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Furled sails powered yacht with inboard motor by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 20 days ago
Ron, It's tough to get a smaller boat to sail correctly, at least I have not had much luck. My cutter is 45" and over 30lbs, so I don't think my build will be of much help. Looking at your hull and keel design, typically the prop is in front of the rudder. You would probably have to cut out a half circle in the rudder, check out boats of this design... Joe

U48 Tinplate Clockwork Diving Submarine by mactin Commander   Posted: 26 days ago
Ahoy Mateys, U48,this ones taken me ages due to a brief hiatus brought on by a touch of black death I caught. Anyway another bin salvaged effort made entirely from scrap tin and alarm clocks. No ballast tank in this one,the smaller boats don't need them and dynamic dive on planes alone,or just surface run. Cheers Neil www.mclarenclockworksubmarines.com

A577 by colindavies Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 5/10] 20"/700g A577 - Comments: This model belongs to a friend of mine who had this in his attic where it got damaged and its condition deteriorated, he asked me if I would refurbish it. This is a static model and I have submitted this to help to show the variety of craft that the RAF Marine Branch operated in the 68 years of its existence. The Armoured Target Boat was the brainchild of the Air Ministry's "I've had a good idea" Department. The requirement was for a target boat that could be bombed from the air with practice bombs. The 40ft Armoured Target Boats were developed from the slightly smaller 37.5ft ATBs which had been designed by Scott-Paine and others at British Power Boat in 1932. A couple of years later, in 1934, whilst bringing the first of the 64ft HSLs into service, it was realised by the Air Ministry that the condition of the aircraft had been advancing and that it was necessary to provide additional protection to improve the first type of Armoured Target Boats (the 37.5ft type). T.E. Shaw suggested to Scott-Paine that he should increase the length of the 37.5ft type to 40ft and fit twin rudders. In addition the Air Ministry prepared a new armour plating arrangement which gave separate protection for the crew and engines and coxswain. There was a further alteration to the forward bulkhead which resulted in it being changed to vertical instead of raked fore and aft to overcome the new conditions for bombing. A long series of trials were carried out with the ballast with the 40ft type launch and eventually it was approved. The 40ft thus became the standard type Armoured Target Boat (ATB). The first batch of 15 craft of the 40ft type were ordered in 1935 with further batches being ordered in 1936, 1937 and 1938. A further addition was the introduction of a 3rd engine, this helped to maintain a good speed on the ranges, and helped to counterbalance the the boat as it had been found that in a tight turn the 37.5ft ATB had a tendency to roll over.

Veron Vosper F.P.B. 52" by boaty Admiral   Posted: 3 months ago
The Veron F.P.B does appear to be a very rare model and I feel £300 would be a reasonable price especially when you take into consideration how much a modern day manufacturer would want. Just look at prices for Deans Marine models, mainly their Vosper M.T.B. which is a lot smaller. Also Veron kits seem to have been overlooked and the only model that is easy to obtain is the Slec version of their 26inch River Police Launch. Phil Smith was a great designer of boats and aircraft . I sold my Veron RTTL in the mid 1990s and my fleet today consists of one original Sea Commander, one 34 inch Crash Tender , both of which I restored, an Italeri PT109 and two RTR fast electrics. TOP TIP for anyone who buys your F.T.B- trace around the parts and use them to build the model while keeping the kit intact. I do this with my Keil Kraft control line aeroplanes. B😁😎oaty

St Canute Planking Help? by Richard7 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 4 months ago
Hey guys, I cannot thank you all enough for all these suggestions and advice, what a great website this is!!! I am swaying to purchase some blacks of balsa and give this a try, I did the same with my first model of the Billing Boat Norden (much smaller model) but on that occasion the stern block came with the kit. Does anyone have a website that I can purchase these blacks of balsa? I will try my local Hobbycraft store but they are sadly winding down on a lot of items. It is my intention to paint the St Canute the same colours as Billing Boats suggest, so none of the planks will be varnished but I will have a lot of sanding and shaping to do. Many thanks again to you all,👍 Kindest regards Richard

BRAVE BORDERER by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 4 months ago
Just put up another vid showing the speed at around 2/3 throttle which looks reasonably scale for 38 knots (bit hard to scale water movement as we all know!) and it doesn't squeal too much at this speed. Just been back through my old info on the ESCs and found I may be able to change a few things (forgot due to approaching dotage and so many projects on electric (18 planes as well converted from ic to electric) I was thinking with your high kv motors that if you can get away with smaller props or some the scale diam bit finer pitch props, that would allow the motors to rev how they should, but give you finer control. As I mentioned before, on 8v per motor they will spin at around 16-18000 rpm and won't like a big load (you've no doubt heard those delta wings scream) . My props are 28mm x 3 blade on a 2000kv motor and are spinning at around 12000 rpm (probably around 8000 rpm in the vid at 2/3 throttle) The general rule with brushless is the higher the kv the smaller the prop/pitch and vice versa planes or boats (would also apply to brushed) If you have an in line amp meter/batt checker you can check the amps drawn in the water at full power (have someone hold the boat) and see if you are under max A for the motor. You can then prop to suit if necessary. This is the only way to check for correct load and is an absolute must for aeroplanes. After a run, motors should be around cool to almost too hot to touch (60-70deg C) There are backplate water cooling units available for using out-runners in boats if necessary eg pic.

H.M.S BRAVE BORDERER by nick Seaman   Posted: 4 months ago
A little anecdote to add to this build is that I was used to seeing both Swordsman and Boarderer in both Portsmouth and Portland whilst I was in the RN. (1960 "s} In fact we gave one of them a "lee" ie. got to windward of her in foul weather and helped her into Portland. She had some sort of mechanical problems. The stories one of them was moored on the smaller, walled wharf that they used away from the big one we on HMS Aurora used. As I said it was another rough night, most were in Portland . A yachtsman had crept during the night and tied up behind HMS Boarderer.( restricted area) Capt. told number one to go get the yachtsman to move his boat. Time was about 0400. Very tired yachty told no.1 to F off. No. 1 came back onboard and relaid to the skipper who went down reraised the yachty and got the same message! Skipper came back onboard and contacted the engine room and as it happened got a 'wet" start on the turbines. The loosely stowed sails on the yacht melted rather well!! Moral to the tale, Never tell a sailor to F off!! Bye the way both these boats had a top speed in good conditions , of in excess of 80 knots and in theory could circumnavigate uk in 12 hours. I remember that the always ran very flat on the water at planing speed. Regards, Nick.

Rebuild starts by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Evening Peter, I can confirm that the Shapeways 50 cal sets are very brittle, at 1/35 very filigree and fragile. I haven't built them yet, just trial fitted the carriages in the gun tubs, whereby I discovered that they are a tick smaller diameter than the tubs😲 So they are on the back burner until I have the hull and propulsion finished. Which will itself have to wait while I finish the hull renovation / conversion of my ancient Billing Boats fish cutter. Re: Airbrush: why the hell waste over a hundred quid buying another? Just buy a selection of needles and jets for the one you have. Mine came with a range from 0.3 to 0.8mm. Seem to remember remarking that 0.5 is too small for hull spraying! I'll only charge 50 quid for the advice and you've still saved 50!! 😁😁😁 Re next project: I reserve judgement, until I see one of the current projects afloat! 😉 Whatever, have fun with it, Cheers, Doug 😎

SLA Batteries! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Mornin' Ed, Veery interestink! These PNP ESCs from mTronik are relativley new. I have some mTronik Viper Marine 10A for my smaller 'brushed' boats and on first use I simply have to teach them which way on the throttle stick is forwards and which backwards. Looking at the so called manual for your PNP version I note instructions and notes as in attached pics. How you re-train it I can't see! Maybe just start again from switch on, but watch what you do with the throttle stick. Also seems it 'adjusts' as you use it. Quite what that means they don't explain🤔 Give 'em a ring and ask! I guess you reckoned; 'OK PNP so who needs to look at the manual'! Common mistook!🤔 What do you mean by "I then have to switch it to go forward." Switch what, where and how? And what effect did it have? Cheers, Doug 😎 BTW: what's that right next to the motor with cables trailing over the motor, and why can't I see any suppressor capacitors on the motor?

Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
I also enjoy restorations, Colin...just as much. Every challenge is different. This Chris Craft is a restoration of an Aerokits Sea Urchin that cost me all of 99p. on ebay! But then i thought it would be better made up as a single cockpit smaller runabout, hence the Chris Craft with the steeply tumblehomed stern. My son has an Aerokits PTB and my other son has a Sea Rover. I also have a Sea Urchin and a Veron Veronica yacht, so yes, I do like the restoration of old items. I have a pre War Marblehead in the loft too! I've never been interested in the big ships and service vessels. Only inshore sailing fishing boats and classic speedboats. If I can help you out with any info or techniques, let me know. I have a lot of books on woodies and years as a professional modelmaker to call upon. Cheers, Martin

LiPo batteries by MouldBuilder Admiral   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi Doug and all. Delay in answering your post as for some reason, my phone was useless on the internet. I did not see your post about checking the capacity percentage until I returned home, so that is why in April my checks were not complete. On my return to Hungary a couple of weeks ago, I checked the batteries and they were both at 3.85 volts per cell and at 51% capacity. When they were new, they were at 31% capacity. My new smaller batteries were also at 30% capacity and when I left on a storage charge, they are also at around 50%. The new, lighter 4S batteries are 1800mAh. On the first full charge they only gave me 89% capacity. I used them both, unfortunately they lasted about 6 minutes each, and recharged. This time they charged to 99% and lasted 10 minutes. Hopefully they get a little better after a few uses. I am now back in England and when I left, all of the batteries were at around 3.86 volts per cell an 50% capacity. I will check again at Christmas but I will have to see if the Danube freezes to see if I can use the boats then or not.😉

20th Scale ELCO 80ft PT boat part 7 by CB90 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi RNinMunich, Should not be too bad as will cut ply slit/profile from tubes to the transom then reinforce inside under rudder compartment. rest of the tubes length are already supported. I really wanted to make sure the motors and shafts were in excellent alinement, and being able to see through the hull is a good advantage. (note. do not have facilities to make alignment tools). In previous models I have left it towards the end of the build to fix motors couplings and have found alinement to be a bit difficult, especially on smaller boats.

H.M.S BRAVE BORDERER by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
Evenin' Rowen, So far so good, nice job👍 Let me go through your comments one by one😉 1) "Moved the battery towards the stern and, at speed, the forefoot lifts slightly clear of the water. The plane is now almost flat. The battery is not well positioned when near the bow." Battery in the bow is almost always bad news🤔 too much weight forward of the CoG or natural balance point when planing. 2) "The 2S battery used was a 4000mAh 30C; suspect this battery does not have the capacity to operate the model. Every motor will run up smoothly until a second one is operated. The first motor then “stutters” and a fuse might blow, this could be indicative of a power surge. Any comments from the electronic experts among the group would be appreciated." First the battery: you may be right. Especially with 3 x4500 kV motors Since you are using 3 ESCs how about feeding each one from a slightly smaller (lower weight) battery? Precondition of course is that all three are equally charged to the same voltage and capacity AND have the same (or very very similar) internal resistance! Complicates the issue of course and motors with a lower kV rating and one power source may well be the better solution😉 Second the 'stutter': How and when did you switch in the second motor? If the first was still at 'Full Ahead', i.e. 'Pedal to the metal!, I might expect the battery voltage to dip and then recover with the sudden additional load and a sharp rise in total current drawn. But no particular excuse for a sudden current rise in the first motor ! Where was the fuse that blew? I suspect in the primary supply lead from the single battery🤓 since with brushless motors you can't fit individual fuse in their supply leads like you can with a brushed motor. BUT you can to the ESCs feeding them!!! You can't get a power surge from a battery, not like a surge on the mains network due to lightning etc! But you can get a voltage dip and recovery if you suddenly present it with an additional load😲 3) "The 3S battery was 10,500mAh and 40C; with this battery all three motors can be run at full speed together and fuses do not blow. It was also very heavy at 1700g, holding the model down." All run up together to full speed or 'switched in' as described above? There's a big difference between a gradual increasing of load on a power source and a sudden step increase! 4) "The motors are 4500 kV. On refection, think a slower motor around, perhaps 2000 kV would have been a better choice." I did think at the outset that 3 x 4500kV was perhaps a little ambitious😲 2000 - 2500 sounds much better, and more controllable👍 Then you could also get good performance results with a single battery of capacity lower and weight 👍 The function of the third (centre) motor for 'action speed' would also be more pronounced👍 5) "Would concur with comments by others that a simple single or two bladed propeller layout for this model is probably best - that is unless you want to capture the true scale layout. The centre propeller seems to have little effect on overall performance, (see above re 4500kV motors- Doug😉) although it will power the model quite nicely when operating by itself. Have had several suggestions about how best to use the centre propeller. Will think about them and decide later how to do this when I start to finish the model." As a 'Scale Purist' (as far as my skills and tools allow!) personally I would frown on the use of 2 blade props, much less only a single prop. Do that in a fictitious power boat if you will, but for 'Brave Borderer' ? 😡 Do her justice please😉 Many three screw (😲) boats (including the full size originals of this era) only used the third motor for additional manoeuvring speed in action situations. My personal experience of FACs (Fast Attack Craft) and FPBs (Fast Patrol Boats) over the last three decades shows me that the three screw configuration has been largely dropped, especially since the introduction of much more powerful engines such as improved diesels and gas turbines. Many use a combination of diesel, for cruising, and gas turbine for 'action speed', so called CODAG, COmbined Diesel And Gas turbine. 6) "The 2 blade Hi – speed propellers both increased performance and current draw. The model is more than fast enough with the original scale layout." As I believe the 2 blade props were of larger diameter (and perhaps also of larger pitch) than the 3 bladers the higher current draw is a logical conclusion! Stick with the scale config! 👍👍👍 7) "Will purchase a lighter, 3 S battery as that seems the best choice for performance and weight." 👍 but don't overdo it to the other extreme by reducing weight and therefore capacity too much😲 You want a decent sailing time don't you? 8) "Testing using the bare hull with a minimum of detail worked well. For a models with a complex power train, this is a good approach as access to the internals can be gained easily. Nothing worse that finishing a boat carefully just to find the performance disappointing. Then having to to rip it apart to make major modifications or adjustments!" Heartily agree 👍👍👍 Bon chance mon ami😊

Help Needed new Builder Billings St Canute by Richard7 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 10 months ago
Yikes Frodo, I have just measured my plank lengths and indeed they are shorter than the hull approx. 90-100cm!! Considering two kits are identical this must be the intention of billing boats. Has anyone got and advice on this? I was thinking that it might be best to split the plank in half, glue the bow and stern ends first, then glue a plank section in the middle area? "We could do with some help here chaps". Another thing Frodo, do not try and fit the M500 motor I have!! (please see photos), stick with the M400 its smaller. As you can see in the photos my battery will not fit....GULP. Does anyone know if there is a smaller battery out there? The one I have is a 4405385 (Cornwall model boats P/N) 7.2V 3300 H. One other thing Frodo "DO NOT" fit the metal rudder post & item 16, if you do you will not get your inner prop shaft into the tube. The only way to do this would be to remove the motor. Probably best to leave the rudder & item 16 until you have fitted the motor & battery. Also I am finding the space in the hull is very limited for radio control, choose your equipment wisely. I am now thinking I must ditch the M500 motor for the M400 and then look at alternative battery size. After building the Boulogne-Etaples this St Canute kit is extremely challenging. Anyone out there with some suggestions would be a great help....kind of sinking here a bit (a few photos attached) Frodo if you have any further questions please let us know. Cheers Richard.

Too Powerful Brushless ? by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 months ago
Hi Graham If we are talking about the Graupner Brushless Speed ​​500 ECO no 7295 https://www.graupner.de/Brushless-Speed-500-ECO/7295/ then yes the Kv is 500 which equates to 7500 at 14.8v. It's 50mm x 80mm with a 6mm shaft so really a heavy duty motor and in a Aeronaut Queen 36" still much too big and powerful. You really need to resolve the drive train and shaft problems and this will be easier if you choose a motor of smaller diameter and power. A 36xx or very similar size motor at about 1000Kv or less (500Kv with 14.7v) will be ample. The prop should be less diameter than the motor. There are many examples of 36" model boats on this site and I do believe the majority of our members have used similar set ups, to those we have suggested, in their models with a large degree of success. It could be we are talking about a different motor as you refer to " the small outrunner motor". If so please post a link to a pic of the motor.