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>> Home > Tags > vessel

vessel
vessel
Hector Read by Gascoigne Commander   Posted: 6 days ago
Thanks for that Marky. Good to think she is still afloat. An engineer who once worked aboard related a hair raising experience he had years ago involving restarting a failed engine during a hazardous attempt to get a line aboard a drifting coaster in heavy seas off Gt Yarmouth. It gives an added interest and life to our models when hearing from seamen who actually worked aboard the real vessel. I am sure there must be many modellers with similar tales.

Thurl pin rack by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
A THOLE pin used in rowing vessel gunnels were literally often Belay/Belaying pins pushed into the thole. Could that be a corruption of the hole maybe?

Juyilanga by Krampus Captain   Posted: 24 days ago
Pictures from this morning's maiden voyage. No problems reported, vessel working great.

Annie by Baggie Admiral   Posted: 25 days ago
Great looking vessel pictured on a lovely day too - great combination!

Fairmount Alpine - TUG! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
Skills look fine to me, nice neat job 👍 Look forward to the 'catch ups' Happy clamping, Doug 😎 Ship pics & info here https://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/details/ships/shipid:25... style='background-color:yellow;'>vessel:FAIRMOUNT_ALPINE or here https://www. style='background-color:yellow;'>vesselfinder.com/vessels/FAIRMOUNT-ALPINE-IMO-9344784-MMSI-245164000 Don't forget the IMO reg number! 9344784 😉

Kiwi\ by Gascoigne Commander   Posted: 27 days ago
Sailing well in the sun and sparkling waters. A NZ Scow scratch built from plans. Unusual trading schooner based on those from the Great Lakes, USA.Actual vessel now restored as an example of an early NZ coastal trader.

"Westbourne" by Baggie Admiral   Posted: 29 days ago
Superb looking vessel....Uber she sails well too

"Westbourne" by ads90 Commander   Posted: 29 days ago
Westbourne is a Port of London Authority steam Tug from the Caldercraft Mini-Fleet Range - it is 1:48 scale. This model was discontinued a few years ago but I did manage to purchase a brand new boxed one via ebay a couple of years ago. During her time Westbourne was hired by the Royal Navy as a rescue tug. She saw service with them between October 1916 and July 1919 in the HM Dockyard. Prior to that she was on general towing service duties on the Thames. She can be found mentioned in “SHIPS OF THE ROYAL NAVY, 1914-1919 - by TYPE & CLASS Section 3. SUPPORT and HARBOUR VESSELS” Following the first world war ‘Westbourne’ was one of three tugs attached to the Port of London Authority (PLA) Dredging Service, they were the "Westbourne", "Thorney" and "Brent", they were all fitted with a drag and under running gear.In 1940 during the Battle of Britain. ‘Westbourne’ and many other tugs were used in assisting the berthing of these large ships that entered the Thames. The photos show from box to construction plus her on the water.

Any clues? by aanside Seaman   Posted: 30 days ago
I have just been given the hull of a sailing vessel. It is broad in the beam, appears to have two masts (it has a massive sail winch inside) and the name "Mysteri" is hand written on two masts. Other than that I haven't a clue Any ideas?

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Most of the deck equipment such as winches and bollards, is standard freighter fare. The deck layout is typical of a vessel of this type and vintage, as are the masts and rigging. There will be little of interest to report until the first water test is planned in about 6 weeks when will get access to an indoor pool.Will hold any further blog updates until then unless something unusual occurs .

MTB by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Rowen, we're not splitting hairs! Together we are getting to the roots👍 I had also noticed the slight differences in superstructure; especially the aft part and the bridge top/screen. But I noticed these variations also in the Danish and other variants. Didn't want to overload the post with these as I thought it was long enough already😲 Seems some variations were introduced depending on the base variant it was ordered as MTB or MGB (most of which still had at least two torpedoes!). Since the Brave class were apparently very expensive to produce (which is why only two were built not the planned six?) the later variants were based on a cheaper export version, 'Felicity' type I think they were called. They were a little smaller but with similar performance and firepower to the Braves, some with two Perseus turbines instead of two but most with three as in the Braves, and cheaper to build with wood on alu frames instead of all metal. Usually classed as FPBs or FACs depending on armament. Summary; The Perkasa was not a generic class but a specific four ship class for the RMN. Basis for the hulls and superstructure design was the same as the Braves and Felicity but some 'poetic license' was taken with subsequent export order with variations even within classes. Comparing available (to me) pics again I now tend to agree with you that the rounded bridge of the model is more like the Perkasa class than the box-like bridge of Swordsman. 😲 BTW: In 1971 the RMN Perkasas were upgraded with SS12 missiles so there's another interesting variant for the aficionados 😉 Credentials: was not in the RAF (but Dad was!), but I worked with the RMN and the Surabaya shipyard (and various other bidders) on the design of the COMMS systems for the replacements for the Perkasa class and then their replacements, up to the current NGPV-2 (New Generation Patrol Vessel-Batch 2). Interesting work and people. Also did some work on their new frigates and an auxiliary in the nineties. One thing I always did before embarking on such projects was to research the background of the navy involved, operational area and requirements and also the potential shipyard partners. Part of establishing confidence and rapport. 😉 Anyway - whatever; model-wise - if it looks right it probably is right! Main thing is fun planning, building and above all sailing, exchanges like this help us all a lot I believe. All the best Doug 😎

Excelsior by Gascoigne Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
[Score: 8/10] 34" Excelsior - Comments: Scratch built model of the last surviving Lowestoft sailing trawler which is managed by a sailing trust. And a much loved vessel. Model sails well with drop keel and rudder extension. 12 years old. Working drawings kindly supplied by the Trust.

HERO by Gascoigne Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
Scratch-built semi-scale from images of a unique vessel used for tug and recovery work on the Norfolk Broads. Was originally steam powered with a fire pump engine,now using diesel. Funnel is hinged to go under low bridges!

The Vosper 46” RAF Crash Tender Kit By Vintage Model Works by Lyle Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Dear Modellers and builders of the Vintage Model Works kit series. You will find my earlier pictures and various writings on the original earlier postings by me in OZ of my still some 30/plus years Crash Boat in which I wore out several I/C motors and my girl still runs in Salt Water at the local LAKE ILLAWARRA in New South Wales and you are somewhat fortunate with ready made fittings. I did not ever know of the "page" ( wish I had a copy ) on your wall of the rear well of fire hose details and fittings , wow what a bonus, as a colonial had several years till Peter Dimberline and I had contact and he helped me to authenticate my vessel. The ESSENTIAL secret of the Crash Boat is the spray rails. So many look toy in the videos and TOOOOOOO fast . The spray rails are doubled at width protruding from the hull and lesser at the point of "rise of the wood " towards the upper bow point. The depth is not too critical at a bit of about an eighth of an inch thickness or a bit thinner for the whole length as you do not want to see a "thick log ", rather again it is the width rather than depth. I know I have written on this before on this webb site in the past. The turns thus on the go become when starting on and STAY more on the go are more flatter rather like a full sized hull which has a planing/ flatter hull turn to the flatness of the water than a typical poorly behaving model boat hull which invariably heels TOOOO much and somewhat digging in , (in turns). The HARD CHINE hull design was meant to not only rise to a comfortable plane attitude but ALSO to turn without that annoying behaviour of "digging in" when it should still perform and exhibit that hard chine design attitude when in a turn . "Digging in" equals water resistance AGAINST the hull and loss of performance and loss of plane attitude and against wave resistance when the hull designers team is trying to maintain hard chine performance in the forward turning direction. I harp on this point that this hull design is one to respect . The older I get the more I expect of all my model machines that I am lucky to see on computers, as we certainly have more need to respect the masters, the likes of Peter Du Cane and T E Lawrence and Hubert Scott Payne of Vospers and Thornycroft and The British Power Boat Company and ELCO and Higgins, all of whom I have researched so much over my life and I have been to the memorial of Lawrence in the desert in Wadi Rum. I try to do it right. Regards to all builders Lyle. My mates and I have to run in 2 to 3 inch chop at times, such is the Lake Channel ! My wife has reminded me that some of my fleet do seem to have BLACK hulls and I only would build one model boat, when I bought the Aerobats Crash Boat home, the pictures are of some of my scratch built fleet.

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Before the funnel could be installed wanted to fit a working radar scanner, navigation lights and the batteries. Decided to use sub C NIMH batteries in plastic holders, they should have the target endurance and provide some ballast. Fitted two sets of 4 cells, one at the forward end of the superstructure and the other at the rear, both at keel level. These were inserted into wooden battery trays to hold them in place. A dry test run showed a full speed motor run time well exceeding the hour target, so will try on water. Also took the opportunity to fit the Rx and then adjust the rudder before finishing off the wiring. Both the navigation lights (LEDs) and the radar scanner work. The radar is driven by a servo with the potentiometer removed and a magnetic drive shaft run up through the superstructure from below the deck. The motor requires about 9 volts to run at what would seem to be something approximating to scale speed; fitted a voltage reducer to allow the lights and the radar to work on less than 6 volts. The mast lights are to be installed in a separate circuit after the masts are added. As I get more into the detail it is evident the GA drawing and the photographs of the vessel in service differ. Fortunately the component locations seem consistent, although the equipment is not. This most apparent in the hold ventilators. The GA shows the standard cowl vents, but the photographs show a mixture between an vertically squeezed oval vent (which am advised is more typically German) and ventilator columns with cylindrical caps. The column style vents with cylindrical caps were easily made from two different sizes of styrene tube with the cap tops made from styrene offcuts. The squeezed oval style vents were more difficult. Broke them down into the major parts of the cylindrical vertical tube and, from a larger tube cut a small ring and filed one end to straddle the tube once it had been squeezed oval. Glued it into place whilst restrained in a small hand vice. Once set, removed and sanded the the two to give a smooth transition, closing the rear aperture off with styrene offcuts. Then resorted to wood filler, filed down to give a smooth, oval vent.