Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
January 2019: 12 people
December 2018: 6 people
November 2018: 11 people
October 2018: 9 people
September 2018: 13 people
August 2018: 5 people
July 2018: 8 people
June 2018: 8 people
May 2018: 7 people
April 2018: 21 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (19)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > styrene

styrene
polystyrene
styrene
LED Nav. Lighting by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 6 days ago
Two days ago I put what I hope is the final paint on the hull, hatch and misc. parts. I like to let it sit for several days to cure, especially in cooler weather. I took the time to work out LED navigational lighting for my Brooklyn Tug and got that installed. I will photograph that tug later. Back to the springer tug, I had difficulty finding a good mounting spot for the starboard and port lighting so I decided to raise it on a light bar. Photos show the styrene structure in progress which will have the green and red side lights and a single white light on the top center post. Worked out the resistor values to reduce current and work off of my 6 volt supply, then soldered as shown. Fed the assembled LEDs through the plastic rectangular tunnel I created. The one photo I took with the red LED turned on is so bright that the camera just picked up a bright spot. I may have to reduce brightness but will test out in daylight first.... These LEDs are very bright and are 360 degree view! Ordered from "superbrigntleds.com" in order to get the full 360 as the ones at the local store were very limited to 18 to 60 degrees. Ordered red, green and white and they arrivedin about four days, great service. I have used this company several times and am happy with them, good to know. More to come, Joe

Ships-Ladder by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 10 days ago
Back at it this afternoon, handrails are very solid after overnight cure. Trimmed the rail ends to the necessary length. Glued in place. Built a ships ladder, first time for this, think it will work. Need to get ships ladder set to finalize railing. Ladder railing is seen in photo, I make bends like on this by applying heat and bending with my fingers. Styrene gets very flexible with heat, but can quickly melt if not careful. I learned not to use my heat gun (used for shrink tubing in my electronics) as it quickly gets out of control. I usually boil water, let it sit and dip the plastic in and out. Easy way to control bends. Joe

Railings by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 10 days ago
Boatshed, I see you are in the UK, I'm glad to see they sell this styrene there. Good stuff, it takes a while to get a good collection, you must have been at it for a while too. What are you building with styrene? Cheers, Joe

Styrene source by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
Hi Joe, Thanks, for sharing! It's a good website to know of! Regards, Ed Hi Boatshed, I'm going to order too, It comes in handy!

Styrene source by BOATSHED Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
I also have a pile of packets of the same stuff like that.

Styrene source by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 11 days ago
Ed, I get my styrene at a local train model shop, all of the other hobby shops closed down. It is from Evergreen Scale Models and they do sell on-line as well. Evergreenscalemodels.com I buy both the shapes and sheet styrene and I cut all my materials with single edge razor blades as a, sharp blade is always good. Buy bulk packages and go thru a couple a day. See photos

Railings by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 11 days ago
Last night I had done a quick railing mockup as seen in the first three photos. Decided to go with styrene and use a rectangular stanchions (verticals) and top handrail along with horizontal round intermediates. Drilled holes through the verticals and inserted the round rods, then glued. Worked pretty well. Next few shots show how I typically sketch up to scale and determine proper spacers, dividers come in handy for this. Then drew some guide lines for assembly, taped it to my tack surface, covered in wax paper and pinned the assemble in place. Pins do not penetrate anything,just uses pressure to secure. Some drops of styrene cement and the parts are welded together. Then on to all the railings needed. Will let dry overnight and trim ends in place. FYI -- Tack surface is just a piece of acoutical ceiling tile, I cut down the 2'x4' size to make smaller ones for my tiny workbench use. I learned this pinning method from building balsa airplanes, comes in handy a lot...... Joe

Pilot House Structure by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 13 days ago
Hello, I was not happy with the pilot house and substructure location toward the rear of the tug, that was when I was considering a tug ferry. Repositioned now to the more traditional tug front location. Cut up the old structure and am reworking it. Photos show the progress from last night and today, very time consuming, but I enjoy working with styrene. Lost some time fooling around with some LED nav lighting, but I did not have all of the required sizes and colors, maybe later after sea-trials. Hopefully I will wrap up the details in the next week and get on to final paint. Inside mechanical and electronics are complete. More tomorrow. Regards, Joe

Hatch & Tow Bitts by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 21 days ago
Last night I started on the large hatch that will cover the entire deck opening rather than several hatches, this is to keep with simple approach. The pilot house and whatever else I decide to add will be attached to this for easy removal and access for battery charging and maintenance. It's not as easy as a flat deck hatch as I curved the deck and wanted to curve the hatch as well. See photos, I cut curved sides, then I clamped it to blocks on the bench to bend , glued and let dry for 24 hours. While that's setting up I started on building some tow bitts. These I am making from styrene that I had from my railroad scratch building. See two small for aft and 1 larger at the bow that is in progress. In addition, I showed some shots of my Brooklyn Tug Bitts. These are heavy duty and were made of brass! Still enjoying this simple build..... Joe

Deck, servo mount by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 23 days ago
Put together a pilot house based on some tugs I've seen. Just freelanced it as I went. I build a lot with styrene so I am used to just cutting and building. I use liquid styrene cement that fuses the materials together. See photo, will trim it out as I mount it, need to add some detail at roof and some Navigational lighting. Put on on 3mm plywood deck, same as hull bottom. The deck is also curved (proper term is SHEAR) and I started to build up some wood edge at the opening. Will sand everything well, then start sealing and priming all surfaces. Made a bracket for the rudder servo mount and an adjacent platform for the ESC and RX. Ordered two 6v 5ah SLA batteries. I will wire in parallel to stay with 6v and get 10ah. I like to stay with 6 volts as I want the motor to run slow like a tug should. Will wire in an in-line fuse. Haven't decided where I will put switch, up high somewhere to avoid water. I will show the wiring once I get to it. This build is going fast because it's a simple design, just what I was looking for. I work on it late afternoons and into the evening while I watch basketball games. About 4 hrs a day. Looking forward to building the hatch and getting some primer started tomorrow. Regards, Joe 👍

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
After completing the cowl, turned to the rear structure covering the gas turbine and other engine spaces. This can readily be made from styrene sheet. The sides and top were cut out, reinforced with “L” shaped angle and fitted together with CA glue. No particular challenges, other than determining where the various section transitions occur. Luckily had two different sets of plans to compare, so the nuances could be established. It was not until the rear structure was fitted into the cowl, the assembly fitted to the removable deck and placed on the hull, realized just how important this milestone was. Once everything is firmly located the accuracy of build becomes readily apparent. Any inaccuracies show up as an obvious misalignment. Was able to check the alignments and squareness using eye, rules, squares and a spirit level and was pleased with the outcome. A subtle sanding of about .020” off the base of one side of the superstructure and everything became square, parallel and correctly aligned. Quite a relief! Have always stressed the importance of accuracy throughout a build. This supported that recommendation. Once the superstructure was completed realized my plan to lift the deck off to gain access to the electrical control switches was impractical. Have thus cut a small access hole in the rear deck to facilitate access. Still undecided how to best disguise the hole, but at least access is now relatively easy. From now on, until the test program can be continued on the water, will add detail to the model. Doubt there will be much to describe is that of interest, or that has not been covered by others. Will continue this blog once there is anything significant to report. In the meantime, best wishes for Christmas and 2019,

Sanding done by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Shucks! Mine are all red 😭 BUT; just found some 1 and 2mm white styrene tooob in the stash 😊 Guess they'll do for my T45, Belfast and Illustrious. Thanks for the prompt Steve1 Cheers, Doug 😎

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Back to the build. Next milestone, to complete the superstructure and engine covers. The superstructure is essentially a cowl that supports the open bridge and serves as the air intake for the gas turbines. The engine covers fit into the rear of it. The superstructure is full of curves and will be interesting to make. Still trying to save weight, decided to make it out of glassfibre. Rather than first make a plug then a female mould and finally the cowl, wanted to try the technique of making a plug out of styrene foam sheet, then covering it in a glass fibre matt. Once the glass fibre is set, the foam is dissolved out using a solvent and the cowl remains – Inshallah! To ensure the foam did not react to the glass fibre resin, painted the finished cowl with enamel paint before sticking the matt down. See pictures. What a mess! The resin had crept under the paint and into the foam dissolving it. When the resin dried the plug had shrunk slightly and had the surface finish of a quarry. First thought was to hurl it and start again, this time in wood. On second thoughts, wondered if the plug could still be used. Decided to build it up with wood filler and from it make a female mould, as originally intended. The cowl would then be made from the mould. Built the damaged plug up and sanded it smooth. As the plug would be covered in fibreglass, the surface finish was not critical. Brushed a coat of fibreglass on the plug and, after drying filled any defects with glaze putty and sanded smooth. Once the finish and dimensions were satisfactory, applied a thicker coat of glass fibre to the plug. This was again smoothed down, waxed with carnauba polish and then covered in mould release. From it the cowl was made. Picture shows plug, mould and cowl placed side by each. The cowl requires reinforcement; the fittings and various mountings then adding before installing. A trial installation showed that it fitted properly the deck and was accurate. A lesson for the next time is to make the plug and mould much deeper than the finished item. That will allow any rough edges, on either the mould or the component, to be trimmed off leaving a smooth fibreglass edge.

All hooked up, nowt happens... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Here's a pic of the set-up, with the ESC central. Rx is in a little styrene box I made for it. Shows the motor too on its mount. Martin And yes I got the heat shrink on the battery leads the wrong way round, but had so much trouble soldering the bloody wires to that stupid t shaped plug I couldn't be arsed to change em over!

Skimmer by solo1274 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 18" Skimmer Capable of 12mph and a runtime of 30mins Single Propellor Direct Drive Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) 11Amp/h Batteries - Comments: built from styrene. Used some online plans as a guideline.