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>> Home > Tags > switch

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Holy SMOKE !! Video, Tin Can Madness by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
Hi Joe, When you click on the Media File icon have you ever noticed the [Download] button in the top left corner of the media window!!?? 😲 Click on that and you are given the choice to Open or Download the file 😉 BTW: to answer your question above - No scale railway at all! I intend to use the loco smokers in RC conversions of 1/350 scale plastic navy ships, such as; HMSs Ark Royal, Colossus, King George Fifth, Prince of Wales, Exeter, and KMSs Bismarck and Graf Zeppelin. As well as RMS Titanic and my 1/128 HMS Belfast and Graf Spee. Two more perhaps for my Southampton tug. Have used them in the dim and distant past for my 1/72 scale RN destroyer. Built a little RC pulse decoder using CMOS chips followed by a transistor driver to switch a relay supplying the smoker coil. See pics of self etched decoder board. The other three outputs are for various lighting effects and destroyer 'Whoop whoop' siren. 30 years old now and still going 😊 The smokers work pretty well just using the capillary action of the thin glass feeder tubes. So no wick to come into contact with a a hot wire coil 😊 They were mounted on a bridge across the cap of a large spray can which I used as the oil tank. Exhaust used the chimney effect of a 10mm alu tube running up the funnel. I'm also still pondering how to turn the usual white steam/smoke black! Cheers, Doug 😎

Perkasa by DannyZ Petty Officer   Posted: 3 days ago
[Score: 8/10] 46"/3000g Perkasa Twin Propellors (3 Blade 50mm) Direct Drive to a AQUASTAR 3660-1700KV (3 Blade) Powered by LiPoly (14.8v) 5Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Turnigy (50Amps) ESC - Comments: Its fast ! Great fun fun boat. Water cooling pump switch for fast runs.

Tin Can Madness by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 5 days ago
Hello, Could not resist starting an experiment with an all metal container. This is a small tomato sauce tin can out of the pantry. First time I tried soldering tin to brass and it is very easy, with flux, to do. Will run test on both smokers and publish photos. As noted, it is a good idea to add a fuse between the batteries and the powers switch as these heaters tend to draw 2 amps or more, be careful with wire gauge as well. Danger of fire.... Joe

Nav. lights and smoker by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 7 days ago
The navigational lights and the smoker still need to be final wired with a power switch for each. The amp draw on the smoker is about 2.2 Amps as measured with my meter, so I intend to use a 2 1/2 Amp Fuse. Will probably just use manual switch rather than remote just to keep it simple, we will see..... Cheers, Joe Joe

Reassembly by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 10 days ago
Continuing on, I finished mounting the light bar, all lights are functioning. For some reason my iPad does not like LEDs and they don't photograph when lit. Made an exhaust stack out of brass tube, mitered the top, soldered and painted. Hull dry now so I mounted the superstructure onto the hatch, reinstalled the tow bits, switch and batteries, RX, motor, etc. Getting close to sea trials, maybe this week schedule permitting. Cheers, Joe

Smoke generator by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 16 days ago
Have just made a prototype of a fan forced smoker which seems to be working well (despite breaking the heater coil by moving it while hot, - had it apart, broke wire, screw and washer repair, not quite as hot) I bought a couple of Heng Long smokers (for R/C tanks or cars) to play with, for $10 NZ each(or 5.3 Euros to you Northerners give or take a yen) from Bangood and just bought another from Ebay. There seem to be 2 different models, as one has a long coil with a lamp wick draped over it, which is sitting in the oil reservoir, the other has a small coil inside a piece of heat resistant woven tubing (as you might find insulating toaster/heater wiring etc) which acts as a wick and that also sits in cotton wool in the reservoir, (this seems to be the better of the two) Tip - don't fill the tank right up, only enough to soak the cotton, element should be just out of the oil. The wick loads the element. The better model seems to have a black top to the tank (also maybe either brown or black tank) and the other has a brown top and dirty brown tank. As with most of this stuff you won't know till you get it what it's going to be. What I did was remove the tank and cut off the pump tube just in front of the screw lugs (see black line in photo) then fitted the tank, and a 40x40x10 5v ESC fan (voltage controlled by a UBEC set to 5v on the jumpers) into a plastic electronics utility box from Jaycar (our local electronics and hobby store). I made up a double JST lead for the 2s 1800Mah Lipo and fired it up (using baby oil). It's pretty much silent and smokes well once it gets warmed up, ( starts smoking in about 5 seconds) You could control it (on/off volume) by either a remote on/off switch or perhaps a small cheap 10A brushed ESC. I would leave the fan running and control the element to avoid burning the element. The original pump tank inlet hole seems ok as is (approx 1.5mm) but you could enlarge it very slightly to get a better flow if you could find a better oil. At the electronics store they have proper smoke machine oil for $20 NZ per litre so I may have a look at that. The reason I went for the fan idea was that I found in std pump form, if I immersed a tube from the tank in water, it sucked water back into the tank. I was hoping it would pump smoke out of my HSL exhausts at water level alongside the cooling water but it would need a very light non return valve to do this. The fan seems to pump the smoke through 2mm ID silicone tube ok, so tubing of similar ID to the OD of the tank outlets should work well. These pumps in original form work pretty well for the price, and are cheap enough to keep a few for spare elements, the only thing is they are a bit noisy but in an 'engine sounding' way, (might add to the effect on a tug or work-boat though) What you have left after this mod is a very handy little geared motor with an eccentric output wheel which could be used for winches, radar and whirly bits of any description (see pic of motor leftover and original) To avoid burnout, these should be run on no more than a 2s (around 7.5v-(suggest 8v max with fan running) The other tank is going to work a lot better than this one but I'm not making a tug, just want a bit of exhaust smoke on start-up etc to go with the 2 sound units. Very cheap to make (around $25 NZ with pump, box, fan and UBEC all through Ebay, Aliexpress and Bangood (and local electronics store) If you wanted to run an ESC to control the smoke and you have no channels left to control it proportionally, you can always try using a second receiver bound to your TX, (if your TX will allow it,) power it and a brushed ESC (wired to the element) as normal and use the throttle channel to plug in your smoke control. This should work if you want more smoke as you accelerate or if you are using only 1 stick on a 2 stick TX you could use your 'elevator' stick pushed up (or a toggle switch if available) to start/stop the smoke (through the brushed ESC setup) . This setup weighs 100g (10g more than std) The quest for lots of smoke continues Will try to upload vid later and update progress.

de Mist Naval Tug by Joburg-sailor Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 16 days ago
As I have made no progress on finding any drawings of the De Mist naval harbour tug ex Simonstown, and as kindly advised by Glyn as having been built by Dorbyl in Durban with VS propulsion, I am now switching my attention to the old steam tugs of the the late 50's and 60's...particularly the JR More (built 1961) that is currently decaying in the Durban Maritime Museum. Again I am on the hunt for drawings that must be more easily available judging by the number of models build of this vessel. She had twin props (rather than Voith Schneider or Schottel) which is something that I can handle! Any help or advice gratefully accepted.

Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels) by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 17 days ago
After the Christmas break its back to the cabin to finish some of the instrument detail. You may recall I detailed the cockpit with some ply constructions to represent the general layout; I also intend to detail the compass, throttle controls, steering wheel, panel lighting, and instrument panel. The instrument panel was copied and scaled from various drawing and pictures and I came up with a three-panel unit where panels 1 & 3 are identical as they are for the two-engine managements system the centre panel deals with electrical things. I intend to make the panel out of 1.5 mm aluminium cut to size on the guillotine I then attached this to a hardwood block with some strong double sided tape this will be more than strong enough to hold the piece for the drilling/light milling operation. I worked out the hole positions using an absolute datum (same as CNC work, if only I was still working) This does take some time using my rather old milling machine making sure any backlash is taken out during the 28 linear movements. I used various sizes of centre drills to produce the holes as they give not only accurate size but also perfectly round holes on thin material and the only ones that needed to be a particular size (6mm dial holes) the others are for switches and LEDs which can all be a 3 mm location hole. Each hole was drilled and then chamfered to simulate a bezel on the dials. Finally, I milled a shallow groove (2mm x 0.3 deep) to simulate the separate panels. I have copied a number of different marine dials from the internet and using PowerPoint I aligned in a complete group and then printed and laminated them, this will be placed behind the aluminium plate using double-sided tape. Having fixed the dials in place I drilled through the holes where LEDSs will fit. The LEDs will be shortened and polished so they are flat to the face; these are then stuck in place. Next, I made all the switches from brass bar with a fine brass pin glued across its face to simulate the lever. These were painted gloss black and the centre pin picked out in red, they were then glued into the 3 mm location hole. The black knobs/pull switches were turned out of black Perspex and polished; they were then glued into the location holes. The whole instrument panel is then pinned on to the wooden framework which has been left in natural wood finish (ply) as it looks like the original boat was just a varnished ply finish.

Power switch location / mount by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 19 days ago
Donnieboy, Thanks for the comment, I appreciate it. Yes, this is intended to be a fast build, so I should finish it soon, not like my SeaTurtle - over two years! Figtree, great idea, making it a mock Capstan. I will consider, see what parts are in my bins..... Joe

Power switch location / mount by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
I really like the way she's coming along! Why don't you make it look like a mock Capstan! The switch that is...….

Power switch location / mount by Donnieboy Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Great progress on the build.I like your idea on mounting the switch.Looking forward to the completion of the build.

Power switch location / mount by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 20 days ago
Continue to mockup exterior a bit, still just rough paint, needs work prior to final colors and finish. Shown in the photos are a Switch Holder made by Dubro, a hobby parts maker in the US. This holder uses a slide switch and allows for through the hull mounting. I use this because I want my switch to be activated without having to remove a hatch. Since my large hatch limited where I could fit the switch, I ended up having to mount it on the bow, not the most desirable position due to bow waves. So I built up a mounting from a plastic pipe fitting, a grommet and a screw cap, tried to make it look nautical. This will raise the top of the rod hole high to further weather proof it. See picture with rod only, I replaced the Dubro rod with a longer one that I made from steel rod I had, threaded it and it works. Will trim the length and attach a finger bulb on top. LAST PHOTO -- EVER FEEL LIKE SOMEONES WATCHING YOU. Cheers, Joe

Electronics,wiring by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 20 days ago
My batteries arrived, could not find locally so ordered through Walmart online. Two - 6volt 4.5AH, wired in parallel to give me 6v @ 9AH. Used inline fuse, prior to switch, then on to the esc, a Dynamite Tazar 15 T marine type. On/off switch will operate from outside so hatch will not have to be removed. Had some real nightmares trying to program this esc! Setup lights would not come on, went through all procedures, slept on it tried ecpvery website, tried again today, nothing. I was about to look into a new purchase, THEN LIKE MAGIC.... I mistakenly switched it to my zBrooklyn Tug mod on th TX which uses the same esc, and it startled me with the motor running and rudder moving. Everything worked great. So I just copied all of the settings into this build on the TX. HAPPY NOW Photo shows the mass of wires that allows me to shift the batteries for final ballasting, they will be tucked away neatly as build is finalized. Regards, Joe

Deck, servo mount by Joe727 Captain   Posted: 28 days ago
Put together a pilot house based on some tugs I've seen. Just freelanced it as I went. I build a lot with styrene so I am used to just cutting and building. I use liquid styrene cement that fuses the materials together. See photo, will trim it out as I mount it, need to add some detail at roof and some Navigational lighting. Put on on 3mm plywood deck, same as hull bottom. The deck is also curved (proper term is SHEAR) and I started to build up some wood edge at the opening. Will sand everything well, then start sealing and priming all surfaces. Made a bracket for the rudder servo mount and an adjacent platform for the ESC and RX. Ordered two 6v 5ah SLA batteries. I will wire in parallel to stay with 6v and get 10ah. I like to stay with 6 volts as I want the motor to run slow like a tug should. Will wire in an in-line fuse. Haven't decided where I will put switch, up high somewhere to avoid water. I will show the wiring once I get to it. This build is going fast because it's a simple design, just what I was looking for. I work on it late afternoons and into the evening while I watch basketball games. About 4 hrs a day. Looking forward to building the hatch and getting some primer started tomorrow. Regards, Joe 👍

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
After completing the cowl, turned to the rear structure covering the gas turbine and other engine spaces. This can readily be made from styrene sheet. The sides and top were cut out, reinforced with “L” shaped angle and fitted together with CA glue. No particular challenges, other than determining where the various section transitions occur. Luckily had two different sets of plans to compare, so the nuances could be established. It was not until the rear structure was fitted into the cowl, the assembly fitted to the removable deck and placed on the hull, realized just how important this milestone was. Once everything is firmly located the accuracy of build becomes readily apparent. Any inaccuracies show up as an obvious misalignment. Was able to check the alignments and squareness using eye, rules, squares and a spirit level and was pleased with the outcome. A subtle sanding of about .020” off the base of one side of the superstructure and everything became square, parallel and correctly aligned. Quite a relief! Have always stressed the importance of accuracy throughout a build. This supported that recommendation. Once the superstructure was completed realized my plan to lift the deck off to gain access to the electrical control switches was impractical. Have thus cut a small access hole in the rear deck to facilitate access. Still undecided how to best disguise the hole, but at least access is now relatively easy. From now on, until the test program can be continued on the water, will add detail to the model. Doubt there will be much to describe is that of interest, or that has not been covered by others. Will continue this blog once there is anything significant to report. In the meantime, best wishes for Christmas and 2019,