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>> Home > Tags > stern esc

stern esc
ernest frank
jules verne
stern
stern cover
stern esc
Internal wiring & bottom skins by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Because I am keen to conceal as much of the wiring as possible I have decided to place the battery at the bow and the operational equipment at the stern, the engine on the original boat was central and covered with a soundproof box and this is convenient as the motor can be positioned and concealed in the same way. This means that some of the wires will have to run the full length of the boat and the easiest way to conceal them is to run them beneath the ‘box’ around which the hull is formed, and this needs to be done before the bottom skins are fitted. Holes were bored through the bulkhead formers under the port side of the hull and battery cables were run to the stern where the ESC will be and three motor wires from the ESC run to the centre, emerging near the motor position. For good measure I put in a servo cable and a separate draw wire just in case I needed to put more cabling in for any additional features, perhaps working navigation lights? Satisfied that I had all the cabling in place I was able to fit the bottom skins starting with the starboard side first. Before doing so I put a very slight 'hollow' in former F1 which should help blend the shape of the the hull where the ply skins meet the balsa blocks that will to be carved and shaped to form the bow. This can be seen in the last picture. The process of forming and fixing the skins is the same as for the side skins but in addition to the pins holding the skins in place I used some brown polythene ‘packing tape’ to pull the skins tightly against the bulkhead formers and strakes. The packing tape has a very high tensile strength and is ideal for this, and of course cheap and easy to remove. Once the aliphatic glue had set thoroughly overnight I removed the excess from the skins with a small block plane and finished them with my sanding plate. Before I fit the skin at the stern I will have to arrange the water cooling for the ESC, with the pickup just behind the prop and the outlet on the stern. I’ll cover that aspect in the next update.

50a esc from Hong Kong by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 years ago
Hi Sorry to hear that. Graupner's 900 bb motor Is rated at 6v to 40V 1.1amp no load to 8amp at max efficiency. The stall current Is 54 amps. It would appear from this that a 50amp speed controller should suffice (I would suggest a 40/50 amp fuse however, In case of a siezed/locked prop). However everything would need to be free running (ie no misaligned motor to shaft drive) and no tight spots on the prop shaft or thrust bearings. Were you running completely dry, some bearings require water to lubricate. I am not sure of the maximum voltage on your ESC but If It Is 12v then a fully charged SLA would exceed this. Recent experience at our club site suggests that many of the far eastern esc's do not take kindly to any over voltage. I believe the problem lies with the output wires being soldered too close together on the unit, causing a short when overheating, and yes lots of smoke and heat. Dave