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>> Home > Tags > volts

volts
volts
Seabreacher by canabus Commander   Posted: 6 days ago
Hi Steve The Graupner Speed 900BB Torque specs are 6-40 volts, 6,500 rpm, 54A amps, shaft 6mm, dia. 51.5 mm, length 95mm and weight 645 grams. A brushless motor like the Hobbyking L5055 600kv is 11.1- 22.5 volts(3S -6S) power 1500watts, 55 Amps, shaft 6mm, dia. 50mm, length 55mm and weight 311 grams. On 3S=6660 rpm, 4S=8880 rpm and 6S=13500 rpm. The brushless motors are far more powerful and with an ESC with handles up to 6S(22.5 volts) you would have rpm's to drive a water jet unit. Canabus

battery charging by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
Hi Roy, I like your want for the answers! I have an eagle tree, great bit of kit, but, you are relying on the given info regarding the battery to be correct. As an example, I have an internal resistance meter, I fly planes, so rely on accurate lipo battery info. The "c" rating, and milliamps on most chinese battery stuff is grossly over egged! as are esc ratings and so on. I wouldnt get too hooked on these stats. If the batt is losing a cell, throw it and get another, its not worth the hassle. Overlay that graph with volts, this should correspond to the amp spikes, and if you have a gps then also overlay speed, faster is more amps is quicker volts drop for enjoyment 😲 check out my amp draw on my Huntsman! Paul

What motor have I got? by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
Hi Chris They are all based on 550 motors made by Mabuchi or Johnson. They were GP motors available in different configurations for specific purposes. You can look on data tables to find the exact specs if the motors still have visible markings. The Graupner is designed to run on 8.4volts but the motors can be wound to run on different voltages. I suspect the one with the fan is taken from an electric drill. They used to be popular with the fly boys pre brushless so they are available in large quantities at cheap prices. I suggest you run them with an ammeter connected to a 8.4 (approx) battery and see what current they draw. High current would be good for a fast runaround for 10 mins or so, low current will have more tork and be suitable for a scale cabin cruiser/tug etc. If you have two that draw roughly the same current at the same volts they might be suitable in a twin prop, provided they both rotate at the same speed. Dave

correct size of wiring by octman Commander   Posted: 16 days ago
I apologise if this has already been covered here but I am now at the point of installing the motor in my new model. The motor is a Graupner speed 600, and the specs are : Nominal voltage 8.4 V Operating voltage range 4.8-9,6 V No-load rpm 15500 No-load current drain 1.8 A Current drain at max. efficiency 11 A Current drain when stalled 70 A Max. efficiency without gearbox 75 % If I use 8.4 volts what size wiring do I need? Do I need to cater for the 70A current or the 11A current, or somewhere in between, with a fuse? Sorry to be a bit dim on this but I am confused (with most things these days!) Chris

ESC POWER by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Oh yeh! Every picture tells a story! Had we known that at the beginning we would have missed out on an interesting debate 😉 Looks like you triggered the ESC's thermal cut-out. Lucky it wasn't permanently damaged. MIL Standard 217 Handbook for calculating MTBF (Mean Time Between Failure) lists the two top Stress Factors as Environment - Over-temperature and Exceeding rated Voltage - Over-volts. 🤔 After that comes Component Count - the more parts the more likely it is that one will go PHUT when you need it 😡 During my recently ended career I had a lot to do with MTBF for naval ship systems, and the associated FMECA - Failure Mode Effect And Cause Analysis! Lesson learned!? We all learn from our mistakes and those of others - I hope😉 Have fun with the new ESCs.👍 Don't get any speeding tickets 😉 Cheers Doug 😎 PS having a second power supply in the system more than doubles the MTBF. BTW: Where do you buy your 4.6 cell LiPos !?😲

ESC POWER by RHBaker Admiral   Posted: 19 days ago
First, thanks to all for their helpful replies. To answer a few questions: 1) The installation has two independently controlled ESC/Power train systems in a long, narrow patrol boat. They were fitted for maneuverability and achieve that target well. 2) All Rx functions failed when the ESC failed, pointing to a BEC circuit failure. 3) The ESCs are of UK manufacture and, I hasten to add, have previously worked well. Have used this product for years and am satisfied with it. 4) The presumed reason for failure was, in a effort to increase the performance and reduce the weight of the model the power has (after a series of trials with 9 to 14 v NiMh batteries) gradually evolved to a 17 volt Li-Po system. This final iteration had performed well for some time. Guess using a 12 volt ESC on a 17 volt system would eventually lead to failure - Mea Culpa! Funnily enough,when cooled down all functions work properly - until they heat up again. Have ordered 2 more ESCs from the same manufacturer, but now rated at 12 - 24 volts - should solve the issue. In view of the various recommendations to use a separate Rx power system, think this is the easiest solution to avoid a total system failure in future. Again, thanks for the advice.

Thames River Police Launch by Northumbrian Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 21 days ago
Dave W I hope this helps if not let me know & I will take more pictures i was able to put a high deck in because of the size of the hull it might be difficult to do this with the smaller hull take a look on SLEC they do the River Police Launch (last picture)it appears to to be risen at the front to take the motor etc The Vintage Model Boat range are now being produced by SLEC Ltd. All our kits come with all parts cut by CNC router or laser, plus all the necesary strip wood is included, along with building instructions and plan. The River Police Launch has been based on the old Veron Kit from the 1960's that we all loved at that time. The model is not a scale model but embraces the boat design of that era. The kit is now fully laser cut so all parts are pre-cut and most of the parts are now made out of high quality ply, so obtaining a good finish is easier to achieve. The model can be powered by a 7.2 volts standard buggy battery pack or ic power of .5-1.5 cc engines which is not in the kit, also we have not included any running fittings as we feel a lot of modellers will have or would like to choose for themselves, but we can supply these fittings if required.

battery charging by Trillium Commander   Posted: 26 days ago
Gentlemen, after charging the packs at 100mA for 24 hours, I stripped off the heat shrink from one pack for testing. Unloaded, 4 cells in the pack showed 1.40 volts on my multimeter, with one cell showing 1.37V - near as dammit to 7V for the pack. With a load applied, the current started at 0.95A, dropping to 0.9A when the voltage fell to 1.15. The one cell was consistently the lowest, but never more than ~30mV. From this test I calculated that the capacity used was 2250mAh. Not the rated capacity of 2550mAh, but almost there. During these tests I discovered that the recording meter that I had been relying on for the previous testing was giving inconsistent readings, a fact I only discovered when I started using my multimeter. This possibly resulted in my considering the battery discharged in previous tests, when it was not. Roy

Precedent Huntsman 34" by boaty Commander   Posted: 30 days ago
I like the Precedent Huntsman very much and I built one from the kit many years ago. It was the wooden hull version and it was quite fast with an MFA 850 Torpedo motor running on 12 volts. I sold it in 2004 and now I wish I hadnt. However I bought a 34 inch fibreglass hull this year at the Ellesmere Port show and I wondered if Precedent are still manufacturing kits as I have no plans for the superstructure. Boaty😎

battery charging by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 30 days ago
Hi Roy A NiMh battery when fully charged is 1.4v dropping to 1.2v under load. I use similar batteries for our display boats and they give about 6.8 volts when fully charged. I am assuming your charger is indicating the 1200mAh capacity? I suggest you connect the battery to a meter and place a heavy 1 to 2 amp load on the battery and see what the voltage drops to. If it's less than 6v very quickly I would suspect one of the cells has failed. Usually caused by over discharging the pack and one cell becomes damaged by being reversed charged. If this is a recent purchase I would contact the supplier and ask for help as cells can fail sometimes. If this is not the case then it is possible to split the pack and check each battery whilst under the load. The faulty one's will have a low voltage. Any less than 1v need replacing as they won't ever take or give the full capacity. I have used pins with the meter to check the cells before splitting the pack but it's difficult. I solder a new battery of the same capacity in place and heatshrink the pack. I would check the battery with the replacement cell before sealing as the other cells may be damaged. I am assuming you are using a NiMh charger set to the correct charge current? AA cells are not as resilient as their larger cousins and do not take well to fast charging with loss of capacity being one of the symptoms. Hope this helps and you can get a replacement or repair your packs. Dave

As of Summer 2017... by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
After the sail, I added some hardware to the spars, namely jackstays. I also ordered some aircraft plywood and used it to make new winch drums. These are sized to my current plan of only bracing the tops'l yards. Hopefully, this is the last set I'll have to make. Seeing into the dark interior of the hull can be a pain, more so the brighter it is outside. Mark got some red LEDs to light up the dash of his old pick-up (ute for my Assie friends) and gave me a left-over section. It requires a 12 volt supply (I'm running 6) and red doesn't really help in daylight, but I like the idea. If I can find a white LED strip that'll run on 6 volts, this will definitely get put in. The stern also had folding bulwarks like the bow, but that wrapped all the way around. On the real ship these were replace with a fixed bulwark except for a couple of panels that allowed access to the stern boat. By the time the ship came to Baltimore in 1955, these too were gone, with all their hardware. Again, I'm not making them functional, and decided to built these on the model rather than as separate pieces like on the bow. The hinges are represented inboard by card stock and brass eyes. The barrel portion of the hinges outboard at the bottom of each panel will be a little section of 1/16" wood dowel. The forward bulwarks were epoxied in place and the support rods were installed all around. The tops are raw because they all get a bright cap rail (varnished natural wood) and I'll put that on when it won't get messed up with paint or glue. A friend sent me a box of stuff, among which was a nive little cat face perfect for my catheads. Only having one, I was going to cast a pair in resin. But I'm out of casting resin and epoxy glue didn't set up in a way I liked, so we'll come back to that. The tops'l yards on the ship are hinged iron bands, line with wood staves. I wanted to replicate that functionality not only because that's what the ship has, but because it would allow me to take them off the mast without unrigging half the ship. I cut some heavy copper I use for everything and bent it into two half circles; soldiered brass tubing to the ends, and sawed out the notches with a jewelers saw. If only it had been that easy. Soldiering here tended to un-soldier there, cold soldier joints wouldn't hold. I gave up in frustration. I changed the gun carriages based on some research I did, but I'll post separate entries dealing with them and the ship's boats. I went looking for information on soldiering little things, and took another whack at the parrels. This time it worked out much better. I reused the copper band and brass tubing for the main and made the fore the same way. I still have to make the mizzen tops'l yard parrel, but my soldiering has gotten much much better. Last May ('17) I took the boat to the Baltimore Port Expo for National Maritime Day again, surrounded by members of our newly formed White Rocks Model Boat Club. I didn't manage to get her controls set-up in time, so she didn't go in the pool, but sat on her cart and looked pretty. I put her courses and trys'ls on her for this. The trys'ls won't be used when she sails, but can be set for static displays. The courses will get used, but I'll be able to buntl them up as shown to reduce sail. Also to reduce sail, the t'gallants and royals will be easily removable, or replaceable, as the case may be, depending on what wind there is. That pretty much brings us up to date as of July 2017. I'll post something about the boats and guns in a bit, as well as any other progress that's made. There's far more detail, images, and notes at my website on this, and the other models I'm working on at: http://todd.mainecav.org/model/ There's a few items I skimmed, or skipped over, like her signal flags, that are covered in detail there; like the day she was almost dismasted by the garage door.

Working radar by chippy Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Chugalone Chris Brown used to do a very small motor ideal for radars working on about 1.5 to 3 Volts. You may be able to hide it in the base of the radar bottom piece. I looked on his site but couldn't see them, he usually has them at various shows. give him a phone call for details. http://www.christopher-wyn-brown.co.uk/ Hope this helps. regards Mike

Working radar by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi chugalone100 It would appear you have already worked out that some sort of pulley may be an option. Angled small gears may also work but there may not be the space available and you would probably need to make your own. I did buy from http://www.gizmoszone.com/ some very small (6mm) planetary geared motors that run on 3volts and are certainly suitable for your purpose via a pulley system. Using 1.5 volts gave a very realistic speed. Using one of these motors should allow you to use two small pulleys on the mast, where I suspect space will be limited. I would make sure you will always have access to the pulleys and belts as they will almost certainly need servicing over time. Hope this helps and please post details of the setup. Dave

No power by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Nick, don't get upset, just slow down and try to be a little more accurate for us. Above all don't just plunge in with 'wild' experiments if you're not sure of the way forward. We are happy to help, and your problems are not insignificant, we all have some as we get older, but there's not much we can do if it is already too late due to 'wild' experiments🤔 Dave may well be right, after all this trial and error you may need to charge the battery again. That's why I asked if you have a simple voltmeter; a) to check the battery volts and b) if it is getting to the RX. Basic test engineering; #1: if it don't work has the circuit got volts? #2: If not why not ?? So, can you check the battery voltage please? Cheers Doug PS if possible (budget / 'er indoors or whatever) I can strongly recommend a simple cheap variable power supply to power such tests instead of having to rely on the battery from the boat. Let us know when you have the new battery and are charged up ready to go again. 👍😉

Flickering LED by EAGLE Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Sorry the volts are 2.4. Dave