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>> Home > Tags > water line

water line
hmafv stirling
36 rater model yacht
ahc waterson b444
salt water
water cooled
water jacket
water proofing
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water line
Let’s get some paint on! by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
Hi Doug, the lettering is vinyl of ebay, the red and white waterline stripes are vinyl trimline (car body trim)

A little progress... by Smiffy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 days ago
Slow progress recently, partly due to snow(!) but also because I have had some engineering to catch up on. Anyway, I have cut and fitted but not completed shaping the bow and stern blocks, fitted the prop shaft and fabricated the rudder assembly. This was silver soldered using a little piece of 3mm silver steel and sheet and channel brass. Yes, the keel looks a bit of a mess in this area but I am going to cover the ply with mahogany veneer to match the planking when I have completed that, and of course it will all be painted below the water-line. I also made a rough cradle to keep the boat steady while working on it - to be replaced with a posh one when everything is done!

Cabin Sides Glued in Place! by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Yes, the Jersey City is a smooth sailing tug! I have mine low in the water. She grabs the water and doesn't lean as much! If she was at the water line dumas recommends she'll lean port or Starboard! Do you have the Brooklyn?

The Saga of the Cabin Roof or - Arrrgh! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Typical of Aeorokits the cabin roof skin was made of two thin pieces of ply < 1mm. Over the 50 years or so the overhang corners had started to curl up and crack 😲 Pics 1 & 2 show the 'off the shelf' condition after 25 years of neglect 🤔. First I tried to correct this by soaking in hot water and flattening under a car battery (flattens most things😉). So far so good. Then some super glue in the cracks and back under the battery. After a day or two it just curled up again. Ho hum! Pour a glass of wine and back to the thinking board. Seconds Out - Round Two! Thought, OK make new pieces from the 0.6mm ply I still have and paint it - then my eye fell on some 1mm mahogany sheet (Ouch 😭). Tried to make the whole roof skin in one piece of this but the compound curve defeated me. The skin was steamed and soaked in hot water and clamped across the roof frame. Next morning - Arrrgh! Had started to crack along the centre line 😭 More thinks!! Carefully cut down the middle and glued and clamped the separate pieces; pics 3&4. Getting the two pieces to match in the middle was a tedious ***!!! Pic 5. Then mucho sanding. followed by 2 coats of Lord Nelson sealer, sand back with 600 grit sanding sponge. Then two coats of Lord Nelson matt varnish, sanding with 1000 grit in between. then two coats of Lord Nelson gloss varnish, sanding with 2000 grit in between. Pic 6. So far so good, pic 6. 3rd coat of varnish and - Arrrgh 2! 😡 Pic 7. No idea why! Sand off and start again, pic 8 😭 Treated each side separately, pics 9 & 10 and flatted off with 2000 grit. Then applied three coats of clear protective lacquer, sanding with 3000 grit between coats. Finally cutting back with auto paint restorer / cutting polish and finally polishing with anti-hologram finishing polish. Pic 11. Now I'm happy 😊 Pic 12. Only took a week 😉 Next week in this theatre - "I love you too Flash but we've only got 15 minutes to save the world"! or 'Will I ever get this hull finished?" 😎

Command Boat 90 by CB90 Lieutenant   Posted: 11 days ago
Scratch built at 12th scale from pictures and profiles of the internet. The boat was originally built in Sweden a class of fast military assault craft originally developed for the Swedish Navy by Dockstavarvet Speed: 40 knots (74 km/h) Draught: 0.8 m (2 ft 7 in) Length: 15.9 m (52 ft) Overall; 14.9 (48') Complement: 3 (two officers and one engineer); Up to 21 amphibious troops with full equipment Armament: 3 × Browning M2HB machine guns; 1 × Mk 19 grenade launcher; 4 naval mines or 6 depth charges . The Model I was attracted to this boat due to its great performance and maneuverability, this was mainly due to the use of twin water jets as the main propulsion, this is a trade off with efficiency. So my start point was to collect as much information as possible about the boat this involved collecting pictures and profiles of the craft from various sources. Eventually I found some plans of sort :- My Dad was a boat builder in the days of wooden yachts, and had showed me how to make plans and frames from a line drawing. I went about this first by creating a prototype about 24 in long out of light ply. I then created full size plans of the model to be made. Pictures of small prototype finally painted plain green. The Main model Used my computer to print out the frames onto paper, cut them out and used them as templates for the ply ribs. The construction was simple chine style, with 1.5 mm ply. I tried to build jet drives but failed to produce a effective unit. So reverted to propshafts which worked out well with better control and the bot can spin on it own axis by putting one engine in reverse the other in forward and adjusting the twin rudders. That it for now, hope it was of some interest

Vintage Aero Kit Crash Tender by CB90 Lieutenant   Posted: 13 days ago
Brought this vintage Aero Kits RAF Crash Tender for £50 from Newcastle area, it is the 34in version. To my surprise at home I found that it had a Bullet 30 motor installed these motors were the top drawer motor of early fast electrics and its the only one I've ever seen, it can run on 24v and pull around 15A giving 300w not bad for a brushed motor. due to the power of this motor I have modified the hull under the water line with turn fins and trim tabs to reduce torque roll and improve turning stability, the underside is incorrect already as it only has one propshaft, where the original had two and I believe that both props turned in the same direction. The Pictures here show some of the work in progress I have remounted the motor and added a speed controller rated at 24v I have remade the stern compartment and rudder gear under it. I have blocked windows and foamed the front half of the boat. made missing parts and repaired delaminating ply. Note old ply is not as good as modern, the glue is not as water resistant. Have painted the hull and have just ordered the decals from Cornwall model Boats :- The 34in is 1/16 scale Fitting can be brought but many are cast white metal and can add weight to the boat, I have made two water cannons and plan to buy plastic fittings from this site. This has turned out to be a task that is difficult to assess how much effort and money to spend on a hull that has been built by someone else (say no more). Have just finished the steps for the stern compartment.

CB90 by CB90 Lieutenant   Posted: 15 days ago
[Score: 7/10] 52"/5000g CB90 Capable of 8mph and a runtime of 25mins Twin Propellors (3 Blade 45mm) Direct Drive to a Graupner 700 Turbos (3 Blade) Powered by NiCad (8.4v) 4Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Mtroniks (25Amps) ESC - Comments: Scratch built at 12th scale from pictures and profiles of the original boat, hope to upgrade batteries to 11.1v lipo. The boat was originally built in Sweden a class of fast military assault craft originally developed for the Swedish Navy by Dockstavarvet The CB90 is an exceptionally fast and agile boat. Speed: 40 knots (74 km/h) Draught: 0.8 m (2 ft 7 in) Length: 15.9 m (52 ft) Overall; 14.9 (48') Waterline Builders: Dockstavarvet, Gotlandsvarvet In commission: 1991 Complement: 3 (two officers and one engineer); Up to 21 amphibious troops with full equipment Armament: 3 × Browning M2HB machine guns; 1 × Mk 19 grenade launcher; 4 naval mines or 6 depth charges

Education by Smiffy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 19 days ago
And I have just remembered after posting the above that the waterline models were 1/1200 scale. I am sure I will be corrected in any case! What a strange thing the brain is.... Smiffy

Education by Smiffy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 19 days ago
We hear a lot these days about encouraging the younger generation into pastimes such as model boats and model engineering and probably these issues have always been a topic for gloomy discussion. The very fact that we are still at it probably gives the lie to the gloomiest predictions. Anyway, this train of thought was brought about by a discovery in a dark corner of my workshop: Many years ago (in a different life) I was involved in primary education and following a BBC schools tv series on Nelson and naval history the class project developed into one about ships and all things naval. One group was fascinated by sailing ships after we had visited both HMS Victory and the Mary Rose ( still lying on her side then) and inspired by some drawings of different rigs in a Model Boats Scale Special they made some simple models to illustrate them. This is what I found, along with an Airfix HMS Manxman and two of those superb 1/700 (?) waterline models, of HMS Hood and the Bismarck, these three made by me to add to the display. These pictures show all these items which have survived years tucked away among the junk in the garage! The sail models were simply made with balsa, dowel, cotton and cartridge paper for sails, and some had even started to acquire rigging and staysails before the term ended. This all happened many years ago and I have been retired from teaching for 20 years, but I can still remember the names of all the different rigs, despite never having been a sailor - I hope it inspired some of the class into modelling, if not getting involved in the real thing. Smiffy

Bulwark supports by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
The deck and bulwarks were given another coat of paint, after this had dried the wash ports and rope hawsers were masked off and the hull given two coats of red primer, the water line was marked using a pencil on a block of wood, bottom part of the hull masked off and the top part given two coats of satin black. Starting to look like a boat now. The rope crate was made out of plasticard to be a good tight fit on the coaming. The bulwark positions were marked with pencil on the top of the bulwark. After cutting them all out of plasticard, each one was sanded to fit it's position, then keeping them in order and sticking them to upside down masking tape they were sprayed with paint. All the supports were glued into position with super glue, a toothpick and my best glasses.

Prop shaft by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
I make my own prop shafts. If you do use steel bar you will need to service the shaft frequently as it will rust inside the proptube. The real problem is the rust may damage the bearing when you remove it to clean. If I can I use 316 marine grade stainless as it is more resistant to rust in salt environments. 303 grade will work but in my experience shows signs of rust over time, especially if your water is saline. I have used phosphor bronze but you do need to check the specs as suggested above. Some can be exceptionally hard and may cause wear to the shaft. Acetyl is very good but it comes in two variants and I have found Delrin to be more resilient and just as easy to machine. You can read details of the two types at We actually used a type of white Nylon on our six club model tugs which have been running since 2007 at shows where we give the public a chance to have a go. Some of the motors have required replacing but the bearings are as good today as when first installed.

Too Powerful Brushless ? by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Graham and Haig The max current is the Max Watts divided by the Battery Voltage. Most motors reach their max efficiency at much lower value, typically about 77%. You need to take care when interpreting the data especially when the description has been translated from a foreign language. The Eco range of motors were developed for model boats and in general were high tork, low revving and low current. They were also designed to work at lower voltages so that would explain the lower Wattage. I would only use the nominal voltage, Kv and max Watts figures. The amps appears to be the stall current but I am guessing. Also we don't know the voltage at which the stall current was measured. Providing you don't exceed the rated voltage and wattage your motor should be OK. I suspect running much above half the rated wattage may require some water cooling. There are many Wattmeters available that will measure the wattage, amps etc at reasonable prices and if you connect in line with your battery and ESC whilst holding the model in the water you will have a good indication of the max current / watts at full bore. This should be ideally about half the max rating (watts & amps) for both the motor and ESC. Reducing the prop size will reduce the load.

Marblehead Sailboat upgraded by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Ron The switch is designed for internal usage. The rubber boot does provide some protection but at the end of the day you have an electrical switch that will be subjected to electrical reaction between the copper, metal case and water (saline will react very quickly). The slightest damp usually results in the copper in the black wire and whatever it is connected to going black. It no longer works as a conductor and has to be replaced in total. You could mount the switch in side the cabin and use a short length of wire to push pull from outside. Some slide switches have a hole in the switch knob for this purpose. We often used this with model aircraft and it works well with model boats. Doug's solution may help delay the process but the end result is inevitable and in my experience the black wire syndrome usually manifests itself when the model is sailing.

The Vosper 46” RAF Crash Tender Kit By Vintage Model Works by Lyle Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Dear Modellers and builders of the Vintage Model Works kit series. You will find my earlier pictures and various writings on the original earlier postings by me in OZ of my still some 30/plus years Crash Boat in which I wore out several I/C motors and my girl still runs in Salt Water at the local LAKE ILLAWARRA in New South Wales and you are somewhat fortunate with ready made fittings. I did not ever know of the "page" ( wish I had a copy ) on your wall of the rear well of fire hose details and fittings , wow what a bonus, as a colonial had several years till Peter Dimberline and I had contact and he helped me to authenticate my vessel. The ESSENTIAL secret of the Crash Boat is the spray rails. So many look toy in the videos and TOOOOOOO fast . The spray rails are doubled at width protruding from the hull and lesser at the point of "rise of the wood " towards the upper bow point. The depth is not too critical at a bit of about an eighth of an inch thickness or a bit thinner for the whole length as you do not want to see a "thick log ", rather again it is the width rather than depth. I know I have written on this before on this webb site in the past. The turns thus on the go become when starting on and STAY more on the go are more flatter rather like a full sized hull which has a planing/ flatter hull turn to the flatness of the water than a typical poorly behaving model boat hull which invariably heels TOOOO much and somewhat digging in , (in turns). The HARD CHINE hull design was meant to not only rise to a comfortable plane attitude but ALSO to turn without that annoying behaviour of "digging in" when it should still perform and exhibit that hard chine design attitude when in a turn . "Digging in" equals water resistance AGAINST the hull and loss of performance and loss of plane attitude and against wave resistance when the hull designers team is trying to maintain hard chine performance in the forward turning direction. I harp on this point that this hull design is one to respect . The older I get the more I expect of all my model machines that I am lucky to see on computers, as we certainly have more need to respect the masters, the likes of Peter Du Cane and T E Lawrence and Hubert Scott Payne of Vospers and Thornycroft and The British Power Boat Company and ELCO and Higgins, all of whom I have researched so much over my life and I have been to the memorial of Lawrence in the desert in Wadi Rum. I try to do it right. Regards to all builders Lyle. My mates and I have to run in 2 to 3 inch chop at times, such is the Lake Channel ! My wife has reminded me that some of my fleet do seem to have BLACK hulls and I only would build one model boat, when I bought the Aerobats Crash Boat home, the pictures are of some of my scratch built fleet.

Getting the ballast correct by Ron Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Dave I did as suggested. The water line on the plan is for a pond boat or shelf model, so having placed four AA batteries in it the water line changed by 1/8” . I think if I am careful about the size of sail put on it, I should be able to see it on the pond in the Spring.