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>> Home > Tags > taycol

raf 93 and 94as mentioned earlier boat 93 was purchased from internet built in the late fifties by a scots gentleman by BOATSHED Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 16 hours ago
Both great looking models. Where did you get your little men for the boat ? For my ninth birthday (1959) my parents bought me a 34" Crash Tender and my father (RIP) and I built it over several months and for Christmas that year they bought me an ED HUnter 3.46cc engine. As you said R/C back then was too expensive. We used to go out with it to the nearest pond it was about a mile and a half walk and use it there. Blackheath pond south London. It was either do a straight line to each other and then round in circles until it run out of fuel and the wait until it drifted back in with the breeze. When we built it my dad used to bring home old tea chests broken down in pieces and would use a fret saw to out out more pieces to build a second one at the same time. He said this was so that we didn't do anything incorrectly to the original one. That other one was given to my younger brother and they bought a Taycol Standard and put that in it for him. They were great fun In all we built seven of them 6 were out of tea chests and old orange boxes. He gave them away, I know one of them went to our milkman one to a work mate if his can't remember where the others went. When I left home when I was 20 I left mine there and I never found out where that one went. I have a 46" from the Vintage Model Workshop people and a 34" that I purchased in 1994 on the 50th anniversary when they made a limited run 50 of them, in my shed still in the boxes unmade. I drew round all the parts onto paper and on the Epson printer/scanner I reduced the parts and have built a smaller one I think she is 28 inches long. It is virtually all balsa wood the only parts that are not are the side stringers they are Obeeche strips and the two bottom skins where I done a second skin of 1/64th ply to strengthen it in case of any mishaps on the pond edges. I have not finished that one yet. She did have a trial run on water but due to a too larger 4 bladed prop and too big rudder and maybe the wrong motor she was a bit of a disaster I lost heart for a while after that. I had a bit of a mental brake down due to a serious work problem and gave up on her. That was about 6 years ago now and she is sitting on top of a cupboard in the living room . I will get round to finishing her one day, now I'm retired and back to good mental health.

1960S Taycol electric motor by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Hi CB, Re 'Faraday Cage: I see what you're getting at, of course you are correct that a sealed and grounded metal box would shield the surroundings from spark generated RFI. The 'box' would need to be 'hermetically and electrically sealed', not easy with prop shaft an' all. One hole is enough and Whoops, all those nasty waves have escaped😡. But actually a Faraday Cage works the other way round! It's purpose is to protect people and 'things' inside the cage from outside influences such as high voltage discharge (e.g. lightning) or unwanted radio or other high energy waves by conducting them around the outer skin of the cage to ground. I sat in one during my years of development of mobile radio systems to try to make sure that my test measurements weren't being falsified by external influences. I also didn't want to ruin the tests and alignments my 'bods' were doing on the current production equipment just outside😉 I also had the pleasure 🤔 about 30 years ago of standing inside one at the Deutsches Museum while about a million volts was fired at it! Hair raising😲 but I'm still here to tell the tale😊 and bore the pants off you all😁 Happy suppressing all, cheers Doug 😎

1960S Taycol electric motor by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Hi All. all good advice for the normal brushed motors in cans with carbon brushes. But the Taycol is a totally different animal! It has no carbon brushes. They are simply stamped thin copper or phosphor bronze sheet. Contrary to carbon brushes they need OILING to reduce the wear and sparking! Attached are some pics from my Taycol Target renovation and modification to graphically illustrate the point. Pic one 'Before', pic 2 the new phosphor bronze brushes I made. BTW: don't EVER put oil on your carbon brushes! Try it if you're curious, but then buy a new motor or try to find some replacement brushes 😉 If you run the Taycols dry they wear the brushes through until they have a hole in the middle and spark like crazy Pic 1. You can put what capacitors you like on, you'll still get interference especially at 27MHz. Pic 3 shows the effect this has on the commutator. Pic 4 shows the renovated commutator, there was more 'meat' left on it than I expected😊 Pic 2 shows the new brushes I made from phosphor bronze sheet. The spark energy density spectrum peaks in the HF band (e.g. 27MHz!) and falls off rapidly in the VHF band (30MHz upwards) to virtually nothing in the UHF and Gigahertz bands. That (and the frequency hopping process the 2.4Gig sets use) is why they don't suffer such interference. BTW: as a matter of probably no interest 😉 most sets only use 16 or 32 of the 85 frequencies available in the band! 😲 The capacitor values given above are unusual and will only work with a 'canned' motor, which the Taycol ain't! The norm for a standard canned motor with carbon brushes would be 0.1µF across the terminals and 0.047µF from each terminal to the can, which with a Taycol you ain't got! Earthing to the prop shaft is also a problem. Where do you connect the wire? There's no 'can'. Frame? That's paxolin! try soldering to laminated iron core if you want. Good luck. Won't achieve much even if you manage it🤔 Once again I ask which Taycol you have, as the construction varies and hence the suppression methods / connections. Imperative is the condition of the brushes and commutator to minimise the intensity of the spark generation in the first place! Also important is how you are controlling the speed: also 'Period' with a Bob's Board or resistor coil and servo driven wiper?? These can also be spark sources😡 Never mind wasting precious battery power as heat😲 If you want to convert to using an ESC with proportional forwards and reverse, which Taycol field motors can not do without reversing the polarity of EITHER the field coil or the rotor coil but not both, I can show you how. I did it with Dad's old Taycol Target, see my Build Blog 'Sea Scout Jessica'. Pic 5 shows my Taycol target dismantled, before the renovation. Pics 6 & 7 the reassembled motor after renovation. Pic 8 shows the motor voltage across the terminals before the conversion, complete with gigantic sparks of amplitude 100% of supply voltage. Pics 9 & 10 show the waveform on the terminals of the modified motor at slow and fast speeds, hence different pulse width; broad pulse more speed, narrow less speed. BUT: virtually NO SPARKS😊 and no capacitors😊 Trick is in the bridge rectifier used to connect the motor to a standard brushed ESC. The diodes in the rectifier suppress the sparks😊 Pic 11 shows the wiring 'lash-up' I made to test the motor before mods. Pic 12 the PSU used for the tests. ESC is a 30A Graupner Navy. Instead of TX and RX I used a simple servo tester to drive the ESC. Scope used speaks for itself! As expected speed control was possible but no reverse. Media File 1 Vid shows the renovated motor running but unmodified, complete with sparks😡 Sorry Dave_M, I can't upload the ozone smell🤔 Media File 2 shows the scope display of the unmodified motor test, complete with the sparks that cause the kind of interference you are suffering from. Wanted to add the final vid showing the clean waveform after the mods but it's too big for the site: 30MB max and the vid is 47MB 😭 Penultimate pic shows the circuit used to connect to a standard ESC (Brushed!) for full remote control proportional forward and reverse. Final pic shows the test set up for the fully modified motor. Note 4 connections: 2 to field coil, 2 to brushes (i.e. rotor coil) as per circuit diagram of the interface board. Have fun, cheers Doug 😎

1960S Taycol electric motor by CB90 Lieutenant   Posted: 9 days ago
Could try general suppression capacitors arrangement, I have also seen the can or frame of a motor connected to earth via a wire soldered to the brass propshaft. You could shield the motor by enclosing it in a metal box, be careful not to short circuit anything, similar to Faraday cage .

New drive Train and Oiler by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
Most of this actually took place last August / July! Regular readers may have seen that when Dad built this boat in the 60s he put a Taycol Target field motor in it. About 25 years ago I put a Decaperm and 'modern' transistor ESC in her to provide forward and reverse. Performance was sedate to say the least. I have since modified the Taycol (see below) so it can be run forward and reverse and decided to put it in an ancient Billings Boats Danish fish cutter (Gina) that I inherited from an Aunt. The cutter is badly in need of renovation (see pic 1) and the Taycol will be more suited to her performance requirement! On advice from Canabus in Hobart I obtained a Propdrive 2830 1000kV brushless motor, appropriate ESC and a 35mm 3 blade prop from Raboesch. Pic 2 shows the old and new motors. Next step was to trial fit new motor mount, coupling and prop. Pics 3 &4. While doing this it became obvious that a new shaft was in order, as mentioned in last update. Soooo, - appropriate stainless steel rod, thrust washers and set ring were acquired and back to the workshop. After cutting to length to accommodate the new coupling type a 3mm thread was cut a the prop end. At the inboard end I milled recesses for the grub screws in the set ring and the coupling, pics 5 - 7. I don't like to just file(or even mill) flats for the screws cos they have a tendency to slip and work loose😡 Trial fitted the new shaft and found I'd boobed a bit with the measurements and need extra thrust washers to make up the difference. 😲 Pic 8. No sweat, they came in a pack of 50 anyway😊 You can also see in this pic that I decided to fit an oiler pipe while everything was in bits anyway.😉 To solder it on in a cramped space without setting the boat on fire 😡 I packed a wet rag underneath and used a gas Kitchen Torch! Known as a 'Gas Gourmet Burner'. Yep, those handy little gas torches like your Missus uses to melt the brown sugar on her Crème Brûlée!! So do I, delicious 😜😉 The torches are not expensive, small, very handy, refillable with lighter gas and can be adjusted to a very small hot flame. Ideal for this job. See pics 9 & 10. Pic 11 shows the new motor & mount, shaft and coupling all trial fitted after using a brass alignment tool I quickly made up on the lathe. Pic also shows the trial electrical installation after cleaning up the 'machinery compartment' a little and painting with silver Hammerite. A Quickrun BL ESC is sitting in the bottom in one of the trays my Dad originally fitted for the 2 wet cell (very wet!) 6V lead acid batteries. The home made board on the left carries the battery and ESC connectors, main ON/OFF switch with LED, blade fuse holder with a 20A fuse and a green LED which tells me if the fuse is blown! Stuck on the walls (OK Bulkheads!) with so called Servo Tape are a 6 ch Turnigy iA6 2.4Gig RX and the arming switch for the ESC. Battery compartment is sized to fit 2S and 3S hard case LiPos. For trials I can fit my Wattmeter forward of the switchboard and splice it into the battery supply using Tamiya connectors. Might change these to XT60s later if current drain is more than 12 to 15A. All for now, all this was pulled out again preparatory to cosmetics on the hull, decks, cabin roof and walls inside and out. But that's another chapter so, 'Tune in next week, same time same channel when once again it's time for 'WHAT DO YOU MEAN BUCK RODGERS IS APPROACHING!? 😁 Or 'The Saga of the Cabin Roof' 😉 Cheers Doug 😎 BTW: After drilling the shaft tube for the oiler pipe I flushed it out with light machine oil (pumped in from a big syringe) and shoved a few pipe cleaners through (rotating them on the way) to remove any remaining drill swarf!!

1960S Taycol electric motor by DodgyGeezer Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 19 days ago
Presumably you have looked at the Taycol site? This page looks like the one you need... http:// style='background-color:yellow;'>

1960S Taycol electric motor by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Hi RAFCRASHTENDER, still waiting to know which Taycol you have! Depending on the model the mods to make these old 'one way' field motors go forwards and backwards and suppress the interference, are a little different! Cheers Doug 😎

1960S Taycol electric motor by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
HI Mate, welcome to Mayhem, just a thought, I to prefer a period transmitter with my older models, I have a Macgregor trany which our club guru converted to 2.4gh with a Futaba module, works brilliantly, best of both worlds Mark

1960S Taycol electric motor by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 23 days ago
Hi RCt! which Taycol is it that you have? On this site you can find my posts about converting a 1960s Taycol Target to run both fore and back under RC. There were several Taycol motors at that time. I can also advise on converting other types. The conversion also solves the interference problem 😊 Cheers Doug 😎

1960S Taycol electric motor by RAFCRASHTENDER Seaman   Posted: 23 days ago
HI just fitted 1960s Taycol electric motor in RAF launch runs fine interfering with radio when running 27 mhz Futabe 1974 need help suppressing motor can any body help dont want 2.4 radio want to keep period radio. Thanks Alan👍

Graupner Elke HF 408 by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 29 days ago
BTW Allen, Dave's comments re 'old motors' go in the right direction but the basic thought and measurement technique are not quite right. There should never be ANY ohm meter reading between armature coils (i.e. motor supply connections) and case! Do by all means try this, but anything less than infinity, '---' on most digital meters, means a scrap motor😡 This test really requires an insulation test using what is commonly called a Mega meter. This has a crank generator which puts high voltage (ca 1000V+😲) across the unit under test. It measures the insulation resistance in millions of Ohms, hence the name Mega! For us modellers not a particularly useful or practical test! The most common form of deterioration in old motors is cracking and flaking of the insulating varnish of the armature windings. This does not normally cause shorts or spurious measurable resistance to the case but causes internal shorts in the windings thus reducing their resistance and therefore increasing the current they draw for a given voltage applied, as Dave indicated. There are two ways you can check this, if you have a decent Ohm meter, one less, one more accurate. The less accurate is done externally by measuring across the normal motor connections and thus include the resistance of the brushes and connections. Connect the meter where you normally connect the output from the ESC. Slowly rotate the motor so you can feel the slight 'click' as the motor moves from one winding to the next (or one magnetic pole to the next if you like😉) You should see a few Ohms resistance at each pole. Value depending on the quality of the carbon brushes. Better quality brushes (more copper content) = lower resistance. Note and compare each 'pole' reading. If one 'pole' reading is significantly lower than the others then that winding has an internal short😡 The motor may overheat in that winding, depending on how many wires are affected, and fail eventually. The more accurate method is to dismantle the motor and measure the winding resistances directly at the commutator, i.e. without the brushes in circuit. But this is only useful for nuts like me 😁 as in my 50 year old Taycol Target renovation. I was lucky no shorts and all windings same resistance + or - a gnat's whatsit!😊 Sooooo, to cut a long story sideways😉I think it's very unlikely your motor has any internal problems. I recently found one of the ancient Mabuchis I originally fitted in my HMS Hotspur destroyer 51 years ago, it still clattered along, bearings shot but electrically still OK 😊 Just take what you've got now down to the lake and give her a Go. If she looks right then she most probably is! As my German colleagues would say "Always a hand's width of water under your keel". Cheers Doug 😎 PS: "But trust me on the sunscreen" 😁

Graupner Elke HF 408 by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 29 days ago
Evenin' Dave, "Interesting stats especially the stall current. This would rate the motor at 280 Watts with your 7.2v battery" 😲 If the battery pack was 7.2 volts nominal and was 'healthy' then according to Allen's measurements it was down to an average of about 0.98V per cell. Also not so healthy for a NiMH. 5.91/5=1.182 volts per cell. A healthy voltage for NiMH 😊 Indicates a shorted cell if it was a 7.2 pack, and the healthy cells could still deliver 40A for a short while. If the boat needs ballast anyway I would go for the useful ballast of a 6V SLA. Which is what I intend to use in my Danish cutter with the Taycol Target. Such boats don't need the short term, high current that NiMH and LiPos can deliver. G'night All, Cheers Doug 😎

Graupner Elke HF 408 by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Wow! So much done in 3 weeks! Brilliant 👍 Look forward to the Maiden report. Love the woodwork, nice job. Inspiration for my Danish cutter refit😉 Would have thought that a 320A ESC is a bit overkill for a 'plodder'!? But, if was 'in the box' ... I'll be putting a 10A mTronik in my cutter, with a modified Taycol Target, ca 6A max (I hope!) Nothing doing here at the moment, everything frozen over and it's snowing again 😡 Cheers Doug 😎

Decks removed by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi deep..., Don't know about 'used' looks more like THROWN IN' 😡 from across the room! Good luck, just don't hit the chisel too hard!! Try with a not too blunt chisel to get the bevelled edge under the rim of the c**p. Re: time to work... The fish cutter is well down the to-do list 😉 Although I have managed to clean up and modify my old Taycol Target field motor (removed from the Sea Scout) to run both forward and backward off a normal brushed ESC which will now go in the cutter 😊 My Sea Scout renovation is top of the list. She's now fitted with a new RX, shaft/prop and brushless and ready for sea trials, when the local lake melts 🤔 Then just cosmetics, mostly in the cockpit and after deck area. After that fit decent brass props and electronics to my HMS Belfast. After that .... we'll see 😉 PT109 needs a respray and electronics ... Graf Spee needs a new prop shaft stbd side ... Catalina needs electronics fitting ... Southampton tug needs putting back together ... 🤔 As a single pensioner finding time is easier that it was a year ago. The GF has her own abode ca 2 miles away 😉😉 Happy chiselling, Doug 😎 PS suspect the biggest mess from the cutter will be removing what looks like layers of ancient oil based paint 😡 Will wait for the summer to do that outside.

replacing propshaft by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Heartily agree on all points Chris👍 I am faced with the same decision with the restoration of my Sea Scout. On the basis of 'if it ain't broke don't fix it' I decided to leave the shaft angle as Dad built it in the mid sixties to fit his Taycol Target. I've now fitted a brushless and made a new shaft for the original tube, repainted hull and fitted out the 'engine room'. Pics show starting point and current state. Can't wait for the weather to warm up to try her out😉 I'm aiming for a trim at rest slightly nose up and water about 1/2 inch or so up the transom. Then trials to see if she comes easily on the plane and is stable. As usual a bit of trial and error, aka 'suck it and see' 😁 Happy Holidays and sailing all, cheers Doug 😎