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>> Home > Tags > steering servo

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happy hunter by spitfiresooty Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 7 days ago
the superconductor is coming on ok just using photos and adjusting the scale .I,ve used a snake for the steering as ther doen't seem to be enough room for a servo near to the rudders .I,ve found a small motor in my bits and fitted that to the bow thrusters.I,e had the radio connected to and everything seems to work ok so 'i've glued the deck in place .I need to put some strengtheners in the main cabin as it will need to support the mast assembly. I am stuggling to get the curved bits right for the bow and the front of the bridge but will get it right eventually

Bargain Tomkat by bilzin Lieutenant   Posted: 14 days ago
Somebody was either disillusioned with model boats or impecunious to the Nth degree because he let me have this BRAND NEW Ripmax Tomkat complete with Motor, ESC, brand new steering servo,action man driver,decals and instructions for a brownie with a bluey postage. Not my usual type of model but will make a fun change down at our 'postage stamp' lake (?)

Sidewinder by ronrees Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 1 month ago
[Score: 10/10] 16"/600g Sidewinder Capable of 10mph and a runtime of 40mins Single Propellor (2 Blade S Type 35mm) Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) 3Amp/h Batteries - Comments: Another of my Foam hulled, own designs using an own design Azipod thruster with B/L motor submerged and running in water. Steering by sail winch servo via geared pulleys, can rotate unit 360 degrees. Hope to put build write up in MB mag. Wierd model that turns in its own length and is powerful enough to clear the weeds on the pond (and break ice!)

Hobby Engine Richardson Upgrade by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Neville, toilet rolls, problem, especially if you have a cat!!!. 3 screws at the stern, 1 central 2 at the corners under bollards, leaver up with thin screwdriver. 1 each side of the rear deck hatch. 1 each side opposite the cabin rear hold down bollards screw fitted in inboard side of each one. 1 each side rear of the forward hatch. 1 each side forward hatch, again hidden by bollard screw from side. 3 in the bow area. PS all screws in the deck are under small plastic plugs, be gentle with them as you want to put them back to seal the deck again. You should have 14 screws now, the deck is sealed with a gasket, 'O' ring, and what seems like Vaseline, and splits at the rubbing strip just behind the tyre fenders, might need a bit of a pull, going round the hull as you go. Once the deck is off, it is all in front of you. Looking down into the hull, there is a black battery plate, held down with 4 screws, the receiver and the on/off switch. I have kept the plate, but cutaway the dividing 'walls' was needed, for the new receiver etc to fit. It is not big enough for the buggy type battery, so i glued a thin platform on top for the battery to sit on. Battery is held with self adhesive velcro pads to keep it in place. 'Central hull' is the motors and gearbox, follow the long Red and Black wires back to the receiver and cut them as close to the receiver as you can, ready to wire into the ESC, i used a 'chocolate' block, 10ah. Stearn is the servo and steering linkage, nothing needed here just a smear of grease to lubricate. A couple of drops of oil on the ends of the propshaft won't go amiss. 'Battery position', i have mine on the radio plate, but with care and a little trimming you can fit it across the hull, above the propshafts, or with care between the propshafts, fore and aft. Make sure there is a side plate fitted to stop the battery fouling the rudder servo. Hope this is clear, don't force the deck be gentle Mark

Stabilit Express by Midlife306 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
I think those doublers will need explosives to get them off... I've hit a bit of a roadblock with the big K7, I need to get Donald built up so I can position the steering wheel & dash correctly, the animatronic resin upper torso & arms I bought came with no instructions or info on what servos to use. I got some micro servos & they didn't fit, Dremel out & all fits now but I'm now struggling with connecting the servo arm to the rotating neck. I'll suss it out eventually but I need a rest. I've been doing bits on my 1/12 scale K7 in the background, if all goes well it should be ready for paint in a couple of weeks. As normal I've been waiting for parts to arrive from China, the brushless motor & esc arrived today for the blue rigger, I can make a start on that soon.. I've just finished printing the parts for the cabin for a Springer tug hull I got from Sonar & I've just started printing the first parts of a WW2 landing craft, its 1/16 scale nearly a metre long, I guess I'll be making a tank for it when it's completed. Then there's the Robbe Diabolo, on the instructions it says to use self tapping screws to hold the plastic dual rudders in place. No good to me as I've upgraded to dual aluminium rudders, these buggers need bolts! Trouble is the waterproof electronics box is used as a doubler for the central transom, when it's glued into place there isn't any room to access where the rudder bolts come through the doublers, ohhh the joy of problem solving.... So I'm keeping busy but my butter is spread a bit too thin. Cheers Wayne

Tug 'DHB Dauntless' by barnet Petty Officer   Posted: 1 year ago
Scratch Built 1:32 scale Dover Harbour Board Tug, DHB Doughty. The main hull is a standard Damen hull purchased from Mobile Marine Models, see their website for Portgarth. the hull is fitted with 2 x T12 Motors for the main propulsion,2 x 60 degree kort nozzles for steering, with 2 x purpose made brass props. Also fitted is a 12v Graupner water pump for the working fire monitor and Fwd spray bar, 2 x Mtronks 15 amp ESC's, Futaba steering servo and Futaba 40 MHz Receiver. Approx Dimensions including fendering Loa 41" Beam 14"

Vintage Model Works 46" RAF Crash Tender by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 year ago
Here's the history bit so pay attention... Many years ago as a boy in the fifth year of my north London secondary school, circa 1971, our woodwork class was given the option to make something of our own choice. Having mastered the majority of joints, wood turning, finishing techniques and the making of table lamps, stools and bookshelves etc. this seemed a good idea, so myself and a fellow classmate and model making chum asked if we could construct a model boat. The teacher, on hearing that it was to be from a kit and not from scratch was a little surprised but agreed. So my friend and I jointly invested about 20 quid in an Aerokits 34.5 inch RAF Crash Tender from Blunts' model shop in Mill Hill (long since gone like many others) and we set about construction during lesson time and sometimes at break times. I recall we used "Cascamite" to glue it all together on the advice of the woodwork teacher because neither 'Scotch' glue nor PVA was suited to marine construction. Good progress was made over the course of our last year at school but it was never fully completed, only requiring painting, running gear and detailing. My friend decided that he needed to withdraw from the project as he was enrolling in a college away from home to study for a career in the merchant navy and I agreed to buy out his share and continue with the project. And so it was that I carried on with the painting and installing the running gear which consisted of a 1.5 cc marine diesel engine, water pickup, prop shaft and rudder and a MacGregor radio system with a stick for steering and a single button for speed control. The engine and radio came from Michael's Models in Finchley (also long gone) for £20 as my elder brother, who had started a Saturday job there, was able to get a staff discount for me. The diesel engine was noisy and smelly and a pig to start with a leather thong around the flywheel and I decided to abandon this means of propulsion (I foolishly ran it for slightly too long 'dry' and melted the soldering around the brass water jacket!). By now I had graduated from my part time job in Woolies to an engineering apprentice with Post Office Telephones and my new income of 20 quid per week could support my modelling and electronics hobbies after my contribution to the household for my keep. So off to the model shop to buy a Taycol Supermarine electric motor, two 12v volt lead acid batteries and a suitable charger. The diesel came out and was sold on Exchange & Mart and the mount and coupling re-made to accommodate the new Taycol motor. What an improvement that was! I can't remember now what speed controller or servo I used but whatever it was did the job, and it went like the clappers on Friary Park boating lake (also long since gone) even though the radio control system was a bit crude with the non-proportional steering and 'blip' throttle control. The boating took a back seat when I acquired my driving licence and my first car (a rusty old Cortina Mk 1) and I also got involved in sound recording for radio. I decided to sell the boat and bits for £60 through Exchange & Mart and bought an Akai 4000DS tape recorder and a 'Chilton' audio mixer, built a home studio and along with a good mate of mine started making radio commercials for the new commercial radio stations including London's Capital Radio. We even won a 'Campaign' advertising award for one of our efforts! And so after several years as a 'phone engineer I moved into professional recording for A/V and broadcast and then into TV production. Fast forward to today. Semi-retired with grand kids and with more free time on my hands I still had an interest in model making so In Jan 2016 went to the Model Engineer exhibition at nearby 'Ally Pally'. It was there that I saw an RAF crash tender just like the one I built all those years ago and got into conversation with the chap on the stand. This re-ignited my model making interests and I researched the hobby and that model in particular.

Aerokits Sea Urchin Sea Nymph by jonbliss152 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 year ago
Hi Harleydream1, I like what you have done with the Sea Urchin, its hard to see in the image but are you operating the tiller steering with lines run forward to a servo? Many thanks Jon

Sailing a straight line by Trillium Captain   Posted: 2 years ago
I appreciate all the good ideas and suggestions. I'm going to work through the list in an order which I think will be easiest and/or most effective. Starting off with increasing the rudder size by mechanically attaching something grossly oversize. If that works, I'll reduce the size step by step to find out what's the minimum size that makes sense. The rudders at present are oversize compared to the plan of the original. One of my early fixes attempted was to attach a 1" deep brass plate about 20" long under the bottom centreline of the hull as an external keel. I considered that would make a big improvement, but it made no difference. Steering control has a servo rotating a toothed pulley. The toothed drive belt goes around it and the two rudder pulleys. The toothed belt ensures the rudders move and stay synchronized. Roy

Poor run time by randhbarker Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 years ago
I have the Sea Queen which has a Jp C50-20 brushless motor. I use a 12v lead acid battery as power supply. The battery powers the motor and the steering servo. My issue is that when fully charged the boat gets up goes very well,however after about 10 mins I can have the throttle stick wide open and it's hardly moving. When I use my % tester on the battery afterwards it tells me I have 60% left. If that's the case way won't it go. Seems a false economy to charge a battery for hours for so little run time. Should I change to a different power supply or am I doing something wrong.

236674 by Haverlock Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 years ago
ok here we go you will need a mixer a v tail mixer should do the job http://www.mtroniks.net/prod/RC-Accessories/VTail.htm that's waterproof! you will also need to use a "Y" lead so you can take a rudder feed to your rudder servo. That way your motors should give steering in addition to the rudder. A bow thruster would be on its own channel. NB. if you have 2 LIPOs and intend to run each motor from its own LIPO you HAVE to have a connection between the negatives from each battery so the negative rail is common. The feed from the ESCs to the mixer should solve that for you. If your ESCs give BEC you need to remove the positive "servo wire" from one of the ESC or you may fry your receiver.

Servo current draw. by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 years ago
HI Steve I can't find the cem040 drive via google but U -tube produced https://youtu.be/qDYKT4M8eUY. The steering is continuous on this design but other units suggest 90deg servos scaled up to 180deg. In this case they will need to be metal gear and high tork. I would suggest speaking to some one at Servo Shop in Frodsham as they stock many servos and should be able to offer you advice on the correct servo. Sorry the ( ) plus sign was omitted from my last post and does refer to positive dave

Servo current draw. by Stour-boy Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 years ago
Thanks for that Haverlock,what a can of worms,there are at least 2500 different types so where do you start when deciding which ones to use ? Going back to the feeds for the servo it looks like the three wires are pos,neg and what I call a trigger wire,so as long as they come from the same power source that's fine ? I am building a harbour tug with azimuth schottel drives with 180 degree steering and using astern for the other 180 If that makes sense both drives independent of each other. Is there a gyroscopic reaction that would make it necessary to use heavier servos ?

'Westbourne' PLA Tug by ads90 Commander   Posted: 2 years ago
[Score: 9/10] 27"/2000g 'Westbourne' PLA Tug Single Propellor (3 Blade 35mm) Geared to a MFA (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (7.2v) 4Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Viper 15 Marine (15Amps) ESC - Comments: Westbourne is a Port of London Authority steam Tug from the Caldercraft Mini-Fleet Range - it is 1:48 scale. This model was discontinued a few years ago but I did manage to purchase a brand new boxed one via ebay a couple of years ago. It has taken me about 18 month to complete but only working off and on for some time until recently when I decided I needed to get a move on with it. The hull has limited access for the RC, batteries, steering servo and motor but I have managed to fit it in neatly with access to all parts, I have fitted batteries on both sides amidships in the hull acting as both ballast and stability. I have now run my tug on our club pond and she sits perfectly on the water and no other ballast required. I originally installed a geared motor at 2.5:1 and I thought that the tug was sailing a little faster than I wanted so I changed to my 6:1 setup but the speed and control was poor, so I went back to my original set up. On the whole I am very pleased at how she has turned out. Now started on my Northlight Clyde Puffer.

Sea Queen by Haverlock Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 years ago
12v so ok there 2200mAh that's fine. Duration ( takes a deep breath) it depends upon your prop and how free your shaft etc. is. Max efficiency is at 8A so 22/8= 2.75 hours. HOWEVER your not going to get that!!! You lose some current to the esc. and if you have a bec. to your receiver and steering servo. Added to this is the fact that the battery voltage will fall so speed will reduce. figure 30 min to 1 hour.