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>> Home > Tags > sea star

sea star
aquastar
billings sea star
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starlet
wandering star
coastal barge
seasons trophy
sea star
Older Billings Models by Tica Commander   Posted: 13 days ago
That is a BB Samson II, using the same ABS hull as Sea Star and Polar and as you state from the late 80's- beginning of the 90's. DMI and BB were competitors in the 60-80's and the wooden model names are often mixed up, between them. This at least in Denmark.

Older Billings Models by Tica Commander   Posted: 14 days ago
Happy new year to you to I would believe that the Samson is DMI Samson http://www.radiostyrt.no/forum/modellb%C3%A5ter/byggeprosjek... The yacht could be BB Neptun (I have a complete kit and a copy of the drawing on stock), Sea Star or Sea King both is with ABS hull. It could also be DMI admiral. But I don't recall any DMI / BB yachts that was to be painted yellow. Regards Carsten

Older Billings Models by Brianaro Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 15 days ago
Hello Garth, happy new year to you too. I built Billing Sea Adler in the late ‘70s. About ten years ago I started Mary Anne but have yet to complete it. Somewhere I think I still have a 1970s Billing catalogue, I’ll try and look it out at some stage when I get a chance. Billing I think are very good models.

Deck, servo mount by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 23 days ago
Put together a pilot house based on some tugs I've seen. Just freelanced it as I went. I build a lot with styrene so I am used to just cutting and building. I use liquid styrene cement that fuses the materials together. See photo, will trim it out as I mount it, need to add some detail at roof and some Navigational lighting. Put on on 3mm plywood deck, same as hull bottom. The deck is also curved (proper term is SHEAR) and I started to build up some wood edge at the opening. Will sand everything well, then start sealing and priming all surfaces. Made a bracket for the rudder servo mount and an adjacent platform for the ESC and RX. Ordered two 6v 5ah SLA batteries. I will wire in parallel to stay with 6v and get 10ah. I like to stay with 6 volts as I want the motor to run slow like a tug should. Will wire in an in-line fuse. Haven't decided where I will put switch, up high somewhere to avoid water. I will show the wiring once I get to it. This build is going fast because it's a simple design, just what I was looking for. I work on it late afternoons and into the evening while I watch basketball games. About 4 hrs a day. Looking forward to building the hatch and getting some primer started tomorrow. Regards, Joe 👍

My other hobby by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Just recalled one of my weirder experiences on a commercial flight! Was also on the memorable trip to Uganda end of the 80ies, just after Idi Amin had left the stage! Was on a hop from Nairobi to Kampala (Entebbe). Aircraft was a venerable Boeing 727of Kenya Airways. Had a funny feeling climbing aboard as I saw the oil streaks over the wings and underside of the fuselage. The smell inside and state of the floor was more like a public toilet than a commercial aircraft.😡 After taking my window seat I was joined by a large 'native' Momma, who took up the remaining two seats in the row, and then I realised why the floor was as it was.😲 She plumped herself down with a big grin all round and carefully settled a large wooden crate with slats on her expansive lap! The crate was full of LIVE CHICKENS!!!!!!!!!!!! At first my ghast was absolutely flabbered😲 I expected that next someone would start building a fire to roast one, but it turned out to be quite funny and even useful! When the 'In flight meal' arrived it looked to me like old British Rail sandwiches (banana shaped) that they had sold on around 1960! I spent the rest of the flight feeding them to the chickens to the delight of 'Momma' and others around us, not to mention the chickens 😁 If you fly around long enough, and to off beat places, all sorts of odd things can happen! 😉 Priceless memories 😊 Cheers all, Doug 😎

All hooked up, nowt happens... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
You're as BAD as me Boaty 😉 but I had a Rover 2000 with fully reclining seats back then - no problem 😁 Re 3 wires on a brushless. Simply put, this is analogous to a 3 phase AC motor (such as used in bathroom extractor fans etc). If you apply a single phase AC voltage to an AC motor it just twitches backwards and forwards in the same place as the voltage crosses from the positive to the negative half cycle. Thus 3 phases are applied giving 3 'shoves' in sequence to keep things moving. A starter capacitor is also needed to give the motor a 'belt' to shove it off. Similarly with a brushless: the ESC senses where the motor armature is in relation to the magnet poles and applies a DC pulse to the next armature coil in sequence. When you shove the throttle up the pulse width lengthens applying a longer shove and thus more energy and speed. Pulling the throttle back with a reversible ESC just turns the pulse train upside down so that negative DC pulses are applied to the motor, reversing the magnetic field created in the armature and thus the rotation. Simple really. It's the sensing and timing done inside the ESC that's the tricky bit, which is why we had to wait about a hundred years from the invention of the AC motor (Nikolai Tesla) until we could use them in models - thanks to micro-electronics. Here endeth today's seminar 😁😁 Happy brushlessing Folks, cheers, Doug 😎 Hmmm, perhaps that's why electric toothbrushes use brushed motors! 😁😜

Equipment wire by b111yboy71 Seaman   Posted: 3 months ago
Hello, try looking for old 25way data cables at your local car boot sale. The cores are multi-coloured and very thin. Most LEDs only use a breath of current to drive them so you won't start a fire! Here's a tip about dropper resistors for LEDs: put them at the power supply end where you can tie them down securely. Also, the formula for finding the resistance you need is: R equals Volts(supply) minus Volts needed by LED (Vf) divided by the required LED current (If). So, say 12V supply, 2V LED wanting 15mA = 12-2=10/.015 = 666.667, so you'd use the nearest value above, which would be 680ohms. Easy! The size of the resistor in watts/milliwatts is found by I(current) times E(volts), so 10X.015=.15W, or 150mW. Hope I'm not teaching an old sea dog new tricks! Starting a new Firefloat - oh boy.😲

Spraying Again....... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Neville, Check out my Sea Scout 'Jessica' renovation blog for how to achieve good paint finish! 'Wet n dry' is the ONLY way to go. Right from the priming stage. It stops the 'riding' you describe and the generation of flying dust which is anathema to any paint or varnish finish, but you do have to clean and re-wet the paper and the object you are sanding from time to time!!! Any mistakes at that stage will carry through to the top coats and still be visible 😡 Don't quite understand how you created 'mouths'. I'm wondering if you sprayed too close and/or too heavy!? Your apparently exorbitant paint consumption seems to hint at this🤔 For the record; I started with 240 on the primer/filler for my Sea Scout and worked up through 400, 600, 1000, and 2000 and 3000 for the final top coats and deck varnish. All 'Wet', with a few drops of liquid soap added at the top coat stages, i.e. from the 1000 stage. At the end I polish with a mild cutting polish 'Anti hologram' they call it here, from the auto industry. Tedious I agree and a generous dollop of patience is required (the 'Secret Ingredient' I have often mentioned here 😉 But when you see the result it warms the cockles and makes it all worthwhile.😊 Happy spraying, cheers, Doug 😎 BTW; for the blue on my Sea Scout hull I used a 400ml rattle can for several coats (more than three in the end) and there's still some left ! BTW2; For masking I use Tamiya tape for nice crisp edges. Fill in behind that with 'normal' fine masking tape and newspaper.

Rudders and Propellers by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
BTW; I copied your above massive text block into a document file and split it up into paragraphs so I could see where you're at! My conclusion: so far so good BUT! You made the one classic mistake of many model boat / ship builders 🤔 You continued the prop shaft tube right back to the propeller and hence you had to make oversize struts to support them. This is fundamental wrong and creates unnecessary work.😉 On real ships, including the Schnellboote, the so called 'stuffing tube' is JUST THAT, it 'stuffs' the shaft through the hull and includes stuffing glands to prevent the ingress of sea water. Outside the hull ONLY the rotating shaft itself continues on through the bearing in the support strut and to the prop. See attached pics of my HMS Belfast as an example. There was actually no reason for you to make oversize strut bearings, simply bushes to match your prop SHAFT not the tube would have been correct. Inside the real ship there is also NO TUBE, only bearings at suitable intervals. They look like gigantic versions of the big ends in your car. Imagine on really big ships, carriers, container ships, bulk tankers etc, with shaft diameters of 1metre or so how big the 'tube' would be, how much weight that would add and how difficult it would be to service and maintain! I've often noticed in posts here that folk confuse shaft and tube, often referring to the whole assembly as 'the shaft'. For convenience we modellers use prop tubes, who wants to fiddle about making a row of internal shaft bearings no one will ever see and will most likely never be really concentric? The downside is that continuing this 'convenience' outside the hull is wrong, adds weight and detracts from the scale appearance of the model. 😭 OK, it's 3am here now so - orf me 'obby 'orse and up (in my case down!) the wooden stairs to Bedfordshire, G'night all, cheers, Doug😎 Re shaft length: What fits fits, what don't don't! Such a question is like asking 'How long is a piece of string?'! If all three motors abreast won't fit you have to decide if the central motor should / will fit fore or aft of the outer motors. Then measure / adjust the shaft length accordingly. Before you start fitting the centre motor check what length shafts are commercially available and adjust your motor fit to suit. Otherwise make your own shafts and tubes to fit as required, as I've started doing cos I got fed up with 'standard sizes' wot don' wanna fit my ship. 🤔 G'night All, cheers, Doug 😎

A Tragic Tale Unfolds by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
About a month ago I came across a wooden model of a Side Trawler by the name of ‘Maartje’ dating from what I assume was the Sixties. It is 84 cm long (33 inches) with a beam of 19cm (7.75 inches). The then owner had found it in a poor state and had reconstructed and painted to a large degree, but then turned to model trains. It was not known whether it was a ‘kit’ or ‘scratch’ built but he had however found it was a model of a boat, UK 223, lost with all hands in the North Sea off Texel (NL) in 1967 thought to be registered in Diss UK.. I am aware that such a tragedy is not uncommon with sea fishermen but I had never come across a model of such a boat. I had some time on my hands so I started to make enquiries and I was surprised how helpful people were. I had contacted the Dutch Embassy in UK, the Press Association in Netherlands and the Texel Tourist Information Centre. Within a very short time I had responses not just from those sources but also from others they had contacted. A major response was from the Embassy with the names of the crew of five, some were never recovered and important, was information from the Harbour Master of the Port of Urk, Netherlands confirming the boat was registered there and who then contacted the son of the captain of the ‘Maartje’ and gave him my contact details. I am pleased to say the captain’s son Jauwk contacted me and we are now in frequent communication. So we now know the date of the loss, the sea area, weather conditions names of the crew and results of the enquiry. Also very personal and emotional information including the fact that two of the crew were father and son and that the captain’s wife was carrying his son, Jauwk at the time of the loss. You never know what this hobby may lead you into. NPJ.

Pretend deck planking by steve-d Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
Thanks for the reply. Had already sussed the curved planks but think I will stick to a simple join to the king plank. Just bought some fibre tip pens 0.3mm which should do the job. So, seal and sand the ply first?...the ink would track into the grain otherwise. Doing it before fitting means you can bin it if not happy or turn it over and start again.

Another toy pond yacht???? by Colin H. Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Well Martin, the cloth is full of small holes and when I tried to put them on the seams started to give way. Also I think there should be some lead attached to the keel, there are hole in it and a feint shading difference about an inch wide along the bottom edge both sides. Cheers Colin.

Rudders and Propellers by teejay Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi all for the second blog report on the schnellboot I am going to go over the rudder a propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat, these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts. which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel) and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum powder mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The fourth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I must ask for some help could anyone advise me on the length of propeller shafts, I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft, but port and starboard will have to be longer. and I also need advice on selecting the motors, I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.

Kingsmere Model Boat Club by Ray Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 4 months ago
Sorry no photos ,but I remember back in the late 60's early 70's spending some enjoyable Sunday afternoons sitting by the pond with my wife and children watching the straight running events against the Victoria club I believe,so that and seeing a guy with radio control air sea rescue launch got me started building model boats something which I had last done as a nipper.Does the King's mere club still exist,last time I went by the pond a few years back it had shrunk in size and was very overgrown around the edges.

Taycol Supemarine Resurrection by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Hi Colin, re your post in the scale speed thread- "I've got spare Viper marine 25 amp. So hopefully that will do. Also would you recommend a reduction box to give a fair scale speed as I don't want to overwork the motor." The Viper will be fine, I'll probably be using a little Viper Marine 10 on my Taycol Target in the fish cutter. Re gearbox: I doubt one is necessary. I would try to adjust the top speed more with the prop, mainly the pitch probably. The Supermarine is not particularly hi-revving, 4000 or so off load? If you reduce that your Sea Commander may behave more like a tug I suspect If you do decide to go that way PLEASE don't ask me to make it😁, I'm having enough trouble with the 1to1 gearing for my fish cutter😲 Good luck with bathroom and OP. Fingers crossed for you that the works DO start in 6 weeks (the bathroom I mean!) 😉 Cheers, Doug 😎