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>> Home > Tags > styrene

styrene
polystyrene
styrene
Club Racer, One class by ronrees Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 8 days ago
[Score: 10/10] 18"/500g Club Racer, One class Capable of 15mph and a runtime of 30mins Single Propellor (2 Blade X Type 30mm) Direct Drive to a 2820 x 1100kv (2 Blade X Type) Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Turnigy w/p. 30 amp (5Amps) ESC - Comments: This is based on a Fairey Swordsman and is another of my own designs but made in Vac Formed Styrene for which the vac former was home-made as well. The model is designed specifically for youngsters and club members who want to race together. The boat only has 5 parts!! Top, bottom, rudder and servo cast assembly ( Polyester resin) and motor, prop shaft assembly also Polyester resin. A wooden frame that forms the seal and holds hull in shape. The whole top comes off. Its scarey fast and very tough (2mm styrene) and was made for under £25. Hoping build article will also go into MB magazine sometime.

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Before the funnel could be installed wanted to fit a working radar scanner, navigation lights and the batteries. Decided to use sub C NIMH batteries in plastic holders, they should have the target endurance and provide some ballast. Fitted two sets of 4 cells, one at the forward end of the superstructure and the other at the rear, both at keel level. These were inserted into wooden battery trays to hold them in place. A dry test run showed a full speed motor run time well exceeding the hour target, so will try on water. Also took the opportunity to fit the Rx and then adjust the rudder before finishing off the wiring. Both the navigation lights (LEDs) and the radar scanner work. The radar is driven by a servo with the potentiometer removed and a magnetic drive shaft run up through the superstructure from below the deck. The motor requires about 9 volts to run at what would seem to be something approximating to scale speed; fitted a voltage reducer to allow the lights and the radar to work on less than 6 volts. The mast lights are to be installed in a separate circuit after the masts are added. As I get more into the detail it is evident the GA drawing and the photographs of the vessel in service differ. Fortunately the component locations seem consistent, although the equipment is not. This most apparent in the hold ventilators. The GA shows the standard cowl vents, but the photographs show a mixture between an vertically squeezed oval vent (which am advised is more typically German) and ventilator columns with cylindrical caps. The column style vents with cylindrical caps were easily made from two different sizes of styrene tube with the cap tops made from styrene offcuts. The squeezed oval style vents were more difficult. Broke them down into the major parts of the cylindrical vertical tube and, from a larger tube cut a small ring and filed one end to straddle the tube once it had been squeezed oval. Glued it into place whilst restrained in a small hand vice. Once set, removed and sanded the the two to give a smooth transition, closing the rear aperture off with styrene offcuts. Then resorted to wood filler, filed down to give a smooth, oval vent.

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Have moved on to the deck furniture and equipment, including the funnel. Most of it can be made from the usual assortment of scrap materials and odd and ends. Decided to start on the funnel. Planned to make up a wooden replica and wrap a thin styrene sheet around it, finally inserting styrene formers into the shell, gluing them into place. Made the replica up from scrap wood blocks and shaped it into the correct shape. The outcome looked so good was tempted to use as final as making funnels seems quite a challenge. Anyway proceeded to plan and shape thin styrene sheet around the replica, using a heat gun to overcome the memory. Once this was done, fitted shaped styrene internal formers to hold the styrene to the correct shape and glued with adhesive. After the styrene glue had dried and the excess material trimmed, now had two usable funnels - wood and styrene. The wood version is nominally smaller and fits slightly better, so decided to use it. The Teakwood was originally operated by the J I Jacobs Company, which had a buff funnel with a black cap as markings. Stumbled across a picture of the vessel when she was chartered to the British India Steam Navigation Co. Evidently BI usually painted chartered vessels in their livery. Although the picture does not show the traditional and attractive BISNCo white hull cheat line, it does show the funnel markings. These are black with two narrowly separated white bands. Rather preferred this scheme so adopted it. The picture was taken in the mid 1960s and it also shows a pristine looking ship, my worries about the model looking unsoiled seem groundless. One of the pictures shows a strip that extends back from the wheelhouse almost to the funnel - this is a support for the awnings that fit over the bridge wings.

M.V. TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
The wheelhouse was made out of styrene sheet, suitably shaped and heated to get the correct contours. It was left loose as, until the funnel is made, in some doubt about the shape and size of the cut-out needed in the navigation deck. The structure is essentially complete; glazed and painted. Until the funnel research is finished have now moved on to other items. Started making the hatch covers to establish interior hull access and to confirm the best battery that can be inserted through them. Not made a final decision on the battery size or type yet. Hatch access is limited, so gell cells are out. Vacillating between Ni-Mh and Li-Po, but have had better experience with Li-Po. The hatches are the McGregor folding type, but the GA has few details of them. Fortunately my SD 14 plans have full dimensions so copied those. On the SD 14 made the hatch coamings (sides) as males and fitted them through apertures in the deck. On Teakwood decided to build up a small wood coaming around the hatch aperture and then have the hatch coamings fit, slightly loosely (female) over them. This is a much better approach. All the coamings can now be made from the same strip so the hatches immediately stand equally above the deck. Also, shims can be inserted into the hatch coamings so the alignment can be adjusted to get them to line up accurately. It will be a better way to keep water out, although cannot see that ever being much of an issue. Added the accommodation ladder recesses in the bulwarks. In future, must remember to add them before the hull is finished as repairing damage should not be needed with better planning. Happy Christmas and Best Wishes for 2018

MV TEAKWOOD by Trillium Captain   Posted: 1 month ago
It's looking really good. The superstructure front looks like the most difficult part of the whole model. What thickness of styrene did you use? Roy

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Having corrected the bow problem, returned to the superstructure. The original plan was to try to reproduce the whole of the superstructure, right back to the rear of # 5 hold in one continuous piece of styrene. It would be cut and then filed out to fit the front panel right through to the rear on both sides. This would avoid any joints and discontinuities and it was hoped would capture the flowing lines more accurately. Measured and found the piece would be over 42'' long! Decided this would be difficult to cut accurately and would probably never fit. Gave up on the idea and made the piece up in three sections; the front and both sides. The sides would be from an assembly of styrene strips and various precut shapes, the front from one styrene piece. After making several measurements and then templates, made a complete front panel from a cereal packet and from it cut the proposed panel out. Left the solid areas oversize so could file and sand to the correct size and shape. Once was reasonably confident the panel would fit, heated and bent the corners around a steel rod to get the correct radius. Throughout this kept offering the panel up into place making sure the radius and dimensional adjustments were satisfactory. Finally glued it into place. Once glued in place, cut the lower edges to follow the hull bulwark contour. Used a similar technique for the sides and finally glued them into place and together. Sanded to remove traces of adhesive. Fitted LED navigation and wheelhouse lights, but left the wheelhouse structure off as the funnel size and shape will determine the navigation deck cut-out. This will be added after the funnel has been researched and made.

M. V. TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Finished the major parts of the hull and am satisfied with the results. Now turned to the superstructure, which has turned into a challenge in its own right. Decided to break the structure down into decks and concentrate on each deck individually; before “rolling them up” into the complete structure. Also decided to make the central “core” first and complete, before adding the curved frontispiece containing the forward bulwarks. This would allow all the detail between the two such as windows, doors and portholes to be accurately made and positioned. The structure from the first deck upwards was made removable to gain access to the internal systems of this working model. The lovely flowing curves, which attracted me to the vessel initially, proved a pain to reproduce. The bends around the front corners required making each deck front separately and then gently bending heated styrene around a former to reproduce. There is much opportunity for hurling! Added a L shaped strip around the front of each deck, so there is something firm to glue the front bulwarks to. Was concerned that without something like that the individual deck shields would never line up properly. Similarly added styrene U channel along the deck edges to give a surface to which the shield side rails could be fitted. This also replicates the vertical deck edge panels that are evident in pictures. Felt this would also make the structure more robust, enabling it to be removed and refitted without damage.

M.V. TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Started to add the finishing touches to the hull; portholes, a bulwark capping strip and bilge keels. The portholes were drilled to the outside diameter on the drawing and small sections of styrene tube epoxied in. These were then drilled out and smoothed to the hull contour. Once the hull is painted lenses will be added usimg clear epoxy. The bulwark capping strip is a small styrene “U” section CA glued along the top of the bulwarks. This tidies up the edge and gives a smooth, consistent appearance. Have never been satisfied with previous attempts at bilge keels. Tried making them from both styrene and wood, pinned and epoxied into place. Not very robust, although they looked fine. Plenty of scope for repairs! Decided to try another approach on this model. Purchased strips of 1/4” L shaped styrene and CA glued them into position on the underside of the hull, with the leg facing in towards the keel. Filled the gaps on both sides of the styrene with fibre-glass resin and then rubbed them down, feathering the edges of the bilge keel into the hull. These bilge keels are nice and strong and, from the outside, the bodge is not visible. It can been just seen from the underside if the model ever gets inverted. Hope that is unlikely though! From here on the construction will follow well established principles, so will only write bog updates as significant milestones are achieved.

80' Elco PT Boat by Zdenek Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 7/10] 30"/1600g 80' Elco PT Boat Single Propellor (2 Blade X Type 40mm) Direct Drive to a Turnigy Typhoon 500 Heli (2 Blade X Type) Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) 5Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Turnigy Marine 60 Amp (60Amps) ESC - Comments: A scratch-built stand-off model based on Model Boats free plan (design by GG). Material mainly balsa wood (hull) and plastic (styrene) on superstructure. Propulsion unit differs from the original design. This is a second set up, not really tested yet. Original set up was Speed 700 Turbo, 12 V NiMh battery pack 4100 mAh, it was 500 g overweight. The only "special feature" are working position lights. It was a pleasure to built and it is pleasure to sail her.

CHIEF by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 22"/1400g CHIEF Capable of 5mph and a runtime of 45mins Twin Propellors (3 Blade 45mm) Direct Drive to a 540 (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (8.4v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through HOBBYWING (10Amps) ESC - Comments: VAC-U-BOAT TW200 H.I.P.S. (HIGH IMPACT POLYSTYRENE); KIT CAME COMPLETE WITH ALL RUNNING HARDWARE AND ASSEMBLY COMPONENTS. GREAT KIT FOR BEGINNERS OR YOUNG MODELLERS. COMPLETED IN ABOUT A WEEK OR SO. 1:48 SCALE CONTROLLED BY FLYSKY 4CH XMIT/RCVR. THE FIRST R/C VESSEL IN THE "ILLINIWEK MARINE" FLEET. FEATURES FLANKING RUDDERS, WORKING RADAR ARRAY AND 9V LED NAV LIGHTS AND AMBER STANDING/DECK ILLUMINATION. BTW, THAT'S A DUMAS 1:48 RAKE BOW & BOX BARGE ON HER BOW.

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
There was considerable sanding required around the bow. Once complete, decided to continue and remove all the hull detail not appropriate to the Teakwood. Used an orbital sander for this and it turned out nicely. The detail seems to only be in the gell coat and the actual glass – fibre core was untouched. Suggest do this outside and wear a mask as it creates a lot of dust. Had originally thought of covering the bow with light glass – fibre cloth and stippling it down with resin. After looking at the bow area decided that a coat of glass – fibre resin, applied to the new portion and extending an inch or so into the original hull would be adequate. The wood filler / styrene / steel wire structure is quite rigid and robust. This has turned out nicely and the bow area is now complete. Retained the anchor hawse pipe detail as, much to my surprise, it is in the correct location for the Teakwood. Inspected the hull shell from all angles (this usually any reveals errors or inconsistencies), pertinent dimensions were also checked with a steel rule, protractor and a spirit level. Found nothing amiss. Whilst cannot be absolutely positive the bow entry lines are correct (do not have a lines plan), checked them against a number of similar vessels. These range from the Liberty, through SD 14 to the “City of Toronto” - which is of a similar vintage. They look quite close. Have now completed the major transformation of the Velarde hull into the Teakwood and can move onto the remainder of the build.

Palaform Griffon 600 RNLI by ModelHover Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
A 600mm long model hovercraft built from a kit using Depron polysyrene. Excellent kits and extremely light, quick on the water and very quick on polished surfaces such as sports halls. Contact Palaform for further info. Just Google them. Use styrofoam paint to decorate otherwise you risk melting the polystyrene.

Palaform Griffon 600 - Police by ModelHover Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
A 600mm long model hovercraft built from a kit using Depron polysyrene. Excellent kits and extremely light, quick on the water and very quick on polished surfaces such as sports halls. Contact Palaform for further info. Just Google them. Use styrofoam paint to decorate otherwise you risk melting the polystyrene. Reflective marking from local police - thanks guys!

Palaform Griffon 600 by ModelHover Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 10/10] 24" Palaform Griffon 600 Direct Drive to a Brushless Powered by LiPoly (11.1v) Batteries Controlled Through Unknown ESC - Comments: Built from a kit by Palaform in Wellingborough. Made from Depron, a compressed form of polystyrene. Kits can be supplied with of without the brushless motor and ESC. Easy to built, a couple of evenings and loads of fun on water or land but not grass. This one in police makings, reflective material by courtesy of my local police force.

M.V. TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
The only remaining area requiring significant rework was the bow. Decided now to concentrate on getting the shape and dimensions correct. Made a template from a steel wire coat hangar, shaped to follow the Teakwood bow profile. Cut a mating recess in the upper bow and bulwark, fitted the template into it using CA glue. Once fitted and relatively rigid, cut a piece of styrene to fit into the space between the hull and the template. Epoxied the styrene into place at both the template and to original Velarde hull bow profile. This gave a nice looking bow from the side elevation, one that is also strong. Unfortunately, when viewed from the underside, the usual nice smooth water entry is not apparent. Had two ideas to attempt to blend the bow into the hull sides properly. The first was to cover this transition area with thin styrene and then feather it into the bow and the hull. The second was to use the modelers secret weapon, wood filler and do the same. After either approach planned to cover the whole area in thin glass-fibre cloth and sand down until smooth. Mocked up the styrene installation and decided to abandon the idea. The styrene makes the bow transition bulky, it also became quite clumsy around the upper area. Thought would try the wood filler approach instead. Shaped the rough filler with sand paper, it worked out relatively easily as it required little rubbing down. The modification worked out well and the bow looks satisfactory from both the side and underside. Decided also to replace the pulley drive arrangement with a toothed belt system. Have never tried this before and, as a friend of mine had a selection of belts and pulleys, thought would be useful experience to try it. One question perhaps somebody can help me with – what colour was the deck on this vessel? All my pictures showing the deck are in black and white!