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>> Home > Tags > unknown

unknown
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Unknown by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 30 days ago
Seems there were quite a few 'flying tugs'! Mind your heads chaps!!! 😲 http://www.tynetugs.co.uk/TugsF.html 😎

Unknown by kmbcsecretary Admiral   Posted: 30 days ago
I do remember that there was a number of variations of this type of tug that used the same hull but with slight changes on deck but I can't think of there names at the moment, they were all called flying ..... It will come to me when I stop thinking about it 🤔

Unknown by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 30 days ago
Hull looks right, but s/structure / funnel don't 😲 http://www.tynetugs.co.uk/flyingkestrel1913.html 😎

Unknown by Ballast Captain   Posted: 30 days ago
Thanks for that buddy, I will give that alley some research.👍

Unknown by kmbcsecretary Admiral   Posted: 30 days ago
If I'm not mistaken it looks like the flying kestral steam tug that if I remember correctly it was a free plan in model boats magazine

Unknown by Ballast Captain   Posted: 30 days ago
Looks like it could be a Thames Steam Tug, I'm not sure ! I have just acquired this lovely hull and I am not sure of it's build or origin. It is fibreglass and is 57" (1450mm) LOA X 14.5" (370mm) Beam. It has a very basically built superstructure which I don't think is appropriate. I would be very grateful if anyone has any idea what she is and any other information as to weather it was a kit that has been modified. I would love more information as to scale etc. Regards your shipmate. Ballast AKA Alan.

Tempory computer by Colin H. Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Ron, Thanks for your comments. The small Tug (EMANUEL) is 16" long, scale unknown. No crew as yet, but will try some of my model railway figures. The larger Tug (VALIANT) is 48" and is 1/32nd scale. But using 1/35th scale crew. As for your Gipsy yacht. I'd love a copy of your plans, could it be possible to copy and email. If yes I'll pm you my email address, it's quite possible I have a suitable part built hull that was donated to me at a show last year. Cheers Colin.👍

2 Unknowns by Baggie Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Lovely looking boats and you sound as if you had a great time in Plymouth too.

2 Unknowns by SelwynWilliams Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Two models seen at the Plymouth Gin Factory in the Barbican. Whilst there I had to sample the product and chose the Plymouth Navy Gin, which is gunpowder proof at over 57% and like drinking a single malt compared to a blend. Recommended. We were in Plymouth for the IMASS shipwreck conference the next day, which ranged from Byzantine to WW1 Naval shipwrecks, including HMS Hampshire and HMS Vanguard.

Strange Email by Wingcoax Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 4 months ago
This type of "spam" is not unknown, in that you can be hacked and end up sending out Spam to all your contacts. It has happened to me before and to some friends. As advised, check your security and change your password.

Blue Pearl (sailing barge) by Bryan-the-pirate Commander   Posted: 6 months ago
Not quite a build as I found it on Ebay but I have added to it. The barge was build in the 1970's and was very well made. Design is unknown to me but I first assumed it was a thames barge based on the sail layout. I was so convinced I dyed the sails red and built some false side keels. Then I saw another model thames barge, it was longer and narrower with a slightly different sail set up. So here I was a sailing barge with red sails that wasn't what I had thought it was. What else do you do apart from making it fun.

rotating radars off mast by seafarer Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 7 months ago
Thanks Dave, you've set me off on another adventure into the unknown but I think I'm learning....do I need the Arduino UNO controller and could I control two motors off it (it doesn't matter if the speed is the same ) . If I don't need the controller ,could you explain a bit more about using the POT (presumably a potentiometer?)

NAXOS - Fishing Boat by hecrowell Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 7 months ago
Speaking of plans - here is what I have managed to dig up. Obtained online and bearing no copyright marking, i am hopeful that I am not subject to copyright infringements...if I am, they will be imediately removed. Lots of reference numbers, but no key to let me know what they refer to. Plans are in unknown language to me, but I suspect Slovak.

How do I find out the voltoge of my motor without it burning out by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
Hi Chris I know of no easy way for you to determine the voltage. However motors do have a coil resistance value measured across the terminals. Also if you can see the coil windings a thick wire usually indicates a motor designed for high speed and current. A thinner wire may produce a motor with lower speed and less current and more tork. If you check the Graupner and look at the windings this may help you identify the other two. In my experience it's usually too low a voltage that's the problem resulting in slow revs and little if any tork. At the other end of the scale too high a voltage will result in very high revs and lots of sparks from the brushes. In this case if you continue to apply the volts you will damage the motor. Many electric drills were powered by motors rated at 9v and did indeed have an impeller cooling fan. That said Mabuchi and Johnson produced a vast range of motors all looking similar on the outside but wired very differently inside depending on the ultimate use. I suggest you try with progressively higher voltages and assess which is best for the two unknowns. Finally most motors are designed to work over a range of voltages so I usually measure both the upper and lower values so I can select the right motor for a particular model.

How do I find out the voltoge of my motor without it burning out by octman Admiral   Posted: 8 months ago
I have several motors that all look very nearly the same. One I know is a Graupner Speed 600 which is 8.4v but of the other 2, one is said to be 12v(was working with an 11.1 lipo) and the other one is unknown. It has a built in cooling impeller so probably came from an electric tool of some sort. Neither of these 2 have any markings or labels. Is there any way that I can test them for their normal working voltages without endangering them? Chris