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>> Home > Tags > spray rails

spray rails
caprails
railway track,
toe rail
spray
spray can
spray paint
spray rails
Flytec HQ2011-1 by Mids-Phil Petty Officer   Posted: 10 days ago
[Score: 4/10] 18" Flytec HQ2011-1 Capable of 10mph and a runtime of 15mins Twin Propellors (2 Blade S Type) Geared Powered by NiMH (9.6v) 1Amp/h Batteries - Comments: I was feeling bored and saw this cheap Chinese toy boat advertised on t'internet. As I say it was cheap but it did have something of a passing resemblance to an Aquarama.... so I ordered one and when it arrived it really didn't look too bad. The down side was the radio gear was 27MHz and comprised just two forward and reverse switches to give forward, back and turn functions, but with no variable speed control. But then I wasn't expecting much anyway. So opening it up the innards were a doddle to remove and were replaced with a 2.4GHz receiver, esc, servo and rudder assembly. Thought about trying to fit water cooling but there really was no signifficant heat generated so it didn't seem worth it Photos seen elsewhere show the boat to plough pretty inelegantly through the water so spray rails and a couple of strakes were fitted to the hull to hopefully improve things in that regard. Anyway it's all back together now with everything working just fine, but I haven't had a chance to put it in the water yet (well it's been in the bath to make sure it floats but that's all) Looking forward to taking it out when the opportunity arises. In the meantime it's looking good on the shelf in the summerhouse and I am looking for the next project. I have to say that I have no illusions about my own abilities and I am totally in awe of the builds seen here. Nobody told me this would be addictive!

Sea Queen - strakes by BOATSHED Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
Have you got any pictures of these triangular spray rails?

Sea Queen - strakes by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
I found when fitting spray rails to use triangular stock like trailing edge section for aircraft wings. It looks neat and bends more easily than square stock.Fitted thin edge up the right angled face forming the deflecting face. Filled and sanded it blends well into the hull. Maybe not true scale but looks nice. It comes in many sizes and suppliers.SLEC is one for starters and Hobbies is another. Balsa Cabin another. Just loads if you use uncle Google.👍

Sea Queen - strakes by DodgyGeezer Commander   Posted: 15 days ago
The principle is simple. Fluid flowing over a surface tends to stick to it (Google Coanda Effect). It's worse at the low Reynolds numbers that models work at. The result is that water displaced by the boat at speed tends to flow up the sides of the hull, sticking to them, and can even pour onto the deck. This slows the boat down and can swamp it. If you have a sharp chine, you can force the water to move away from the hull at the discontinuity, because it can't easily flow around a sharp angle. Ideally, you can deflect it downwards and get some lift, helping the boat onto the plane. So a lot of models have small rails along the chine, shaped to deflect the water downwards a bit. This is what many of the Aerokits models have. Deep Vee design relies on these a lot - the bottom of the hull has a series of parallel spray rails so that as the boat rises in the water the spray is deflected downwards by each rail in turn and an ever-smaller part of the hull bottom is wetted - reducing drag a lot. But the Sea Queen is not a Deep Vee, and doesn't need more that the one set of rails along the chine. Deep Vee spray rails can also help to cushion the shock when a boat drops back into the water after leaving it - but that's more useful in full-size practice rather than models....

Tamure by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 5 months ago
This is a restoration of a launch I was given that was found in a rubbish bin on a farm here in Auckland It is an old RCM ? plan built 'Fairacre' and was pretty rotten when I received it as it is made in balsa and had been wet for quite a while. I stripped it down, re 'planked' large portions of the hull and fiber glassed it, re- built the cabin, re- marked the deck planks, fitted lights, curtains (ex Graupner Commodore bits from the 70s I had kept), stern ladder, cleats etc. It is fitted with a 540 brushed motor (originally had an old Graupner monoperm) and 70s Graupner ESC and Using 2.4 Radio gear. I still have a few things I'd like to do such as a re-wire, fitting chine spray rails, better motor and maybe some safety rails, but for now it does the job.

Chine Spray Rails by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
Hi William, First; it looks like the rail was not fitted according to plan🤔 However; my Sea Scout has no rails at all (Yet!) and as you have seen in your other thread on this topic she runs fine with the same profile rudder. BUT; I notice that your rudder extends well below the prop. Mine only to about half way down the lower blade and she's very responsive with no sign of digging in. Before messing up a nice hull I would trim the rudder back to at least the lowest extremity of the prop. Do another sea trial and if she still digs in a bit lop a bit more off, to about half way down the lower prop blade. 😲 Easier to mess with the rudder than with the hull 😉 Cheers, Doug 😎

Chine Spray Rails by Colin H. Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
Spray rails tend not stop heeling, on tight high speed turns they will dig in causing a heel, you could fit adjustable stabilisers on the lower transom like on racing boats. Cheers Colin.

Chine Spray Rails by Will-I-Am Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 6 months ago
I have a modav Huntsman 31, which heels over quite a lot on turns even after slowing down. I was looking at the chine spray rails at the rear of the boat (see picture) they do not dip below the outgoing angle of the hull as shown on the plan (see picture). Would a triangular fillet located under the existing chine strip to simulate the plan for a length along the hull from the transom improve the heeling over in turns?

Sea Queen - strakes by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Yep, all v hulls need spray rails and it makes your power requirements less for any case. Properly done it looks good,too. With the Sea Queen being a bit on the lardarse side it helps even more to get her "on the step" Martin

Sea Queen - strakes by AndyG009 Lieutenant   Posted: 7 months ago
Building a Sea Queen, what are peoples feelings about fitting spray rails ? I feel it needs them, but where ? This was ment to be about Spray Rails not Strakes (must be getting old........)

Fairey Hunsman renovation part 1 by CB90 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
I was lucky to be able to get myself a fibre glass hulled Fairey Huntsman 31 this is a model of the 31 ft Huntsman which converts to a scale of 1:11 which is a bit of a strange scale, the superstructure is in a poor state, so I am thinking it could now be changed to a 'Fairey Huntsman 28' which I think looks better. Huntsman 28 The model 34 in long is close to 1:10scale at 34.6in Some History Four Huntsman 28's took part and competed in the 1969 Daily Telegraph / B.P. Round Britain powerboat race. A Huntsman 28 'Fordspeed No 909' entered and completed the London - Monte Carlo race in 1972. Also the same boat set a new class speed record of 51.271 mph on Lake Windemere, in October 1973. The hull is a deep V with single chine and spray rails. The construction was of laminated mahogany, the hulls were cooked in an oven to cure the glue. The twin engines were placed mid ships. Dimensions LOA: 28' 10" (8.8m) LWL: ~24' 10" (~7.6m) Beam: 8' 9" (2.66m) Draught: 2' 6" (0.76m) Displacement: 8160lbs (3710kg)

Aerokits MTB, what is it?... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
BTW Martin; just looked at the video link you posted. That boat looks underpowered to me, or too much weight forward? Bow hardly comes outta the wet stuff, my little Sea Scout performs better than that 😁 Also seems to need the spray rails fitting. With all that splash the crew would have had a lotta fun arming the torpedoes 🤔😲 PS; I'm about to test run the first Taycol conversion board I made for you on my Taycol Target. More soon 👍

BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
Whilst waiting for the new motors and ESCs, reviewed videos of the vessel under power and noted that as the speed increases, the bow lifts towards a plane. However, as she gathers speed the transom flaps become effective, forcing the bow down in a cloud of spray. At this point the plane has been lost and the model becomes almost uncontrollable. Decided to temporarily ballast the hull to simulate the new motors and ESCs, then try to establish the optimum flap angle using just the centre propeller and shaft. This is the original 2838 brushless motor installation with a 30 mm propeller. With this simulated drivetrain it would also be an opportunity to determine the best battery locations for both 2 and 3S Li-Po batteries. Made up an angle template with a spirit level to get the correct deck inclination with the vessel floating at rest. From this located each type of battery statically - somewhere close to the mid-point of the hull. Which also seemed as good a place to start as any! Somewhere in the research for this model found a reference to the transom flap angle. This was at a 2 degree -ve (pointing downwards) angle. Installed the 2S battery and tried the model. The bow dug in at speed. Adjusted the flap to a straight and level position and tried again. The bow still wanted to dig in, but to a reduced extent. Readjusted the angle to 2 + ve and repeated. The bow now lifted so the forefoot just cleared the water and then remained in that position. Replaced the 2S battery with the 3S. The extra power obviously increased speed and the bow lifted slightly further. The spray was deflected by the chine rails and a level plane established. The conclusion is that the transom flap angle is critical to the correct planing of this model and that it should not be negative. Until the new motors and ESCs are fitted will leave the transom flap and battery locations as is. Once these components are installed, intend to repeat the test. Am confident that with some fine tuning the model can be now made to plane properly at a scale speed. Interesting to note that the model will just about plane with only one propeller operating – wonder what it will be like with all three?

Windows, stoopid question. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
Hi Guys, many thanks for the responses👍 So, in chronological order:- Mike: I did chamfer but probably not enough 🤔 Yes I know about the lead in side of the die 😉 and I know the one step forward half step back technique 👍 I bought this tap n die set recently, made by Toolcraft so not cheap rubbish, maybe expensive rubbish?🤔 3mm is the smallest in this set and the holder (with ratchet action🤔) is big an' clunky and weighs 340gm so not the easiest tool to keep level. Maybe good for a 1/2" Whitworth but not so super for a 3mm which is the smallest in this set. My 'Fine thread' set only goes to 2.5mm 🤔 As you can see from the pics the die is solid and there is only one locating screw so I can't open the die slightly as you say, and I remember from my car restoration days. Cutting oil I also have, mostly used on my two lathes, both Proxxon, one for the BIG stuff and one for the twiddly bits, pics 4 & 5. Have just used the littl'n to drill a 4mm brass bolt screwed into a 35mm prop so I can reduce the thread to 3mm for the shaft, pic 6. IF only I can get a decent thread onto the shaft 😲 I'll put the shaft back into the littl'n and turn a taper on the end as you advise. My Milling machine is only a teeny weeny one with no possibility of mounting the die on it, pic 7. It's very useful for pre-drilling precision holes in in spray rails an' such to take the 0.5mm pins for fixing. Just used it to pre-drill the new keel for the cutter. I have tail stocks for both lathes but no possibility to mount a die holder. Will investigate that pronto cos I'm gonna be faced with this snag again soon; 2 new shafts for my Graf Spee and 4 for my HMS Belfast. Might also look for a different die set😲 In the meantime I'll try improving the chamfer👍 Martin; as you can see from above I do have lathes, and a good selection of silver steel rod, so many thanks for your kind offer but now you've pointed the way I'll have a go at making my own punch. That piercing saw set looks good so I'll spring a few € for that 👍 You never know I might be able to use some shortened blades in my ancient Minicraft jig saw, for which you can no longer get spares 🤔 Your MB III looks great, and I can see why you were taken for that German musician - Doppelgange! Thanks for all the advice Gents 👍👍 G'night. Doug 😎 PS Just put me name down at Frau Schmutterputz's, but I'd more likely be found in the roses or perhaps petunias singing- "I'm a lonely little petunia in the onion patch ...." 🤓😲

Windows, stoopid question. by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
Doug, sorry, I should have answered you last time on that. A good impression of a dummy screw can be made in aluminium with a piece of tube sharpened on the end so it looks like a miniature leather punch. Obviously better if you can do it with something you've done in the lathe, in steel, but you don't have one. SO....PM me your postal and I will send you something I will knock up for you tomorrow in steel. That will last you into your dotage, when you will be found dribbling into the geraniums with this little tool in your mitts making impressions on the window cills of Frau Schmutterputz's Home for Englische Modelbauen. You will be able to "sharpen" it buy running it round on a stone lightly, rolling it as you draw it backwards. Can't add to Squire Turpin's words at all. I have a slide tailstock on my wee Taig lathe which makes screw forming easy as the thread takes the tap/die as it wants it, square and true. The piercing saw has clamps for much finer blades rather than the relatively big fret saw blades which generally have a pin at the ends. Sometimes you'll break a blade at one end. Then the adjustability makes sense as you just re work the length and re-use the broken blade. Tight wads like me appreciate such things. Car booked in tomorrow for repairs. About £300, so not as bad as I thought it might be. It's passed for the last two years. Busy boy today as I sprayed the Crash Tender grey on its upper works and by the looks of it it just needs a few areas of fine filler and a rub down on the toe rails and one more coat then it'll be ready for the gloss sides and the hull proper. Then I even used my brand new saw to mitre the corners of the topping to Chris's new garden pond casing. It's a stand up one to save our backs. So now, I am gonna sit and watch shite telly, even shiter than normal as it is all infested by ball kickers playing grown ups and failing miserably . G'night. Martin