at the front bow area where it has a butt joint with the side skins, easier than trying to cut it out after it had been glued. Point to note was that while the bending was being carried out, I also bent he side skins as well. Having pre drilled all the holes for the pins and ensured the fit is as good as I can get I can now epoxy the first skin on.

Too Powerful Brushless ? by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
sorry to bore everyone with repeated info, as a similar question was posed recently. I agree with the fact that shaft is too thin, it very much looks llike a fibreglass very light racing boat set up, now this doesnt mean you cant go fast with your boat, but you need components that are up to lugging a big heavy lump of wood around the pond, not a lightweight feather😊 I have 5mm shafts, less whipping. and I have oilers so they are lubricated with oil rather than grease, just my preference. You can get these shafts from shg marine, they will supply with push in aceteal (probably spelt wrong!) water lubricated bearings, real cheap, so you can change then every season if you want. The shaft has to be supported, where it exits the hull, just put it through another piece of ply, and fill the void with epoxy, and double up the former thingy it goes through in the same way. (pic) The prop you used is the wrong blade type, thats probaly why it fell apart, plus the soldered on blades are a weak design for higher speed, simon higging is one piece, but at this stage, still testing, you can get plastic "x" blade ("s" blade are less speed)_ props again from shg marine for a few quid each, then you can test a few different sizes. If you jump in for an expensive brass one, and its wrong, its wasted money. As a starting point, 35mm, 40mm and 45mm, if you dont have any way of testing with data logging etc, you are doing short runs, with the smallest first, and seeing if the motor gets hot etc, and what sort of speed you are doing. My brushless motors are generally 800 to 900kv, and achieve 25mph in four foot heavy hulls, you want lower kv for torque, not high kv high rev motors. I got into thsi 10 years ago, thwere was NO advice around then as it was new tech in boats so I learnt the hard way😭 When (if) you go to a brass prop, the "cleaver" blade design (pic) works well, I did extensive testing with my Huntsman and fireboat and was lucky enough to have Simon Higgins testing props with me on my boats, again because what I was doing, large scale boats, but going very fast, was unique, and the cleaver design was the best at the time. Forget the fear of lipo, and brushless, they go as slow as your throttle stick is pushed, 👍

Spraying/hand painting by RichardSReade Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
After modding my Sea Queen with the new prop shaft I decided to smarten it up as the previous spray job I did was not too good, well I have had terrible trouble with it, the first attempt saw the original paint raise as I sprayed it with a primer that was supposed to be safe with all paints, so I removed as much as i could using the heat gun and a scraper, after sanding down and filling, I started again, i had some small patches raise up where I could not get the original paint completely removed, but after letting it dry and some wet and dry I managed to get a good primer coat on it. I then decided to spray it all white, so as I have always had good results with halfords own brand I gave it some light coats of white gloss, I was unable to get a reasonable gloss finish and it also needed some more filling, funny how a gloss coat show up all the defects, well subsequent attempts at spraying were useless, run after run and a poor gloss finish. All I can think is that I could not have had the area blanketed off in the workshop warm enough and the thinners in the paint was not drying as it hit the boat and just ran. I am now half way into sanding it all back and have decided to hand paint, What is the best paint and method to getting a near spray paint finish by hand brushing?

replacing propshaft by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Heartily agree on all points Chris👍 I am faced with the same decision with the restoration of my Sea Scout. On the basis of 'if it ain't broke don't fix it' I decided to leave the shaft angle as Dad built it in the mid sixties to fit his Taycol Target. I've now fitted a brushless and made a new shaft for the original tube, repainted hull and fitted out the 'engine room'. Pics show starting point and current state. Can't wait for the weather to warm up to try her out😉 I'm aiming for a trim at rest slightly nose up and water about 1/2 inch or so up the transom. Then trials to see if she comes easily on the plane and is stable. As usual a bit of trial and error, aka 'suck it and see' 😁 Happy Holidays and sailing all, cheers Doug 😎

replacing propshaft by RichardSReade Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
Chris, the boat is the Sea Commander, a boat my late father started in the 60's and I got to grips with it in 2015 but only floated it this year. Mark, I have just got in from the workshop and saw your comments, well guess what, after shortening the new shaft by an inch and running a 4mm die down the inner shaft and trimming it to suit, I had a brainwave, why don't I try to fit the new shaft inside the old tube which would solve the problem with the hole in the hull and keel, so I cut the old one to the required length and tapped the brass bush from the end, the inner diameter of the old tube was too small, so on the lathe with it and fed a drill down it from both ends, as I did not have a drill long enough, so the old tube is in place and the new shaft assy is fitted, all I have to do now is epoxy the whole set up. Mark have I measured the shaft angle correctly, using the keel as the flat line?

Sea Queen Prop Shaft by AndyG009 Lieutenant   Posted: 4 months ago
Boat is still pile of its parts. Moving motor to rear, I thought that would increase the shaft angle, though it will shorten the length of the shaft? The Sea Queen is I think 46", kit, overlander 5045, 6250 mAh 3S LiPo, Fusion hawk HV 60 esc (not sure but this might be better with 80 or 100), [expect power about 400W], prop 45 / 50 / 55 mm (not sure which to start with, might start with 45 mm). Been looking at a shaft from Deans models.

Pool try outs by GARTH Captain   Posted: 5 months ago
Nov.13 2017 Spencers pool is being drained for winter skate rink so rushed Sea Commander for a pool try out & shake down . still needs windows & some deck accessories . One of the members suggested to get some tint from a shop that tints car windows & got some tint film for free thanks for that idea . Hope the winter flies by so summer sailing can start again .

BRAVE / PERKASA MTB by Wingcoax Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 months ago
From memory the centre prop was used in harbour or for station keeping at sea. when required the "wing" engines were started. I remember many years ago watching one leave Yarmouth harbour on the isle of Wight and the sound was incredible.