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>> Home > Tags > vessel

vessel
vessel
Tank Steering by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Hi Doug Enjoying your new toy. Not sure that Mode 2 or 1 for that matter has much relevance if you are using two sticks to control your ESCs. The gimbal posted by Canabus looks like the Taranis stick with an additional rotary control at the tip. Most gimbals use a spring to effect self centering and removing said spring disables this feature. One of the reasons I use the Taranis is to allow me to mix at the tx avoiding lots of complicated wiring and expensive mixer boards on the vessel. I did find the Conrad Reely HT-6 but not on the Hobbyking site. Can you post a pic please? Dave

ESC POWER by RHBaker Admiral   Posted: 14 days ago
Hi Dave, The vessel in question was my Damen 4207, which has featured in an earlier blog. The installation of the LI-PO battery transformed the model, which now floats above the waterline and performs well. I am still trying to get a video and, once the new ESCs are fitted, will try again.In the meantime here is a picture of her underway.

arun 54 by RHBaker Admiral   Posted: 14 days ago
You can also check the RNLI library on line. They sell arrangement drawings for their vessels

Trumpeter Seawolf Conversion by haleskevin Petty Officer   Posted: 17 days ago
I have seen this done a few times online and figured it would be a quick turn around; I was wrong. Every time I think I have it licked, another problem arises. I am at two pumps, one motor, two micro switches and three servos. I do not have batteries or cooling for the motor figured out. But when I get tired of my scratch builds I go back to this. I did my math and six vessels await my attention plus these two fine examples. Then, I start looking at plans for another one. I may have a problem. Latest picture is the ballast tank sealed with fittings.

Firing Battleship at Wings & Wheels (UltraHD/4K) by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 18 days ago
Hi Boaty, Apparently so! 😊 There was some discussion about this here a little while ago https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peasholm_Park "Events Naval Warfare event The Naval Warfare event, Battle of Peasholm,[9] has been played out for half an hour three times a week during the summer season for over 80 years. The model boats used are mostly man powered earning the fleet the title of "The smallest manned navy in the world". All the boats were man powered, until 1929, when electricity was introduced, and now only the larger boats need to be steered by council employees. In the early days, the models were First World War battleships and a U-boat. Then, after the Second World War, the fleet was replaced with new vessels and the battle that was recreated was the Battle of the River Plate." http://www.discoveryorkshirecoast.com/Scarborough-Naval-Warf... Pics attached!😉 Cheers Doug 😎 (Don't get shot😡)

Firing Battleship at Wings & Wheels (UltraHD/4K) by boaty Commander   Posted: 18 days ago
This brings back memories to when I was a 7 year old in 1959. During the family holiday in Scarborough we visited Peas Holme Park and there was some action on the boating lake. It appeared to be an enactment of the Battle of the Atlantic with some very large models of ships of the era shooting it out. I recall that some of boats these sank and I have a vivid memory of a merchant vessel being shelled with flares being set off on the deck to simulate a direct hit. Does anyone have details, ie did the ships have a person on board or where they radio controlled and I also noted some wires above the lake which dive bombers ran along with imitation bombs Does this event still take place as I know that at one time persons wanted to stop it due to Germany now being one of our NATO allies. Boaty😎

lighting by BOATSHED Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Found this on the internet, hope this will help you . From early times, to avoid collisions, ships underway or at anchor by night carried at least a single lantern showing a white light. There seems to have been no fixed rule about the use of lights until 1824 when two white lights were required to be shown in ships navigating the canals of the Netherlands and Belgium. In 1845 coloured lights were authorized for this purpose. In that same year HMS COMET carried out experiments at Pithead with red, green and white lights, and 1847 Admiralty regulations called for all British steamships to be fitted in the approved manner. No such requirement existed for sailing vessels. After 1850 all steamships in the busy fairways of the open seas were required to show coloured lights by night. The colours red and green had been selected as the least likely to be confused. The French in 1863 instituted a practice of making the lights visible on the beam as well as ahead. This led to international agreement on the use of sidelights, visible through definite arcs. About the same time sailing vessels were first required to show red and green sidelights. Trinity House, the British pilotage authority, had ruled in 1840 that two steamships steaming toward each other by night, to avoid collision were each to alter course to starboard, thereby keeping the other ship on the port hand. The red light, indicating danger, was assigned to the side to be steered away from. A series of conference of the principal maritime nations has produced the International Regulations for Preventing collision at Sea, in which are embodied directions regarding lights, steering and sailing rules. In the most recent revision (1953) these are greatly clarified, and are made applicable to aircraft taxi-ing or alighting on water in ocean areas. Further revisions, drafted at the 1960 Safety of Life at Sea conference, will soon be brought into effect

M.V. Conserver by Welshsailor Seaman   Posted: 1 month ago
[Score: 8/10] 29"/5000g M.V. Conserver Capable of 3mph Single Propellor (3 Blade 45mm) Direct Drive to a Electronize 545-12 (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (7.2v) 5Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Mtroniks Viper 15 ESC - Comments: Model Slipway kit of a full size buoy maintenance/survey vessel still working out of Leith harbour, Edinburgh. Maiden voyage took place a week ago, it still needs work to finish it. It performed really well with a very tight turning circle.

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Looking through a book on Cargo liners and found a picture of MV TEAKWOOD, built in in 1962 at Sir James Laing & Sons in Sunderland. She is a very attractive vessel, does anybody know anything about her?

Rasta Craft - Jamaican Pleasure Boat by Krampus Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
1 JUL 17 - Using a borrowed Lisa M yacht hull made by German manufacturer Krick and the cockpit of a scratch built I made earlier (now defunct), I'm now working on this new vessel. For no logic reason, I decided to use Jamaican Rasta culture for inspirational purposes. Just something different for may flotilla. Water tested with a 30A Mtroniks "Tio" controller, a 500-series motor, a 10.8 NIHM battery and a 40mm propeller. A winning combination for this boat. I added spray rails and just painted the hull in yellow

New to hobby by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Yep, it's an old Robbe kit - Bohrinselversorger', an offshore supply vessel. Scale 1:25, LoA 126 or 130cm? See here for a video of one in action at Ahlen, Germany. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Inw5IBUmzFE Yours for only €53 😉 http://www.ebay.de/itm/Modellschiff-ORKNEY-EXPRESS-von-Robbe... Cheers Doug 😎

Winch by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Build coming along well and this certainly looks authentic for a fishing vessel, and the rust will certainly help!

Building a deck by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
I began laying the deck on April 5th. It had snowed as recently as the week before, but it finally warmed up enough to use glue. The strips were cut to 6-5/8" length, about 20' in 1:36 scale. I used a black marker on two opposite sides to represent the pitch in the seams. The deck was laid in a 5-plank pattern to mix up the butt-joints as much as I could. My research on her decking found she's had various styles and plank widths over her life. The earliest photo showing her deck that I could find, showed it straight planked with 7 or 8" wide boards based on the number of planks between her waterway and the main hatch coaming. Her waterway logs seem to be placed ON the decking, as there's no margin planks or joggling - even today. The planking was set with gel CA. Gorilla sells it in a nice bottle with a metal pin in the cap to keep the spout open. It would up taking 3 of these bottles to complete the deck. The planks are cut at a 45 on the ends along the fore and aft access hatches, to try and hide this seam as much as possible. Once the deck was down, I scraped it. The glue is more resistant than the basswood is, so sanding would have scalloped the wood between seams. Scraping makes everything level. Some lite sanding, more to polish than remove anything, was done last. I had planned to stain the deck a very light grayish tint, but an active naval vessel gets holy-stoned regularly and wouldn't be gray as the ships that sit at a dock today are. In all it took 455 pieces to complete the deck and there wasn't any scrap longer than 1 inch left over. In all I have 3/4" deck beams, 1/4" plywood, a layer of 4oz cloth and resin, and a 3/16" basswood deck - I don't recall why I designed it so heavy, but it certainly doesn't hurt the model at all, and I think the 3/16" square strip will prove to have been easier to set than the 1/16" x 1/4" planks Pride and Macedonian will get. The deck go a coat of water-based satin poly, and I stared working on hatch coamings, cap log, and waterways. The cabin skylight and two hatched forward of it, including the capstan, and all combined into one hatch where the battery is accessed, and which hides the aft ballast rod and main power switch. The cap logs Are 1/2" wide x 1/4" tall basswood that was tren'led, glued, and copper nailed, onto the deck, flush with the outside of the hull covering this seam completely. The the angled wood waterways were installed around the inside of the cap log, and the deck got a coat of oil-based satin poly. This actually leeched in and made the marker seams bleed a little. In hind sight, I think I'll go with paint over marker for seams in the future. The coamings got painted black. I'm not sure why the Navy painted deck fittings black. It was even common to paint to top surfaces of tops black. I wonder how many injuries and losses this cost the navy that white paint would have prevented. Anyway... Constellation didn't have "solid" bulwarks, but rather she had hammock irons bolted to her cap log. These were removed when Baltimore tried to pass her off as a frigate and tossed in the bilge. When the ship was restored as a sloop of war, they found all but one. These irons are designed to have wooden rails at their tops, inboard and out, and have holes so several lines can be run through them. The Navy in it's wisdom though, decided to wainscot them to appear as solid bulwarks, despite the additional splinter hazard that would be in battle. I wasn't making all those metal stanchions just to hide them under wood and tarps, so I made wood blocks sheathed in sheet bass, scribed to look like vertical wainscotting. It was the end of April by now, and the Baltimore Port Expo was in two weeks. I wanted to have hammocks in the bulwarks, as she appears in the portrait, but there was no time to figure this out, so I layered on some balsa and shaped it so it looked like tarps were laid over the hammocks. When I figure out how I'll represent the stowed hammocks, I can pull the balsa off easily enough. The bulwarks on, I made some fittings for the spencer masts; installed the eye bolts at the base of the masts; made some bollards (or whatever name they gave those posts), made and installed the catheads, which are laminated 1/16" basswood. I then started setting up a jury rig and her controls so she could sail at the Port Expo. I set her t'gallants and all three heads'ls this time around. By the night before the Expo, she was ready to go.

Triton by Krampus Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
With my boats getting routinely stranded in the middle of nowhere, I felt compelled to commission a rescue vessel and "Triton" was born. "Triton" is a Springer-type tug push boat. With a hull and superstructure consisting of an “Indiana” style command cabin, it was built using a pretty basic birch plywood American kit designed for swimming pool water polo. Kit altered to resemble a fictitious Salvamento Marítimo (Spanish Coast Guard) unit following Salvamento Marítimo’s actual boat markings. Equipment and deck layout inspired on actual Springer tug push boats supporting larger vessels and barges found in US and European ports and rivers. Model built during September – October 2015. Approx. 1/18 scale. Real life boat could be a 30-footer (9.14m) vessel. Equipped with 9v LED navigation lights and sound system. Powered by an HPI Racing 1145 Gt 550 Motor, NiMH 7.4v battery, a 3-bladed 44mm propeller, and a 6-12V 320A RC Ship & Boat R/C Hobby Brushed Motor Speed Controller.

Damen Stan 4207 by RHBaker Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Decided to advance LI-PO plans and try a 4S 4000mAh pack. This weight of this pack reduced overall model weight by 8 oz, so it is now 9.6 lbs, close to the original target. Was also to slide the pack further sternwards until it touched the inner face of the RIB slipway, about 2.5” from the stern. The effect on the waterline was limited; the model now sits slightly higher with the waterline remaining level. Slowly increased the speed of the motors to assess the LI-PO performance. There was a significant improvement. There is no need to use “ full” power as it probably exceeds max scale speed. As the model accelerates the bow lifts exposing an area of the red bottom paint. The wake streams down the side of the vessel and curls off the spray rails. She looks very realistic. The attached picture is at part speed. The model is totally controllable, the influence of the centre fins is noticeable as the heeling is not pronounced unless extreme manoeuvring is tried. After 90 minutes of use decided all original objectives for the model are now accomplished. She looks and performs well. The next task is to tidy up the temporary wiring and fit the LI-PO properly. Will also have to re-route more accessories through the voltage reducer fitted for the bow thruster so the LED lights are not overpowered. Have also bought a small r/c controlled child’s jet ski toy with the intention is using the drive and control system in the RIB. It will require much mutilation of both the jet ski and the RIB to work them in together, but think it can be achieved. My next blog will tell.