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>> Home > Tags > servo

servo
sail servos
steering servo
servo
Perkasa 49 inch by RNinMunich Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 days ago
Very tidy boat and nice Captain's POV 👍 Next step cam rotation? Limit switches or servo with travel extension ? After that telemetry with video back to base ?? Some sets have a good 5.8Gig back channel for this. I recently bought the Toshiba Sport camera, with a waterproof case, so I might try it on my 107cm 1:72 Type IIA U26 ! Plug in mount instead of the 88 on the foredeck. For rescue I have the Tug Southampton, bought RTR and modified slightly so I can at least push home. Not easy with long thin ships like my destroyer so thinking of a steel plate on the bow and a neodym magnet on the tugs winch 😎

Feathering set up by marlina2 Seaman   Posted: 5 days ago
I am so pleased to see this blog as I am also in the midst of building my own "forcefull". Your build is much further advanced than mine so hopefully I may be able to pick your brain in future about the many problems that I am bound to encounter. Your drive system looks much like mine apart from I am using 2 x 540's low noise motors with built in 16:1 gearbox and the final drive being belt drive reduction giving me a maximum no load rpm of 230 on the paddle rims. I am using an action Electronics dual mixer & ESC's in tank steer mode for speed control. I don't know how it will handle exactly in this mode but I do have the option of a conventional mixer mode with a rudder servo. At the moment my paddles are not feathering, this is just for getting in the water quicker and will be replaced in time when I can access to a lathe to make the ecentrics

Sweet ❤️ ❤️❤️ Heart by Grandpa Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 10 days ago
You have seen it being built. Now it is done. A Nor-Star Kingfisher kit but with some scratch building too. Because of the motor being longer than how the kit was originally designed, the second bulkhead was altered. I am running it with two 2400 Ni-MH 7.2 batteries, a Futoba servo, on a 2.4 GHz Spektrum.

Rudder servo installed and working by Grandpa Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 14 days ago
Making battery boxes, seats for cabin, and rear hatch cover with mahogany veneer.

Making the searchlight. Part one. The metalwork. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
Having decided to make the searchlight a working feature I needed to make a sturdier base for it as the supplied white metal item is far too weak and not up to the job. This is another job for the man with the lathe......😜 I want the new piece to replicate the original as much as possible so I took measurements of the white metal part and produced a dimensional drawing which I e-mailed to my brother. A short while later the item arrived in the post with another as a spare in case I messed up the first! 😓 I annealed some ‘D’ profile brass rod and formed it to the dimensions of the original cradle and set this into a slot filed into the top of the turned searchlight base. Before silver soldering the cradle into place I spun the part in a drill and rounded off the base with some abrasive to a profile more like the original. I also filed flats at the cradle ends and drilled them, and the searchlight body, to accept some 2mm brass screws to join the two parts together. The base has a 2mm diameter hole bored through to accept the drive shaft from the servo and a very small grub screw secures the base onto this shaft. The 3 watt LED is already epoxy into the searchlight body but I will replace the wire with something thinner and bring it out through the back in some heat shrink tubing. I'm hoping that this will be flexible enough to allow free rotation of the searchlight.😊

Kingfisher progress by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Last time I looked the plan clearly showed the rudder well clear of the stern. The prop shaft was much further forward than shown in your latest post. The problem is the rudder post will be too near the transom stern to allow you to fit a linkage to your servo. You need to mark on the hull from the plan where the rudder should be fitted and fit it then adjust the prop shaft to the correct position. Not sure how much room you have between the prop and hull but one solution would be to remove the propshaft and bearing then cut the prop tube and skeg so that there was enough space for the rudder and refit the bearing and propshaft. The alternative is to unglue the prop shaft assembly and move forward to give the space. I believe you used the plans to set the slot in the hull so it should all fit. Sorry probably not what you wanted to hear but your present layout doesn't allow for rudder control. If you wan't to discuss please send me a pm and I will offer any further help you require Dave

Radio kit & batteries by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
My decision to include functional lighting and a rotating searchlight in addition to the usual throttle and rudder functions meant that I had to revise my initial choice of radio kit from a two channel system to at least a four channel system. My final choice was actually a Turnigy TGY-i6 six channel system from Hobbyking. The reviews I read during my research were very complimentary and it certainly fitted within my budget, I actually view it as extraordinary value for money at £44 for the TX/RX combination, my last R/C system was a MacGregor single channel 'clunk-click' system for £20 back in 1970-something when that sum was my weeks wage! 😯 The programming options are predominantly for aircraft and helicopter modellers but that's not a problem as there's all the basic programmable options in the menus that I need. I think I ordered the wrong 'type' of transmitter as I want the throttle on the left with a centre spring return and the rudder on the right stick, a quick strip down and butchers at the internals has shown that I can transpose the stick/pot/gimbal assemblies very easily to suit my preference and swap their functions in the menu options. The standard of construction is remarkably good for such a low cost piece of technology, speaking as someone who has seen and worked on the insides of innumerable bits of broadcast TV kit. The transmitter has four assignable switches, I'll use two for the lighting circuits, and one of the two pots will be ideal for my rotating searchlight. The rudder servo is a Futaba S3003 standard servo with plastic gears, I think anything more would be overkill. I also bought a couple of Turnigy R/C switches to control the lighting circuits and NiMh battery packs for the receiver and lighting supplies as I didn't want to feed these from the main batteries. I cobbled it all together on the bench for a quick test and it all works just as expected including running up the motor through the ESC, I have a programming card for that and I will need to set up the ESC before it goes in the water. The main battery packs are two 9.6v 5000mAh NiMh packs by Vapextech which are wired in series, they sit on a bearers on either side of the propshaft aft of the motor, the receiver battery pack sits between them and all will be strapped down with cable ties.

Elsie & Olwen by twofloats12 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
could you do a simple electics diagram for me as i have burn out two sail servos 😱

burnt out sail winch by twofloats12 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
> 😟 i have burnt out two sail winches type http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayI SAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1211732 84235 they both got got caught around the main spline (came off the drum) have opened them up and found all ok except circuit bourd power in nothing out i took a bourd for a 90 degree servo and soldered that to the potentiometer and and was working well in rig on the bench put in the boat and now stopped can any one help we ideas as to what im doing wrong thanks mark

Tug 'DHB Dauntless' by barnet Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
Scratch Built 1:32 scale Dover Harbour Board Tug, DHB Doughty. The main hull is a standard Damen hull purchased from Mobile Marine Models, see their website for Portgarth. the hull is fitted with 2 x T12 Motors for the main propulsion,2 x 60 degree kort nozzles for steering, with 2 x purpose made brass props. Also fitted is a 12v Graupner water pump for the working fire monitor and Fwd spray bar, 2 x Mtronks 15 amp ESC's, Futaba steering servo and Futaba 40 MHz Receiver. Approx Dimensions including fendering Loa 41" Beam 14"

Sea Rover Help by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Simon. The batteries are laid at each side on boards and will be held in with Velcro, I will be able to position them as far forward as Bulkhead B2 and as far back as B4 depending on how the boat rides. The centre of the cockpit is removable to get at the servo and batteries. The cockpit floor has been raised to allow for servo and batteries. (115mm from top corner of cockpit window frame to the planking) Cockpit roof is removable, note pin on window frame and bolts on cockpit sides. I am hoping not to get too much water in the cockpit so it should be OK. With this kit you need to dry fit all the bulkheads and cabin sides to make sure it all goes together before gluing. If things don't look quite right after you have done this, look at bulkhead B2 Alan

San Pedro Pus Boat - Engine Room Fittings by tomarack Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi, sorely I can not put the wiring diagram here, so please look at my album on Rajce , where I placed the wiring diagram!!! > http://tomarack.rajce.idnes.cz /RC_model_Lulonga/ I do not think you got the wrong V-tail mixer, you just need it put to wiring and properly involve. Therefore, I do not use internal mix at transmitter, and even and cannot program it ( therefore, I chose a simple mixer - it performed only simple mixing of signals, in my case Ail and Throttle , no damned programming!!)   when connecting of engines because you have to program the transmitter to function properly. (Thr forward - backward) and canal -1 ("Ailerons" - adjust the direction of rotation so that when tilting the control stick left, right engine had more speed than the left engine, and vice versa) I have on Lulonga the rudder separately on channel 4 (on my model has a lousy efficiency), but it can be connected via a Y cable to output Ail, where one branch goes to the servo, the second branch to the V-tail mixer, or you can engage Mix, which lead the canal 1 Ail, a slave can 4 - Rudder - wants this just to try. Of course you can try a mix of programming of the transmitter, but I wanted first and foremost a simple electrical connection that works. Then, if you know how that works, then it is easier to try and programming of the transmitter. This I then used my second model, Thames sailing barge Capricorn > http://tomarack.rajce.idnes.cz /TSB_Capricorn/ At the end of this album I gave examples of wiring and mixes too. I made a simple table, and then tried what and how it works. But it is a control model sailboats. For your model table would look different. It depends on what type of transmitter you have. wishing success ! Tom

POLARITY by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Yes some earlier sets from Sanwa used a different protocol to the majority of other systems and I don't believe it was frequency dependant. Present day systems use plugs with (-ve neg) then ( ve pos) then (Pulse). It would be illegal to use for ground based RC. Sanwa used ( ve pos) then (-ve neg) then pulse. Red is usually ( ve pos) whilst Black or Brown is usually (-ve neg) with yellow or white (Pulse). As the power lines are reversed using a different protocol will cause the servo/ESC to fail. It used to be possible to buy conversion leads but I have checked a few suppliers and they no longer stock such items. I suggest you buy some extension leads and swop the pos and neg leads on the plug end. You will then have the correct connection for current servos. If you have SANWA servos and just want to use in modern equipment You will need to swop the plug and move the connections to the current standard. SANWA plugs are too rthick to fit modern receivers. Sorry if this is teaching you to suck eggs but if you are not familiar with the procedure to remove the pins you need to use a scalpel blade to ease the tang up from the visible connection in the plug. Replace in the correct socket and push the tang down to hold the pin in place. Hope this helps Dave 😀

Fitting the wheelhouse roof panels by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
The three panels make up the wheelhouse roof and the outer two needed the heat gun treatment to curve them in two directions so a bit of patience is required here to get this right. When they are correctly shaped the mating edges of all three need a little chamfering, they also need to overlap the cabin walls by 1/8th of an inch. I cut out a hole in the centre panel to give me access to the bracket that hold the searchlight rotation servo in place. Before fitting the roof panels I added a couple of small blocks either side of the cabin formers directly beneath where the mast feet will be to reinforce the areas so that I can bolt down the mast legs on threaded studs and also to enable it's removal for storage if required. Once again I used a file and sanding block over the formers and cabin sides to profile them so that the panels sit flush on the framework. The outer panel on which the searchlight sits was also pierced to take the 2mm threaded stud will connects the servo to the searchlight base. I'll need to make and fit a circular wedge fillet on the roof to meet the searchlight base because of the curvature of the roof at that point. The undersides of the panels got a couple of coats of sanding sealer and a brushed coat of a black satin water based paint, being careful not to coat the areas where the glue lines will be. The rest of the interior of the cabin also got another coat of black paint. The centre panel was fitted first making sure that the hole was correctly aligned with the servo shaft position, when the glue had dried the two outer panels were glued and clamped. I fitted the sliding hatch rails on a couple of bearers and made a frame around the access hole for the hatch to fit onto. The other small hole at the front of the centre panel is for the navigation light wiring. Thankfully that's the end of the superstructure construction which was unnecessarily difficult due to the less than helpful instructions and drawings and poorly fitting parts. Some room for improvement here by the kit maker I think ❓ ..... Next episode coming to screen near you soon.... 😁

DAMEN STAN 4207 by RHBaker Captain   Posted: 3 months ago
The weather has turned colder and forstalled any temptations to spend valuable boat building time outdoors. Have now been able to focus on finishing the hull. This was done with the usual technique of rubbing down (both mechanical and manual) and then filling any depressions or defects with either wood filler or glaze putty. Then rubbing down again ' and again! After each completed rub sprayed the hull with aerosol paint, initially primer, then working up to colour and finally a clear matte to protect the decals and dull the earlier gloss finish. I prefer to use gloss for the intermediate coats as it reveals the surface defects clearly. The only problem encountered was with the opening stern gate, after much trial usage this began to get a 'chatter' during opeation. Dismantled and examined the micro servo and found that several small gear teeth had broken off. Attributed this to operating the gate by hand during the build. In future will only operate the gate under power. Whilst more time consuming this prevents any tendency for the linkage to go over centre and lock up, thus overloading and breaking the small gear teeth. The pictures show the hull finished up to deck level. There are no fittings installed. From now on anticipate the model completion will follow traditional lines, so will confine blog entries to those that either capture a milestone, or where something interesting or unusal has happened.