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>> Home > Tags > varnish

varnish
varnish
more money than sense by jimdogge Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 4 days ago
last pictures l posted l painted the wave princess l changed my mind and decided to go for some planking on the decks and cabin roofs l have also done a little bit of tarting up using some brass welding rod and brass tube l am quite pleased with the out come so far. these piccys are about a month old now so she has had a god rub down and given six coats of clear varnish. l will post more piccys when l have installed the windows and frames.

Metal sanding plates by Nonsuch Seaman   Posted: 5 days ago
I'm guessing that most of us remember Sandvik sintered metal sanding plates? I've had one for nearly forty years and it still works fine, but have always kept an eye open for another one. Last week I found a mini version on eBay, the NT Sander from Japan. It's made from 0.2mm stainless steel and about the size of a credit card. It looks as though the "pimples" are laser etched. It's flexible but comes with a sheet of double sided tape so it can be attached to a block. I bought the fine grade which is perfect for removing grain, raised after varnishing small parts. I doubt it will last forty years like the Sandvik, but it's a lovely piece of kit.

Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc.... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Thanks, onetenor. I put a coat of said varnish on today and the repairs almost disappeared. Very pleased. The rest of the day was visitors, so not much done. Martin

Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc.... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
I did indeed use an abrasive polish on the cream paint, but as it was a very severe crack or two all along the hull, I injected resin in the crack and clamped it up as far as possible, then Milliputted in to fair it. This was between two strips of tape to prevent the spread of epoxy or Milli further than necessary. I managed to match the cream more or less and once I've put a coat of nice amber spar varnish on it'll look like the original when heeled and won't show at all when on display. Martin

Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc.... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Useful to know about Vanish. It certainly worked on my Star yacht sails. Fortunately the sails on the Ailsa yacht are lovely anyway, just some new rigging cord required. I would say the sails were the same as bed sheets. I used some white spirit to clean the deck on the Ailsa. Most of the dirt being handling muck. Then I waxed it with 3M wax...twice. It's wonderful stuff which I bought for our historic narrowboat's new paintwork. It was a wooden boat and when I replaced the cabins and had painted them with Tra-mar Coatings hand made enamel paint, I waxed them with 3M's wax and they went another 3 winters before I sold the boat, with the rain still rolling off in beads. The Ailsa is now waiting for some spar varnish over the repair's creamish paint. I couldn't match it perfectly, but I didn't want to repaint the whole hull. All the repairs are under the waterline so it shouldn't show. The Star...I never heard of them using aluminium for masts. How would they have kept the rigging eyes in place? Martin

Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc.... by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
I think Hydrogen Peroxide is the active ingredient in Vanish and the like. It is regarded as "The Safe Bleach" in the cleaning products industry. It remains active on cleaned surfaces for up to 72 hrs.Hypochlorite types only for as long as you can smell them. It is safe to use on just about any surface or fabric and mixed with a small amount of say washing up liquid it will clean body fats from baths and showers and other fats from cookers and work surfaces. Also removes mould etc. It produces no toxic fumes and is safe on the skin. I worked for a company called Environmental Chemicals who were devoted to safer cleansing alternatives. You would be amazed at it's effect on a previously washed bread board. I won't list all they made but the one with the HP in it was very popular with industry and the public. I could identify most of their chemicals used by smell and Hydrogen Peroxide was one. Well not so much a smell but it's action on my nasal passages. Likewise with gas fire and boiler fumes. A very handy thing to have when I was plumbing/gas fitting. Anyway back to the point. You can bleach your sails safely with it as often as you like to make them as white (or_ grey) as you like. It also shifts grime from painted/varnished wood and metals. A mention was made by someone (Westie ?)of metal masts etc on a star Yacht. I thought all Star yachts had all wooden masts and spars. I knew the Denyes.Jean-Jacques in particular and was allowed into the hallowed halls once or twice but didn't see everything. I was told that after the war wood was in short supply and old mangle rollers that were made with apple wood were sought and used . I am waiting to get back on my feet to restore the two yachts I was given for my two boys at that time.Around '67/68. Only the smaller unnamed ones. I don't know what no they are. I've already made a mast for one but all metal fittings will need cutting out afresh and new suits of sails acquired. Regarding sails. Handkerchiefs are too fine a material to allow recovery in a blow down. They don't allow the water out so keep the yacht flat. Anyone know of an alternative solution? Sorry to go on but I hope this diatribe has been helpful to someone.👍

Pretend deck planking by cormorant Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 18 days ago
May be too late, but have you thought about real planking? This was my first attempt following advice on various youtube videos and studying pictures of the full sized boat. Planks supplied by Jotika. They have various sizes and woods and worked out to quantity when I gave them the deck measurements. I used cyano to glue to a plastic deck and sealed with a proprietory outdoor satin varnish. I found it very satisfying and was pleased with the end result. Ps. Please excuse the black dots of fly sht. on the deck in the first picture. Steve

Transfers by Haverlock Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 days ago
its even better if you can get a hold of a laser printer since the "ink" is waterproof so no need to varnish before doing the waterslide.

Pretend deck planking by TOWN3810 Seaman   Posted: 22 days ago
Hi Biro is good just rolls along less effort than pens or pencils it also indents the wood slightly and gives a very good effect Tung oil is also good The first deck I did I used varnish and the Biro faded but not so with the oil I like to think I invented the method but thinking can be dangerous Cheers Ian T

Spraying Again....... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 23 days ago
Mornin' Peter, Red primer can be a good match for some anti-fouling paints. If you are happy with the colour - fine. BUT!! Seal the primer paint with several thin coats of matt or silk clear varnish for the reasons mentioned to Neville above! Primer is porous!! Flatten the primer with 1000 / 1500 wet n dry until your fingertips tell you the surface is good. Apply the varnish in several thin coats, flattening lightly with 2000 / 3000 w&d between coats, until you have a good sealed surface. The varnish (or lacquer) will also give some extra protection against knocks and bangs 😊 Cheers, Doug 😎

Pretend deck planking by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
"Danish oil is a hard drying oil, meaning it can polymerize into a solid form. It can provide a hard-wearing, often water-resistant satin finish, or serve as a primer on bare wood before applying paint or varnish. It is a "long oil" finish, a mixture of oil and varnish, typically around one-third varnish and the rest oil. Rags used for Danish oil have some potential risk of spontaneous combustion and starting fires from exothermic oxidation, so it is best to dry rags flat before disposing of them, or else soak them in water." 😲 😎

Pretend deck planking by TOWN3810 Seaman   Posted: 24 days ago
Hi I seal first one coat of Danish Oil then i use Biro pen and finish with several coats of oil The Biro does not fade over time but it does if varnish is used Cheers Ian T

Spraying Again....... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
Hi Neville, Check out my Sea Scout 'Jessica' renovation blog for how to achieve good paint finish! 'Wet n dry' is the ONLY way to go. Right from the priming stage. It stops the 'riding' you describe and the generation of flying dust which is anathema to any paint or varnish finish, but you do have to clean and re-wet the paper and the object you are sanding from time to time!!! Any mistakes at that stage will carry through to the top coats and still be visible 😡 Don't quite understand how you created 'mouths'. I'm wondering if you sprayed too close and/or too heavy!? Your apparently exorbitant paint consumption seems to hint at this🤔 For the record; I started with 240 on the primer/filler for my Sea Scout and worked up through 400, 600, 1000, and 2000 and 3000 for the final top coats and deck varnish. All 'Wet', with a few drops of liquid soap added at the top coat stages, i.e. from the 1000 stage. At the end I polish with a mild cutting polish 'Anti hologram' they call it here, from the auto industry. Tedious I agree and a generous dollop of patience is required (the 'Secret Ingredient' I have often mentioned here 😉 But when you see the result it warms the cockles and makes it all worthwhile.😊 Happy spraying, cheers, Doug 😎 BTW; for the blue on my Sea Scout hull I used a 400ml rattle can for several coats (more than three in the end) and there's still some left ! BTW2; For masking I use Tamiya tape for nice crisp edges. Fill in behind that with 'normal' fine masking tape and newspaper.

Painting by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 27 days ago
Ah, there are motor boats, Doug and then there are woodies! Woodies have varnish...everywhere, motor boats are a little more utilitarian I think. Perhaps the Fairey tendency to be on the sea rather than freshwater lakes meant they had scrubbed teak decks. If you made the deck planks from, say 2mm stuff, they would curve no problems, but veneers would have to be cut to shape. Nice sharp knife and gently does it is the trick. Martin

Painting by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 28 days ago
I notice your first picture shows properly joggled planks into the King plank, but Doug's picture shows no joggling on, I assume, a similar boat. Joggling will look so much nicer. Not keen on the varnished deck of the boat seen from the rear. Scrubbed teak is the "proper" finish for a deck. Cheers, Martin