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>> Home > Tags > vessel

vessel
vessel
Nomenclature... by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 17 hours ago
Ha Ha i got no credit for some things I came up with either Trouble is I can only remember the word FANTABULOUS which I invented by accident Fantastic and fabulous ame to mind together as I was talking and the hybrid word came out.🤓🤓 Re the BECS I know that but I couldn't explain it like you and was also asking what I thought Martin wanted to know. Floating arrays? Didn't TESLA do something similar during the RC boat . trials? Or was that actually the vessel itself? In one of my bigger boats I used FOUR ex GPO L/A cells which was enough with it's Ex forces motors to put a bone in the boat's teeth as the say. The boat ? RMV Mauritania 5 feet long but very light for it's size hence the need for the accumulator cells Balsa frames and sides with ceiling tile superstructure with balsa bracing. Free running so it was always heeling and with the bone creaming at the forefoot was very impressive. Destroyed by a guy collapsing on it. He'd only fainted but me pore owl gerl was just chips and snowflakes from one end to the other. Nothing to repair as there was nowt left to repair🤐 I kept one cell for starting glow motors and sold the rest at a good profit. Incidentally the motors were that good that when everyone found out where to get them They were sold out in 2 days with no more available anywhere Don't know what they were out of but from the overspray on them ( cockpit green but the Yank version -- we thought) we believed they were from planes. Very solid with 9 segment rotor . Totally enclosed. Airtight? presumably to prevent arcing igniting fumes. The rotorsegments? We found out when one didn't run so we stripped it and found them shining at us. Lovely tight windings. Thick with shellac/varnish. The problem? A stuck brush caused by a tight pivot Drop of 3 in one oil and a very light smear of grease cured it. The carbons were replaceable if you could make or find some. I found a firm in Formby that made and sold brushes for anything. I fixed son's Fiat automatic thenks to them. It had a magnetic clutch and the brushes were so worn we didn't know what the shape should be. Turned out to be about 2 inches long rectangles plain and simple. LOL. Wish I could find some of those lovely engineered motors now.😤👍

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
Adjusted the transom flaps and reprogrammed the ESCs to the softest start settings, retested. Until now, the test runs did not have the duration or stability to really examine what was happening. Using 3 S batteries acceleration is rapid and a is plane quickly achieved. However, as the acceleration continues and speed increases, the bow digs in. A cloud of spray then surrounds the model as the plane is lost. Brushless motors do not modulate as smoothly as brushed and adjusting power tends to be erratic or exaggerated. This is a scale model and the propeller shaft angles are per the plans. The thrust from the propeller has two components, horizontal and vertical. The horizontal propels the vessel forward. However, the vertical component forces the stern upwards and, correspondingly, the bow down. Have moved as much weight as possible towards the stern to counteract this, limited by maintaining the correct displacement and waterline. The easiest solution is to reduce motor power, decreasing both speed and the lifting component. Decided to retry the 2S batteries as they give reduced power. A plane is again achieved, but as the motor response is more docile, it can be controlled. If the speed gets too high the bow lowers, as before, but the motor output can be more easily adjusted. Spent a pleasant half hour or so with the vessel accelerating onto and off a nice, controllable plane. Much less spray and drama than with 3S and much more controllable. Have now decided to revise plans and use 2S rather than 3 batteries. A further advantage is the motor noise is muted and now sounds more like a gas turbine than a dental drill! Finally feeling comfortable with the model. Will thus shelve further building until the late fall when sailing in Canada concludes. Want to enjoy the rest of my fleet in the meantime! Will summarize my experiences with brushless motors in another blog shortly for the benefits of others contemplating their use. After restarting the model will resurrect periodic build blogs to advise progress.

Vosper RTTL 2754 by Rex3644 Lieutenant   Posted: 2 days ago
[Score: 10/10] 35"/3000g Vosper RTTL 2754 Capable of 10mph and a runtime of 25mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 30mm) Direct Drive to a 600 brushed (3 Blade) Powered by NiCad (7.2v) 4Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Chinese 320 amp ESC - Comments: Scratch built from plan (Vic Smeed) in the mid 60s by my brother in law I have been aware of this model from the mid 90s sitting on a top shelf in disrepair in his workshop in Wales. Being a reasonable frequent visitor l had looked at the hull of this model and at the end of march on a weekend visit I offered to take the hull and separate deck home with me. I obtained a set of plans off eBay an set about renovating the hull fitting the portholes and keeping as many original bits as possible.Some new deck vents and motor vents were 3d printed by my nephew. The Davits made from plasticard and plastic tubing sadly succumbed to damage during transit so again the 3d printer was put to use deck scuttles an cabin vents were also made Whilst making the super structures and mast I decided to make two of each with the veiw to making a sister vessel but this will be finished in white more on that to follow. 2754 was duly completed ready to return on our summer trip to see family again. We ran the boat on the Teifi estuary to complete a most enjoyable refurbishment and now my great nephew will have the joy of powered model boats having been brought up with yachts both large and small

W1 by jbkiwi Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 6 days ago
This is my scratch built 36" RNZAF British Power Boat 64' HSL (arrived in NZ 1940). I actually went on board this vessel in 1968 when it was still in original form (the RNZAF having disposed of it in the 50s) This vessel is still around and has been recently re modelled (2nd time since early 70s) and I was lucky last year to have met the present owner and go on board (2nd time in 49yrs!)and take a few photos. The vessel was modified a number of times by the RNZAF over the years (air intakes, removal of the fore deck machine guns, wheelhouse turret etc so I sort of went in the middle. I found a few drawings of the type in an old mag which had side and top views plus the bulkheads and their positions, so I took them along to a copying shop and kept enlarging them until I had the desired proportions. This worked out quite well and using a few methods from other models I had built, managed to frame (ply) the hull and then fully strip plank it in balsa. It was then fiber glassed. The deck is ply, lined and varnish stained. The wheelhouse is varnished balsa with the top removable for access. The wheelhouse interior has detail such as controls, instrument panels, skipper, steps to wardroom etc but is not too detailed as it is not seen. The boat has full lighting by remote switch, lights are all LED. The propulsion side has dual everything (motors, ESCs, sound units), would have had 3x but ran out of space! Motors are 28mm 2200Kv water jacketed in-runners (cooled by remotely switched pump) using 30A Chinese ESCs (have 5A BEC, Fwd and Rev). Twin sound units are 'GT Power' car units which have around 40 different sound selections, from Cosworths to diesels and are computer programmable (as well as manually on the unit ) for various functions. I am using one of the v8 sounds (8 cyls short in my application) which I think is as near as you are going to get to 3 Napier Sea Lions (for which there is obviously no sound available) They 'start' 'Idle' and are fully proportional in fwd and rev and can sound quite realistic (will attempt to put up a vid later). Batteries are 2x 2200mah 2s 20c LiPos which will last around 2hrs at least of sailing (they also run the sound units) Still have a few small things left to do (have just made wheelhouse air intakes) but don't want to get too fiddly. Just want to keep it a practical model.

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by pittsfieldpete Lieutenant   Posted: 6 days ago
Hello, Doug: Out of curiosity, did you remove the molded-on plastic ladder rungs from inside of the mast to gain more space for wires? Seeing your finished mast has shown me that it’s best to keep the original nav light locations. Having all 6 lights on the main mast will make it look too cluttered. With all of the lights switched on it’ll look like a light saber is jutting out of the pilot house roof. Do you know if there are standards governing the horizontal spacing of navigation lights? There should be, otherwise I’d think the lights could tend to overlap & look like one big light, especially in fog. BTW, the cables you added to the mast antennas look great. The smooth curve of the cables & the weather boots at the antenna connections add a lot of realism. Well done!👍🏻 Speaking of details, do you know if tugboats carry anchors? If so, what type? As far as I know the US Coast Guard requires every powered vessel to have at least one anchor. I see no reason why tugboats would be exempt from this rule. I’m glad you mentioned using a Tamiya sanding sponge as a means of removing the factory-applied lettering. There’s a model railroad technique I’ve used successfully where an ordinary pencil eraser & window cleaner are used to remove lettering. I’m sure it would work on my boat but I might not live long enough to get it finished. Shortly after I got the boat I ordered a cloth American flag & scale Plimsoll markings from BECC. Sadly BECC has gone out of business. Another good supplier goes around the bowl & down the hole. Sad. Regarding the winch again, your comments tell me that I may have misled you into thinking that my boat has a winch. It doesn’t, but I did say I’m planning to scratchbuild one. In fact, I’m going to sketch one out right after I post this message. Thanks, Pete

BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
Been researching the squeal and stutter on other websites and conclude RFI is probably not the major contributor. Others attribute it to a mismatch in the ESC / motor timing, which seems more likely. Whatever caused it, resulted in the affected motor failing. Which came first, the failure causing squeal or squeal causing failure is open to conjecture. Much to my surprise the manufacturer has decided to replace the motor under warranty. In the meantime, the motors I had planned to use originally (2800kV Outrunners) came into stock, so purchased a couple. Until now have had to use the ESC default settings as did not have a programming card. This also arrived with the motors. Following advice from another contributor reprogrammed the motors with “softer” start and acceleration settings. Fitted and tried the new motors and settings. On the bench, the squeal and stutter have almost gone. The motors are also more tractable. As the brushless motors are now going to be used for high speed operation only, with slow on the centre brushed, thought could simplify the controls by putting the brushless ESCs on one control system using a “Y” lead. However, this introduced inconsistent and erratic motor responses. Reverted to the two previous separate controls, port and starboard. On the water the performance is fine, as is the reliability. The 2S battery gave almost half an hours operation. The bow lifts nicely with both 2 & 3 S Batteries; plenty of spray. Hopefully resembling a 50 knot vessel! Another adjustment is needed to the transom flaps to try to hold the bow down later as she accelerates. Feeling now to finally be making progress with this model. The squeal has not gone, nor has erratic motor operation. The squeal is high pitched screech, rather like treading on a budgie! When it happens, bringing the control back to neutral and advancing it again almost always overcomes it. The erratic operation happens also when starting and is rather like the motors are not getting a signal to react to the control. Again, returning through neutral briefly seems to correct it. The revised motors and ESCs have increased the weight to 6lbs for the hull including all running gear, excluding batteries and superstructure. Whilst still trying to control weight have concluded this figure is satisfactory as the performance certainly is.

PBR - Patrol Boat Riverine by SGray Petty Officer   Posted: 13 days ago
Proboat Alpha - ready to run, model of PBR, Patrol Boat Riverine, used by US Navy during Vietnam conflict, served 1967 -1972. Images show basic detail, 1/18 scale, with crew. Bow gunner servo is linked to rudder. Comes with Navlights, looking forward to a night sail.....some painting added to weather craft, as well as painting radar housing a lighter grey....and the canvas roof over wheel house....a little artistic licence with vessel numbers......Brown Navy did'nt always have numbered vessels....but could'nt help myself. Bravo Zulu Chaps😉

Now Coating and Matting by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
On to Coating and Matting. (as well as sanding!) Now have at least finished all the stripping. Then did the ‘bright light in the hull bit’ to look for areas that needed patching. The major problem area was in the bow and that did not receive the light as it is a totally blanked off compartment. However, it was obvious from the outside anyway so, could I assume it was the only leak? Decided to put a fine matt over the whole hull, not deck, just to be sure of best chance of success. I can imagine what will be said here if it still leaks after all this! I had ordered some supplies ready for the next stage and drew up a plan view of the boat to help think through layout of electrics and other items. Made my usual mistakes about size. Some fittings purchased too small………However, never too large now that’s interesting. Some materials purchased too large. Now have a life’s worth of Resin……(when does it ‘go off’ by?) Also have a lounge floors worth of tissue matting! Also Sandpaper. Now there is a mine field. So now I know a bit more about that and which way the numbers work! When I forgot to put the mask on, I had some of the crispest 'bogies' in years.............. No images posted! On the plus side, although I never wanted to get into this stripping sanding, filling sanding, sealing sanding, matting sanding, painting sanding, painting, sanding bit……………. I now feel I started out with someone’s boat I had bought and now it has become “my boat” for real! I am at the stage now where I have put some filler in and applied the first coat of Eze-Kote from DeLuxe Materials To use Eze-kote read stuff from RNinMunich on this blog or the’ leaking boat’ thread. Washes out of the brushes very easily. There is such as this ..... Youtube link - watch?v=yP05qv3QtUk RNinMunich or Colin H. and the like have bits of extra comment and experience that is always very helpful. BTW, after that finer sanding before first coat, I did the dust down and vacuuming bit but it still felt a bit ‘chalky’ so I gave it a wipe with Methylated Spirits. Now I realise that has water in it, so if anything goes wrong it could be blamed on that................. Having left the first coat to dry I started to cut out the light matt to apply after the next sanding. The matting I have is called Glassfibre Surface Tissue EGlass from FibreGlass Direct. A part of Tricel Composites (NI) Limited. Available internationally in lengths from a metre upwards, it is quite fine in weave so we shall see what happens. I have left quite a wide margin at the moment but may reduce that when I have tried using it! This is another first for me so plenty of room for mistakes............... Will need to cover with the matt in stages as I cannot get around all the boat without changing its position. Going for the bottom of the vessel and stern board first as I figure they are going to be easier than some of the other bits. Then will leave that to cure before moving the boat. Really worried about the joins/overlaps and how well I will cope with those, not to mention the curved bit! Started to look at electrics and layout for a bit of a change. I will post again when I have had the first battles with the matting! TTFN. NPJ

Stern Light by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 days ago
Do we not think that there's a limit to what you can do to a kit that already portrays a vessel inaccurately, before you really are throwing good time after bad? I would think if you want a deadly accurate 93 or 94, make one from scratch, then you will have the correct hull shape as well. Otherwise, it's a nicely put together and finished, once cheapish kit that you're gonna get, despite all the knobs lights and whistles. Just playing Devil's advocate I suppose. Martin

Pilot Boat by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 days ago
looking at the bulkheads I would suggest that the structure is meant to be built upside down on a building board. Each bulkhead should be fastened to a piece of 12mm sq timber then fasten to the base board at the appropriate spacing keeping them upright and square, then the keel can be glued in place followed by the chines keeping all the structure square and true. Just a thought. Ill post a picture of a similar vessel I am building at present in this way, but will be tomorrow.

Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
I also enjoy restorations, Colin...just as much. Every challenge is different. This Chris Craft is a restoration of an Aerokits Sea Urchin that cost me all of 99p. on ebay! But then i thought it would be better made up as a single cockpit smaller runabout, hence the Chris Craft with the steeply tumblehomed stern. My son has an Aerokits PTB and my other son has a Sea Rover. I also have a Sea Urchin and a Veron Veronica yacht, so yes, I do like the restoration of old items. I have a pre War Marblehead in the loft too! I've never been interested in the big ships and service vessels. Only inshore sailing fishing boats and classic speedboats. If I can help you out with any info or techniques, let me know. I have a lot of books on woodies and years as a professional modelmaker to call upon. Cheers, Martin

Pilot launch by Bryan-the-pirate Captain   Posted: 28 days ago
Have just brought this vessel, Well made and light. it is of show quality complete with working navigation lights and blue beacons. Rather fast too

Bustler class tug by wunwinglo Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Marky, Your interest in the Bustler design is correct. I have a relatively basic model of this class of vessel, built my late father and it is a superb runner. Earlier on this year, my partner Maggie spent some time in Liverpool for the Tall Ships rage. We found this example in the Royal Albert dock dry dock. It has been painted in a WW1 dazzle camouflage and modified to serve as a pilot boat.

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by astromorg Seaman   Posted: 2 months ago
Knowing v little about radio waves and antenna construction, I'm happy to accept your line. My assessment was purely on trying to identify the teardrop's purpose and matching its shape to similar units in RAF use. It was usual for ships then - merchant and military - to have a DF system and it just seems logical for a vessel with search and rescue responsibilities to have one! Positioning of nav lights was subject to complex rules in the 1950s and still is! One thing, that I don't think has changed, is that the for'd steaming light must be mounted a significant height above the red/greenside lights. The cabin roof would not be enough! Interesting that we both have similar lengths of experience associated with similar naval vessels. Maybe we crossed paths sometime gone!!

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by astromorg Seaman   Posted: 2 months ago
Interesting, valuable photos and drawings. More like that would be welcomed by many of us. As it would have been illegal not to have a stern light on vessels like these, for both normal passage and also when towing, perhaps that photo without one was during build before it was fitted? No draft marks either. The photo of 93 secured at Vospers (therefore probably before acceptance) shows the stern light while the early type fire monitors also show the date of the photo was early on. I also note one drawing shows the breach hose connectors aft of the cockpit that indicate it to be of later than original build. Similarly the cockpit roof cleats have been re-positioned athwartships rather than the original two being fore-and-aft. Considering their short operational life, it's surprising how many detail changes were made when all the available documentary evidence is studied! You'd think that after 60+ years all the answers would be known for sure by now!