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>> Home > Tags > wanted

wanted
wanted
basic submarine commission build wanted by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
I need a sub! tried it many times and failed. All I want is a dorsal fin, and tail fin to resemble a shark, and the top of the hull/body. Needs to be 18 inches or so. I want it to submerse to dorsal fin depth, forwards, left and right. I have am mmb subsonic hull, an auto leveller, the tx and rx, just cant sort it. (some pics attached) Anybody have something to sell, or want a commission build? Thanks Paul

Decks by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
Hi Norm, Norm (!) Oughs drawing may well be 'as built'. During the war she received many mods. Depends on the time snapshot you want to recreate. I may be wrong about the island (photo perspective) but it seemed that way. I remember standing on the topmost island deck of a Colossus class carrier, at the foot of the antenna mast, looking down at ants crawling about on the deck, and the even smaller ones on the dockside! 😉 I was up there inspecting the COMMS antenna fit. That was my job the last 30 odd years. On existing ships I would survey the COMMS systems for upgrades and refits. For new build ships I would discuss the requirements and possibilities with the navies and then discuss with the shipyards how to achieve them! All good stuff, but the last 10 years I was getting a bit stiff for the climbing, so I sent a younger colleague up while I discussed the existing system and any problems with the crew in the Wardroom😉 Can't see your pic, the site only accepts jpgs etc🤔 An irritation that has often cost me time to do conversions 😡 We'll have to 'gang up' on Fireboat (Stephen) to get this improved. i often wanted to upload a pdf page, but had to convert to jpg etc first😭 Where is this mysterious platform? Maybe I can find it. A large searchlight would not surprise me. Could also be an early radar antenna, need to research the types mentioned above. If the launch has a cabin it may be an 'Admirals Barge', and Admirals had a lot of freedom to paint them how they wanted. So black and mahogany sounds very appropriate to me 👍 Often said on this site (and elsewhere) but: 'The only silly question is the one you don't ask'! Keep up the good work, Doug 😎

Gluing by drspock Petty Officer   Posted: 6 days ago
We all use different types of glue for varying jobs. I just wanted to share this,because it is so good. For jobs not under too much stress,I use Bond-it high viscosity superglue; (very good gap filling),time to adjust the work! When in place,hold it and spray with Soudal superglue activator; anywhere in the area of the joint! That joint is immediately solid; you will not shift it!

Help wanted by AllenA Commander   Posted: 6 days ago
Hi Colin, This is what you might call a delayed response.....I always have been a little slow. About 3 years ago you posted your latest project which was to be something like the Great Eastern. While flipping through the Model Engineer Christmas Edition December 1958 I found this article. Probably too late but I thought you might like to see it. Did you ever finish the restoration?

huntsman plan by Black Dog Jack Seaman   Posted: 7 days ago
Model Boats magazine January 2016 ncluded a free plan of a Huntsman 31 complete with photos and a step by step build guide. Unfortunately the model is 24". I also wanted a bigger model so I redrew the plan double size. It wasn't too difficult and only took a couple of evenings with a some lining paper from B&Q and a calculator and voila! At the moment I am planking the roof of the cabins and trying to decide between a brushless motor and an old Weston rare earth brushed motor I used to use for fast electrics. The article in MB also ran into February 2016 where all the fiddly finishing bits were described, also with many photos. I expect one can obtain back issues from their web site. Anyone interested in Huntsmen should get these two issues for the detail alone.

Deck furniture by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Oddly that is the response I now get (Google or Yahoo secure) ! Router / Browser / Cache / Google memory !? Curiously MacAffee Web Adviser lists all their links as 'Suspicious', 'Non existent URL' and 'PUP' (Potentially Unwanted Programme) !!?? I have advised them of the truth and asked them to re-check and re-classify. Cheers Doug 😎 PS now going off-air while I learn to programme the new RC set! 😉 Wish me luck!

Firing Battleship at Wings & Wheels (UltraHD/4K) by boaty Commander   Posted: 16 days ago
This brings back memories to when I was a 7 year old in 1959. During the family holiday in Scarborough we visited Peas Holme Park and there was some action on the boating lake. It appeared to be an enactment of the Battle of the Atlantic with some very large models of ships of the era shooting it out. I recall that some of boats these sank and I have a vivid memory of a merchant vessel being shelled with flares being set off on the deck to simulate a direct hit. Does anyone have details, ie did the ships have a person on board or where they radio controlled and I also noted some wires above the lake which dive bombers ran along with imitation bombs Does this event still take place as I know that at one time persons wanted to stop it due to Germany now being one of our NATO allies. Boaty😎

Turbine boat by lesliebreame Lieutenant   Posted: 20 days ago
Unfortunately all my designs are in the old brain box and sketches made on an A4 note pad drawn in the pub.However if there was anything that you wanted in particular im sure i could fix it. I have 6 builds on the go at the moment but all the designs are in my head or copies of what i have already.Regards

Turbine boat by lesliebreame Lieutenant   Posted: 20 days ago
In old money Edward it is 28" long and weighs 11lb , full with water. Its a bit on the heavy side of course but then i am more interested in the working and making of the thing and the individual components rather than blistering speed. If i wanted that i would use a brushless motor and modern batteries! Each to his own. What do you make ? Les Breame

Sea Queen refurbishment by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Hi Dave, very interesting and useful but not all we (I) wanted to know! The main question was / is the viscosity "how runny"! We are not talking about laying up forms here but coating the hull inside by pouring. Think I'll just use Ezekote (just found a dealer in Germany👍) or diluted yacht varnish 😉 Can buy this down the road at the Baumarkt 👍 cheers Doug 😎

kyosho wanted by 2shaws Seaman   Posted: 1 month ago
I'm looking for a kyosho wave chopper either ready built or in kit form. Any info would be appreciated. Contact [Email Removed, PM Only]

The electrics, drive & radio by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi robhenry Thank you for your complimentary remarks. I didn't really consider building the boat with twin motors and rudders as I wanted to build the kit 'out of the box' to a great extent and also because I was rediscovering the hobby and all of the new technology and techniques that it now benefits from. With the experience I and knowledge that I have now gained I would be not so hesitant to consider such things. I'm grateful for your contribution to Mike's data on the RAF boats as it will have no doubt filtered down to the benefit of my boat build. As I have discovered, surprisingly little information on these boats exists or has been made public despite their popularity with model builders and it would be a great thing if everyone were to pool their knowledge and resources to try and redress this situation. I will certainly try to photograph the boat in action if I can manage the controls and a camera at the same time 😁 Rob.

copper boiler by lesliebreame Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
there are 2 domes. the former you can see is for the firebox dome . Ibeat the copper over the former with a mallet because spinning 3mm copper even when annealed is very difficult for an amateur who doesnt have very powerful lathe. However i did spin it when finished to take out the wrinkles.!! I had to anneal it about 40 times !!!! Same with the top dome , which was slightly easier because it has no flange at the bottom. The 2 pictures are different boilers, the left one has no domes as i wanted to make it quickly. The flue is the fire hole as well and the boiler is the same design as in my experimental coal fired outboard turbine boat which you can view on VIDEO GALLERY. Scroll down till you find it. Regards Les

As of Summer 2017... by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
After the sail, I added some hardware to the spars, namely jackstays. I also ordered some aircraft plywood and used it to make new winch drums. These are sized to my current plan of only bracing the tops'l yards. Hopefully, this is the last set I'll have to make. Seeing into the dark interior of the hull can be a pain, more so the brighter it is outside. Mark got some red LEDs to light up the dash of his old pick-up (ute for my Assie friends) and gave me a left-over section. It requires a 12 volt supply (I'm running 6) and red doesn't really help in daylight, but I like the idea. If I can find a white LED strip that'll run on 6 volts, this will definitely get put in. The stern also had folding bulwarks like the bow, but that wrapped all the way around. On the real ship these were replace with a fixed bulwark except for a couple of panels that allowed access to the stern boat. By the time the ship came to Baltimore in 1955, these too were gone, with all their hardware. Again, I'm not making them functional, and decided to built these on the model rather than as separate pieces like on the bow. The hinges are represented inboard by card stock and brass eyes. The barrel portion of the hinges outboard at the bottom of each panel will be a little section of 1/16" wood dowel. The forward bulwarks were epoxied in place and the support rods were installed all around. The tops are raw because they all get a bright cap rail (varnished natural wood) and I'll put that on when it won't get messed up with paint or glue. A friend sent me a box of stuff, among which was a nive little cat face perfect for my catheads. Only having one, I was going to cast a pair in resin. But I'm out of casting resin and epoxy glue didn't set up in a way I liked, so we'll come back to that. The tops'l yards on the ship are hinged iron bands, line with wood staves. I wanted to replicate that functionality not only because that's what the ship has, but because it would allow me to take them off the mast without unrigging half the ship. I cut some heavy copper I use for everything and bent it into two half circles; soldiered brass tubing to the ends, and sawed out the notches with a jewelers saw. If only it had been that easy. Soldiering here tended to un-soldier there, cold soldier joints wouldn't hold. I gave up in frustration. I changed the gun carriages based on some research I did, but I'll post separate entries dealing with them and the ship's boats. I went looking for information on soldiering little things, and took another whack at the parrels. This time it worked out much better. I reused the copper band and brass tubing for the main and made the fore the same way. I still have to make the mizzen tops'l yard parrel, but my soldiering has gotten much much better. Last May ('17) I took the boat to the Baltimore Port Expo for National Maritime Day again, surrounded by members of our newly formed White Rocks Model Boat Club. I didn't manage to get her controls set-up in time, so she didn't go in the pool, but sat on her cart and looked pretty. I put her courses and trys'ls on her for this. The trys'ls won't be used when she sails, but can be set for static displays. The courses will get used, but I'll be able to buntl them up as shown to reduce sail. Also to reduce sail, the t'gallants and royals will be easily removable, or replaceable, as the case may be, depending on what wind there is. That pretty much brings us up to date as of July 2017. I'll post something about the boats and guns in a bit, as well as any other progress that's made. There's far more detail, images, and notes at my website on this, and the other models I'm working on at: http://todd.mainecav.org/model/ There's a few items I skimmed, or skipped over, like her signal flags, that are covered in detail there; like the day she was almost dismasted by the garage door.

First REAL Sail in Open Water by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
I wanted to use separate controls for fore and main+mizzen, but my "new" winch drums where crap, and I only had one drum, the wood disc and cardboard one I've been using. So, I linked all three masts together. It was very near the end of October, but the forecast was for light breezes and mid to high 50's (about 13°c). I rigged her royals for the first time, ran all the bracing through the tops'l yards instead of the courses. I redid the bracing plan to only use tops'l yard braces instead of both tops'l yards and courses. This simplifies everything, and hopefully it would be enough. I had a list of specific items to test, so based on that list, here's a report on the first time Constellation really sailed, under full control, in open water: First off, she was sailed in Rock Creek in Maryland USA. My friend Mark has access to the neighborhood boat-ramp three blocks down the street. He brought his "Son of Erin" along, rigged as a sloop (it's convertible) and his grand-kids who also lived nearby. So... 1. Test fit in car; she hasn't been in my Toyota Matrix yet. -It was tricky at first, but it worked. None or nothing else is getting in the car, so this isn't the preferred transport by any means - but it's nice to know it's there. Note in the photo, in the car on the left is the launch cart with the wheels removed, packed in nice and neat. 2. Test the new launch cart. -As noted, it broke down and packed away really nicely. The approach to the ramp was very steep, and I took her down head first so she wouldn't slide off the back of the cart. The bumpy ground made the model slide back a lot. I'm going to put a stop in the channel that will catch the edge of the PVC cap and should fix that problem. There's was also a lot of slop in the flag pole bracket, the hole for the bolt that holds the two parts is bigger than the bolt, making for too play in the handle. I replaces it with another pole bracket that fit more snugly. The wheels are hard and a bit jarring, especially on the ramp where there was broken concrete underwater so cars wouldn't sink into the silt. The handle was the bigger problem though, slopping up and down and flexing. Otherwise the cart performed as expected and I was really pleased with it. When I used it to one side of the ramp where there was hard sand, I had no problems at all. 3. With the royals set, she'll be sailing with the most sail so far. -The forecast was for Northerly winds up to 5 mph. Up in the creek that was variable in direction and speed, gusting at least to 15 now and then, sometimes from two directions! The model took it all very well, though my heart beat faster every time she heeled, I don't think she once got her gun-stripe wet. 4. Test fore tops'l yard brace routing. -No problems at all, everything worked are designed, for a change. 5. See how self-tending bowlines rigged on the main tops'l work out. -They seemed to function just fine. When the model was close enough to see them, they didn't snag or interfere with the sail or bracing. 6. Actually sail the model in open water instead of bumping the bottom in a shallow pool. -A combination of joy and terror. Every gust my heart raced, but she sailed great and went where I meant her to go from the beginning. 7. Get some pictures and video of the model sailing. -One thing that went wrong was my camera's batteries dying, so I didn't get all the pics and video I wanted. Fortunately, Mark was on hand and took some shots and video with his phone. In all, the day was a resounding success. Everything went well, nothing broke or failed. And she sailed! Not like her first sail where she barely made head way for more than a few seconds, but controllably, reliably, and fast too! I handled her by myself. Mark was there and offered his help, but part of my test was seeing if I could deal with it all 100% by myself. No problems. The awkward bit was sitting her on her ballast and lining the rods with their holes without her falling off. That's something I need to work out, otherwise no part of loading, unloading, launching, retrieving, etc, was more than one person could handle. In the end, what I though would work out back in 1999 did. Here's 16 minutes of that day's sailing... https://youtu.be/80b2au24rFQ