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>> Home > Tags > sea star

sea star
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It's a sad day!. by Westquay Admiral   Posted: 5 days ago
Thanks for your support gents, but I'm too old to kick too much arse these days. The Sea otter I'm not completely sure of, but the Super Hunter 3 1/2 cc,. was indeed a boat only motor and had a throttle on the exhaust rather than the inlet and the result was that it never came off the 2 stroke, so sounded very strange. But it was incredibly responsive and was demonstrated to an appreciative crowd at one of the race course big shows nearish London. Can't say which as I don't do nags, but on the temporary pond in a typical -for -the -time flattie boat, it was VERY impressive for a diesel and started easily too.....Kempton Park, methinks. All ED engines look like they mean business and run really well. We'll be making our own fuel again for lack of supply. Always used to, but poncy chemists won't sell you anything stronger than cough mixture these days. I could always get my Uncle some amyl nitrate when he asked me to. Don't know where he got the ether from, but it always got his little ED Bee going and was ace in my Racer. BTW, the Mk 4 was the precursor to the Racer. Looked a little earlier by being spindly and taller. Martin (the Anarchists' Boat Club)

It's a sad day!. by stormin Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 days ago
Ian, I thought all ED where compression ignition (diesel) so not sure what yours could be. I still have a seagull (1cc) hunter (2.5cc) and a sea otter (3.5cc) I believe that the sea otter was the only engine ED made specifically for use in boats (water cooled) because the flywheel was at the opposite end of the crank eliminating the need to thread your starter cord under your prop shaft and u.j. Norman.

It's a sad day!. by IanD Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 days ago
Someone mentioned ED motors! My Dad's old Sea Commander had one before I converted it to electric, but I still have it (in a box on the wardrobe!) Can anybody tell me anything about it? It is marked as an ED MK4 with what looks like a serial number of 4G147. It is water cooled and has a variable throttle. I cant see how the ignition worked but it has a large tug-start fly/pully wheel on the drive shaft. Any info gratefully received. Ian

It's a sad day!. by Westquay Admiral   Posted: 5 days ago
Oliver Tiger and Gannet? Oh be still my beating heart! I remember seeing a Gannet and a Channel Island Special at Victoria when I was a kid with my Dad. Even he was impressed. And Olive Cockman had a Westbury Seal she'd built herself and fitted in a large cruiser, which she used for straight running and steering, where you nominated a spot on the lake side and set off your model with a fixed rudder. The nearer you got to your nominated spot the more points you got. Never hear of it these days. R/C doesn't appeal to me apart from steering a yacht, although free-sailing is still appealing to me. I have engines, but I haven't got any in a boat as I could never get the things to start. I just like having them around and running them screwed to an outbuilding, when they'll run! I can't be doing with all the fuss of LiPos and charging them properly. Too expensive, so it's NiMhs for me, charged in a wall charger. but it's really building stuff I like to do. Martin

Fun Sail by deepdiver Lieutenant   Posted: 8 days ago
Hi On the 20th May we are having a Fun Sail at the Swiss Cottage Shoreham on Sea Sussex Start time is 10.30am As our lake is in the grounds of a Public House this would make a good day out for all the family. In the grounds there are tables, a play area for the children, the pub has food from 12.00 alone with tea and coffee.

Rudders and propeller by teejay Lieutenant   Posted: 19 days ago
Hi all for the second blog report on the schenllboot I am going to go over the rudder an propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat , these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts .which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel)and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum power mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The forth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I have to ask for some help could any one advise me on the length of propeller shafts , I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft but port and starboard will have to be longer . and I also need advice on selecting the motors , I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.

LiPo batteries by ronrees Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 23 days ago
Hi all, Lithium-Ion and Li-Po batteries do not take kindly to being stored long term fully charged. When they are new they will do it but after 2 to 3 years of intermittant use, can start to swell a bit and that is where the dangers start. When you give these cells the final run of the season and they show a charge in the the 3.3 to 3.5 (or so) volts per cell then they can be stored relatively safely. (This is called a holding or factory charge) Re start them with a balanced charge before you next use them. Do not constantly fast charge them as thi could induce swelling of the pack earlier. The old Ammo box is a good idea, any strong metal box will do but store them where it does not get very hot or very cold and ideally not in the house. Lipo cells are accepted as hand luggage by most airlines and a holding charge is recommended when flying, so remember to take a small 12v DC balance charger or 'Intelligent' charger with you to other countries, you will always be sure of a power supply, like a car battery even where the mains voltage is different. Small black plug-in cell monitors are readily available from places like Component shop and are a good guide to cell condition. One is these is quite essential as we use these cells more and more. Cheers, hope this helps. Ron.

Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by kmbcsecretary Admiral   Posted: 1 month ago
That's correct Doug each plank needs to be shaped and sealed as you go. This will be my first clinker hull and just hoping not to many mistakes happen and don't need to scrap it and start again but that's model building 😵 . Don't worry Doug I won't be sanding the clinkers out its took me long enough to find out the details of the ships boat as no info in the plans Ron

Bits n pieces arrived / Aft Deck Mk 2 built ;-) by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
6mm lime wood planks from Krick and 4mm tap from Conrad arrived on Wednesday so Full Speed Ahead. This time formers were made from the 6mm lime so no bending or slitting required, new piece of mahogany cut so that this time no inserts left an right were needed. 😊 Formers attached using Rocket cyano and a bag of clamps and left overnight. The 'Riva' tank filler caps were tapped 4mm and appropriate holes bored in the deck piece. Neodymium magnets attached to forward edge. Deck fitted and trimmed in situ for flush fit all round. Transom got scratched during this process so will need a respray🤔 Underside sealed with two coats of EzeKote and sealing / varnishing / lacquering process started on the topside. Last two pics show current status; So Far So Good.😉 Next step; fit windows made of 3mm green tinted acrylic 'glass', which also arrived Wednesday. Will now have to start thinking about what to do in the cockpit 😲 All I have so far is a 25mm ship's wheel. Furniture building is not exactly my Forte! First time for everything I suppose! Suggestions gratefully received!! Ciao for now, Doug 😎 Almost forgot! While waiting for varnish to dry I tackled an old problem with the rudder. Namely; asymmetric rudder throw caused by the rather bulky connecting rod binding on the rudder arm! Suddenly remembered I still had some E-Z Connectors from old aircraft days. Been hanging around for 35 years or so waiting for something to do! So replaced the old plastic linkage with 1mm spring steel rod and two E-Z connectors. Works a treat 😊

Background Information by CB90 Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
HSL100 Type 2 High Speed Launch 63 feet 21.5 tons 39 Knots 1941 built by The British Power Boat Company and popularly known as the 'Whaleback' (as the cabin looks like a whale diving). The craft operating in the North Sea / English Channel. Their armament consisted of any weapon which the crew could find, they started of with a single 303 in each ball turret and progressed to twin 303's, also some had two paired 303's on twin mounting posts and a 20mm on the rear deck where the life raft was originally. Between the 15th July 1940 and October Britain lost 215, hard to replace, pilots and aircrew to the seas. Thus in February 1941, with the motto "The sea shall not have them".The Air Sea Rescue Services (ASRS) were created, which later became the RAF Search and Rescue Force. :- 122 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 123 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 124 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 125 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 126 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 127 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 128 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 129 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 130 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 131 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 132 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 133 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 134 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 135 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 136 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 137 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 138 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 139 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 140 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 141 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 142 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 143 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 144 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 145 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 146 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 147 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 148 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 149 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK - 156 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 157 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 158 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 159 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 161 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 162 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 163 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 164 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 165 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 166 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 168 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 169 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 171 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 172 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 173 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 174 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 175 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 176 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 177 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 178 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 179 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 180 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 181 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 182 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 183 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 185 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 186 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 187 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 188 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 189 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 190 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK - 2250 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK - 2546 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 2547 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 2548 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 2549 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 2550 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK 2551 63ft BRITISH POWER BOAT HSL WHALEBACK By the end of WWII more than 8,000 aircrew and 5,000 civilians had been rescued by the service. The role of aircraft in the ASRS was to locate downed airmen and help them, by dropping them survival equipment and stores, while they waited for an ASRS launch to pick them up.

up date by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I can well appreciate that Cliff, I'm finally beginning to see results on my Sea Scout renovation. Have started on the twiddly bits like deck fittings. Your railings look really neat, I doff my hat😉 Cheers Doug 😎

Wianno Senior by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Progressing well. The removable roof above the cabin was just clamped; seats have been started; exterior of the hull will be fibreglassed and resin applied to the interior. I have received mast lengths from the Wianno Senior Association and the gaff and boom too. These will be made from Sitka Spruce later in the month.

Sanding down. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Thanks to you too Peter 👍 Will be watching your progress also with interest. As you have an airbrush you can buy concentrated paint of the exact specific colour you want, don't have to rely on 'well it looks similar' from spray cans, and you will have much more control over spray area and shape, overspray and above all an even spray pressure. Compressor with air tank highly recommended for the latter 😉 I'm collecting the bits and paints for my ELCO PT Boat but I'm determined to finish the restoration / upgrade of Dad's old Sea Scout first. I hope he's looking down and is happy with what I've done with his boat up to now. Spent yesterday making a mahogany aft deck / hatch and sub-frame for it. Now more sanding and varnishing!! Happy painting, Doug 😎PS: before you start with the colour coats on your boat I can highly recommend that you apply a coat or two of primer / filler, not just the thin normal primers. White primer would be better under the light Pacific Green and grey under the antifouling red. 😉

Sanding down. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Peter, you're right about the sanding down. Take your time and apply a generous Dollop of Patience 😉 Any short cuts here will show up all through the painting process 🤔 See my Sea Scout 'Jessica' renovation blog re hull restoration!! My motto for painting is 'Brush for little fiddly bits, spray for big bits' e.g. hulls. I agree model shop spray cans are usually small and relatively expensive for big hull. I use giant cans from the professional suppliers, again see my Sea Scout blog for descriptions and suppliers. Also agree about care with the thin skins. After sanding and sealing, with Lord Nelson pore sealer, I reinforced my Sea Scout inside (where I could get to!) and out with DeluxeMaterials EzeKote resin. It's not the cheapest but it's water based, doesn't pong and doesn't need mixing with hardener Brushes just wash out in warm water. Couldn't be easier 😊 Flat off starting with about 600 or 1000 grit annd work up to 3000 grit and you should end up with a finish like glass - see decks of my Sea Scout😊 For my ELCO PTB I bought Colour Coats MTB Green (from Sovereign Hobbies in UK) for the darker camo patches and Italeri Flat Sky, # 4856, which is almost identical to the lighter Pacific Green for the base coat. After painting and detailing, pennant number and decals and such, I shall seal it all with a matt spray varnish. i use the big Lord Nelson spray cans for that. Re Gun Tubs: love the gun carriages but I guess they're much too big for my 28" boat. 😭 BTW: forward gun tub is too far forward. It should be further aft just in front of the screen round the bridge entrance starboard side and should be set half into the forward cabin. Just cut half of the lower section of the tub away on the inboard side to match the cabin height. See pics. You might find this Pinterest site useful for more detail👍 https://www.pinterest.de/pin/557039047643301834/ Register to get full access, it's free and you can get updates for the things that interest you. Hi Ray, attached are pdf files of the Aerokits plan. Just scale up to what you need and awaaay you go 😉 Look forward to the Blog👍 Cheers Doug 😎

Main deck and cabin walls by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Sorry the advertised Flash Gordon reel has gone 'walkies' so you'll have to make do with this boring description of how to occupy a day or three and stink out the house!😁 After the eventual success with the cabin roof I continued with the main deck using essentially the same process. First I had to extend the planking (engraving) from cabin leading edge back to the transom. Dad had only done the foredeck. Pic 1 shows starting point. AKA Square One! Pic 2 after initial staining, pseudo planking and sealing. Plank engraving was done with a fine hardened steel scriber / centre punch and a steel rule clamped at 7mm centres. Rule was aligned so that the wood grain pushed the scriber against it. Don't ask how I realised that that was the way to do it (minor Arrrgh!)😡 Anyway, worked out in the end. I had started with cherry wood stain but it came out too bright red so from Krick I obtained some Jotica mahogany stain (also some Oak stain for the decks of my Prince of Wales and Bismarck - but that's another pair of Sagas to be.) Using basically the same process as for the cabin roof: two sealing coats, two matt varnish primer coats, two gloss varnish coats, two protective lacquer coats, polishing with cutting polish and top gloss polish, and lots of patience and elbow grease (this time an Italian Lugana😉) pics 3 to 5 show the result. I'm 'appy with that 😊 Note: to remove build up of sanding residue from the 'planking caulking' I had to resort to an old toothbrush or nail-brush from time to time. The sponge couldn't hack it. The aft deck 'hatch' is still the temporary bodge-up I made 25 years ago to quickly get the boat going for my daughter. Think the ply (ca 4mm) came from the back of an old bureaux! Haven't decided yet whether to make the new one from the same mahogany as the roof or thin ply and stain like the main deck. Suggestions welcome please. After the deck time to turn my attention to the cabin walls, looking pretty shabby and full of over-spray - pic 6 😲 Step 0: masking off, pics 7 & 8 'All Dressed Up and Nowhere To Go'🤔 Step 1: mucho sanding starting with 180 grit and working through to 600 ensuring removal of all traces of blue as I wanted the final finish to be Arctic White (not Ice Blue!) Step 2: two sealing coats, flattening with 600 grit. Step 3: spraying with Revell white primer, not impressed, gave a rough dusty finish🤔 Step 4: sand off Revell muck, flat back with 1000 and 1500 grit sponges, respray with two coats of pro white primer, flattening with 1500 and 2000+ soap respectively. Much better 😊 like the proverbial baby's ...! Step 5: two coats of gloss white, same make as the primer!!!, flattening with 3000 grit sponge, wet + a drop of liquid soap. Step 6: two coats of protective lacquer as with the varnish. Flattening with 3000 and soap between coats only. Interesting effect with this lacquer and the paint (as opposed to the varnish); it seemed to 'melt and fuse' with the paint surface and smooth it out.😊 Just had to be careful not to apply too much at once in case it all ran down and took the paint with it! Step 7: finishing with cutting polish and anti-hologram polish. Results: pics 9 - 11. Final effect makes it look and feel like plastic or fibreglass, almost forgot that there is wood underneath😁 Next in this theatre "Hi Ho Silver Awaaaayyyy!" (Sponsored by KiOra!) or 'I'm gonna finish this hull if it kills me!' (sorry Flash reels got lost in the post😡) Cheers Doug 😎