Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
June 2017: 7 people
May 2017: 8 people
April 2017: 23 people
March 2017: 9 people
February 2017: 12 people
January 2017: 37 people
December 2016: 2 people
November 2016: 2 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (26)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > water line

water line
speedline
waterline
hmafv stirling
36 rater model yacht
ahc waterson b444
blackwater
salt water
water cooled
water jacket
water proofing
water pump
waterproof
water line
Just Keep Swimming by Jerry Todd Lieutenant   Posted: 21 hours ago
The maritime museum's event, scheduled for October instead of May, was cancelled as a hurricane blew up the coast and pushed water up the bay flooding a lot of coastal bay towns like St Michaels. I couldn't make the next Port Expo in 2016, but I tried to be ready for the maritime museum in October. I started making the forward bulwarks. The real ship had sections that folded down on bronze hinges a few of which still exist as she still had her forward bulwarks when she came to Baltimore. They could also be removed. I mad all the section as a single piece and I don't intend to make them functional, just something to snag and need to be repaired. As mentioned, the original winch drums warped and I made new ones with styrene drums instead of wood. These vanished around the time I moved and haven't been found yet, so I got some sheet plastic to take the place of the CDs and made a new pair. I have to say, I'm not happy with these at all. I did add a small block of Delrin to each winch to brace the drums against the pull of the braces/springs. Constellation's board at her entry port were carved. I took a photo of an original at the ship and traced it in PaintShopPro. Scaled it to the model and printed it. I glued this to some bass wood. I have some mahogany I can slice some thing slabs off of, and I may try using a rotary tool to carve a set for real, but till then, these will do. I tried to make the tops'l yard parrels which are iron hoops lined with wood. There's a pin for the yard's yoke to ride on, and the hoop can be opened and hinged to be removed. I wanted all that in case I need to remove a yard at some point without pulling down the whole rig. I tried it with some sheet brass, and again, I wasn't too hgappy with the result. We'll come back to that. So, I fiddled around with cutting combs to make hatch gratings, and actually managed to get something done, which led to making the main hatch cover. I had cut a bit of plywood as a cover, just to keep dust from going below while I was working - I based my hatch cover on this piece, framed the bottom; installed ledged for it to sit on inside the hatch coaming, and made gratings and fake beams on top. It's a bit simplified buy what the ship actually had, but it gets the point across. A couple of smaller gratings also got installed giving the deck a more finished appearance. I wasn't thrilled at bumping the bottom of a pool again, but the maritime museum is on the Miles River. I needed to be able to launch and retrieve the model at a boat-ramp or shore, so I started designing a launch-cart....

Building a deck by Jerry Todd Lieutenant   Posted: 3 days ago
I began laying the deck on April 5th. It had snowed as recently as the week before, but it finally warmed up enough to use glue. The strips were cut to 6-5/8" length, about 20' in 1:36 scale. I used a black marker on two opposite sides to represent the pitch in the seams. The deck was laid in a 5-plank pattern to mix up the butt-joints as much as I could. My research on her decking found she's had various styles and plank widths over her life. The earliest photo showing her deck that I could find, showed it straight planked with 7 or 8" wide boards based on the number of planks between her waterway and the main hatch coaming. Her waterway logs seem to be placed ON the decking, as there's no margin planks or joggling - even today. The planking was set with gel CA. Gorilla sells it in a nice bottle with a metal pin in the cap to keep the spout open. It would up taking 3 of these bottles to complete the deck. The planks are cut at a 45 on the ends along the fore and aft access hatches, to try and hide this seam as much as possible. Once the deck was down, I scraped it. The glue is more resistant than the basswood is, so sanding would have scalloped the wood between seams. Scraping makes everything level. Some lite sanding, more to polish than remove anything, was done last. I had planned to stain the deck a very light grayish tint, but an active naval vessel gets holy-stoned regularly and wouldn't be gray as the ships that sit at a dock today are. In all it took 455 pieces to complete the deck and there wasn't any scrap longer than 1 inch left over. In all I have 3/4" deck beams, 1/4" plywood, a layer of 4oz cloth and resin, and a 3/16" basswood deck - I don't recall why I designed it so heavy, but it certainly doesn't hurt the model at all, and I think the 3/16" square strip will prove to have been easier to set than the 1/16" x 1/4" planks Pride and Macedonian will get. The deck go a coat of water-based satin poly, and I stared working on hatch coamings, cap log, and waterways. The cabin skylight and two hatched forward of it, including the capstan, and all combined into one hatch where the battery is accessed, and which hides the aft ballast rod and main power switch. The cap logs Are 1/2" wide x 1/4" tall basswood that was tren'led, glued, and copper nailed, onto the deck, flush with the outside of the hull covering this seam completely. The the angled wood waterways were installed around the inside of the cap log, and the deck got a coat of oil-based satin poly. This actually leeched in and made the marker seams bleed a little. In hind sight, I think I'll go with paint over marker for seams in the future. The coamings got painted black. I'm not sure why the Navy painted deck fittings black. It was even common to paint to top surfaces of tops black. I wonder how many injuries and losses this cost the navy that white paint would have prevented. Anyway... Constellation didn't have "solid" bulwarks, but rather she had hammock irons bolted to her cap log. These were removed when Baltimore tried to pass her off as a frigate and tossed in the bilge. When the ship was restored as a sloop of war, they found all but one. These irons are designed to have wooden rails at their tops, inboard and out, and have holes so several lines can be run through them. The Navy in it's wisdom though, decided to wainscot them to appear as solid bulwarks, despite the additional splinter hazard that would be in battle. I wasn't making all those metal stanchions just to hide them under wood and tarps, so I made wood blocks sheathed in sheet bass, scribed to look like vertical wainscotting. It was the end of April by now, and the Baltimore Port Expo was in two weeks. I wanted to have hammocks in the bulwarks, as she appears in the portrait, but there was no time to figure this out, so I layered on some balsa and shaped it so it looked like tarps were laid over the hammocks. When I figure out how I'll represent the stowed hammocks, I can pull the balsa off easily enough. The bulwarks on, I made some fittings for the spencer masts; installed the eye bolts at the base of the masts; made some bollards (or whatever name they gave those posts), made and installed the catheads, which are laminated 1/16" basswood. I then started setting up a jury rig and her controls so she could sail at the Port Expo. I set her t'gallants and all three heads'ls this time around. By the night before the Expo, she was ready to go.

Admiralty drawings by RHBaker Admiral   Posted: 4 days ago
Norm, the SS Great Britain and the SS San Demetrio could be interesting, are they waterline or full hull drawings? Rowen

Damen Stan 4207 by RHBaker Admiral   Posted: 7 days ago
Decided to advance LI-PO plans and try a 4S 4000mAh pack. This weight of this pack reduced overall model weight by 8 oz, so it is now 9.6 lbs, close to the original target. Was also to slide the pack further sternwards until it touched the inner face of the RIB slipway, about 2.5” from the stern. The effect on the waterline was limited; the model now sits slightly higher with the waterline remaining level. Slowly increased the speed of the motors to assess the LI-PO performance. There was a significant improvement. There is no need to use “ full” power as it probably exceeds max scale speed. As the model accelerates the bow lifts exposing an area of the red bottom paint. The wake streams down the side of the vessel and curls off the spray rails. She looks very realistic. The attached picture is at part speed. The model is totally controllable, the influence of the centre fins is noticeable as the heeling is not pronounced unless extreme manoeuvring is tried. After 90 minutes of use decided all original objectives for the model are now accomplished. She looks and performs well. The next task is to tidy up the temporary wiring and fit the LI-PO properly. Will also have to re-route more accessories through the voltage reducer fitted for the bow thruster so the LED lights are not overpowered. Have also bought a small r/c controlled child’s jet ski toy with the intention is using the drive and control system in the RIB. It will require much mutilation of both the jet ski and the RIB to work them in together, but think it can be achieved. My next blog will tell.

Jet Sprint Boat by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 17 days ago
Hi Dave, thanks👍 More or less what I expected. During my career I occasionally worked on full size Fast Patrol Boats with water jets. The major problem the crew reported was 'keeping the damn thing in a straight line'! 🤔 Cheers Doug 😎

Fairplay X - Plastic Magic! :-) by saintsalvio Commander   Posted: 19 days ago
I used the stack two motors; the circuits and the esc so as the control radio of the tiny submarine i got for the purpose; the weight was right to float correct by the waterline; you can see it on a video on my little Youtube channel (look at Salvatore Mazzarella ) rescuing a sunseeker predator yacht with many glamour ladies in the bathub. P.S. unfortunately I am still living at work!

Shelduck by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
PS: I noticed that the waterline (transition yellow to red) follows the wave line! Small tip: to accurately set the true waterline and keep it straight set the hull up on the building board dead level and vertical according to the plan. Use spirit level to check port / starboard for horizontal! (I.e. athwartships in marine jargon!) Make a small right angled jig to hold a soft lead pencil (or simply use a small try square). Attach the pencil to the jig / try square at the waterline height from keel according to plan. Then just trundle round the hull marking the WL with the pencil point. Tip 2: use narrow (ca 10mm) Tamiya masking tape (from the plastic magic department) to mask off the line itself. The rest can be masked as usual with cheapo decorator's masking tape and newspaper. Spray away to your heart's content. The Tamiya tape gives a wonderful clean line with no paint creep. Please don't be offended, nobody's perfect and I'm still in awe of your woodwork! 👍 cheers Doug 😎

What battery do you choose? by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Strangely no one has answered an important part of your original question !? 🤔 How to calculate running time! Simply put; divide the capacity of the battery in amp-hours (AH) by the current in amps (A) drawn by the load. AH/A = H !! Step 1; measure the max current drawn A(max) by the motor under load; i.e. full speed ahead in water - hang on tight!. If not possible then use the max current data of the motor at the voltage you intend to use. Step 2; check the capacity of your battery; usually given in mAH for some peculiar reason! Divide by 1000 to get AH. Divide the capacity in AH by the max current in A =A(max). Result is the theoretical time that the fully charged battery can deliver the current required; i.e. runtime at full speed. Theoretical because in practise the usable capacity will be a bit less than nominal depending on the age and condition of the battery, ambient temperature etc. Also you won't want to completely discharge the battery; it won't like it 😡 Step 3; measure current at a mid-range throttle setting 'cruising' - A(cruise). Again divide capacity AH by A(cruise). result is 'cruising time in hours. If measuring not possible use the motor current data given at maximum efficiency. Should give a reasonable approximation. Example: motor current at full speed = 10A. Battery capacity 7000mAH = 7AH. Max theoretical runtime at full speed = 7/10Hr. Approx 42 minutes. Cruising current; 5A. Cruising time = 7/5Hr = 1.4Hr. Approx. 84 minutes. Use the highest capacity batt. you can get in without upsetting stability etc.! If you need ballast use a bigger battery; then you have 'payload ballast' instead of JUST ballast. Minimise current drain by; ensuring drive train is perfectly inline, well lubricated, prop is as small as possible for the desired performance (trial and error!). Hope this lot helps, not space science but a few basic rules! 😉 Happy sailing and lots o' fun. Cheers Doug 😎

a very noisy fireboat by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
its early on with this project, I was going to wait until its completed, but not sure when that will be, so Ill give you a sneak peak. I've been using a sound system in one of my model planes, and over time have become friendly with the guy who makes them, helping him with various things. I got thinking about the 4 foot fireboat I have, and how cool it would be to have a sound unit. So, to cut a long story short, I knew he had a plane sound with twin Merlin's for a bomber, and I use a merlin for my P51 Mustang model. After a serious amount of pestering, I got him to modify one of the 5 stock sounds on his Boat sound unit, using the twin Merlin sound from the planes. It took some work, getting rid of the propeller sound on the start up and shut down sequence. I ran it for the first time last night, but forgot to take spare batteries, and a small screwdriver to adjust the settings, so couldnt change the settings, in particular, the volume was set way too loud, losing some of the clarity of sound. This is pretty close to the real engines, which where v8 meteor, this sound is an actual recording of the v12 Merlin, its doubled up, and staggered, so you can hear the two engines running. It has start up and shut down sequence, it isn't clever enough to read reverse unfortunately. Its a speakerless system, using transducers instead of speakers, which are much louder, smaller and lighter. They rely on vibrations, they are epoxied to the hull, and the whole boat becomes the speaker! Its the first time I've done this, and its pretty new on the market for boats, planes have been going for a few years. I've realised that whilst I put them above the waterline, I didn't account for the roll of the hull, when one (there is one on either side) goes below the waterline it muffles the vibrations, and causes a funny sort of gurgling noise, ah well, like I say, its early days! Still a bit of tweaking to do, but you get the idea. Stock sounds are Turbo cat diesel, Johnson outboard, evenrude outboard, mercule v8, steam. They also have aux sounds, such as ships bell, steam whistle, horn, seagulls etc. I think on my system the Johnson is dropped in lieu of the twin merlin sound. Have a look at www.mrrcsound.com https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkJUHe1tR_w

Aeronaut Pilot Boat by Skipper44 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 25 days ago
Thank you very much for the speedy reply! Yes I have purchased some LED's off Ebay, ended up with 10 of each colour as thats the minimum you can buy! So plenty to spare if anyone wants a couple. I have also got an electro magnet which I intend on gluing (or sticking somehow so it doesnt warp the side) to the inside of the boat just above waterline. I will operate it on a seperate channel where i can turn it on and off using a turngy switch. This way i can come along side the model jettys that I have which have metal in them and attach on. I have been greatly admiring your photos cormorant! If you have a chance anymore videos of her running would be amazing! When i start mine in a couple of weeks I am going to do a time lapse and a stage by stage review until she is finnished and post it on youtube I think, only because there is very little of this boat on youtube. Anyway, many thanks for the help! Tintin

Speranza 03 by muddy Captain   Posted: 29 days ago
Started on the Stringers and Chines, some of the stringers are Spruce, 1/4" x 1/4" , one cracked on the bow curvature, not immediately it was glued and pinned, but about an hour after, should have laminated these spruce stringers as in 1/8" x 1/4" times 2. Another one has cracked since but they are repairable.. Mixed up a weak solution of PVA and water and painted the rest, hoping this will soften them up and be more pliable. Started on the transom, this is angled with a sharp centre line, but there was a lot of off cuts of Obechie lying around, so it was planked with a curve, first Modelers License applied. A few more dry fits and the bow and transom were assembled up, using stringers as alignment tools, anything will do in these instances even strips of ply. Some of the upper-works combing has been fitted around the transom area. Muddy....

Stanborough Lake. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 29 days ago
Hi Kipper. Thanks for the link, I had already looked at the site and unfortunately could not visit on the 27th May for their regular lakeside meeting to make contact with club members. However I had previously paid a visit to the lake on Sunday 21st May expecting to see a few boats on the lake on a what was a gloriously sunny afternoon and found not a single boat but plenty of wildfowl and the lake clogged with weed and leaves. It's a nice big stretch of water with plenty of landing stages around the shoreline and on the wooden bridge that separates the pleasure boating lake from the model boating lake but the amount of weed and detritus would make me wary of making a maiden voyage there. By contrast, I visited the lake at Verulam Park St Albans a week earlier and, although not as big, had little or no weed, but a few alarmingly large branches were being thrown into the water by dog walkers who were encouraging their pets to retrieve them, but were ultimately abandoned. Sadly no boats were being sailed there at the time so I could not make any inquiries with their owners. The first 3 pictures are Stanborough and the last 3 are St Albans. I think I know which I prefer but I would still like to have the view of others who use these lakes regularly. All responses welcome....please ! Thanks. Rob.

Speranza 01 by muddy Captain   Posted: 1 month ago
This is one that i,ve yearned after for some considerable years. Had the plans in the 1960's, I think, but it was always put on the back burner. But needs must, we have a big sailing lake now and a Sea Queen looks ideal on this water. Speranza, built from Plans, first thing source the timber, 5mm ply for keel and bulkheads,and Obechie 6mm X 3mm laminated for stringers and chine lines. Transferring bulkheads/frames to the timber can be daunting, but several methods can be applied. Personally i prefer to Trace the outline and detail then pin prick the outlines onto the timber, you can do this direct from the plan, but using tracing paper or drafting film saves the drawing from disintegrating. Have used carbon paper in the past, but I did find this a bit messy, a personal choice.

DAMEN STAN 4207 by RHBaker Admiral   Posted: 1 month ago
First open water test went well, but with two caveats: 1) Would like to increase performance somewhat, closer to her looks. The initial tests of the unfinished hull showed adequate performance. As the detail and superstructure have been added, it has deteriorated. The increased weight of over 2 lbs has increased draft and wetted area, thus drag. 2) The bow is slightly low. Decided the best way to improve performance would be to increase the NiMh battery output from 7.2 to 9.6 volts. Thus added two more cells to the forward “C” cell holder. Also increased the LED resistor capacity and added a voltage reducer to avoid burning out the lights and bow thruster at this new voltage. By examining the drawings and the model layout decided to tackle the second by moving the forward battery carrier from just in front of, to just behind, the centre of gravity. Fortunately the Damen drawings show the C of G location. This increased the stern draught by about 1/4”, with the bow similarly decreased. Also reduced the stern ballast to about 3 oz. A further open water test showed an nice improvement in speed with the model now sitting on the waterline. Running time exceeds an hour, she also looks trim and purposeful. Think this is about as fast as an 9.6 NiMh installation will operate. Adding more cells will increase weight, adding to the draught. Am toying with trying a LI-PO installation in the future. This will provide increased voltage with a weight reduction, but rather costly though. Have decided to enjoy the model as she currently is; there is plenty to look at with the working fire hydrant, the bow thruster, the work and navigation lights. Will concentrate on launching and making the RIB operate, have some ideas on how to do this and will report in due course.

3 Footer on a very rare outing by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
In response to Paul's question, the weight of my 46" crash tender is 6Kg without the main batteries and 7.2kg with. It got wet for the first time today with brief dunk in the 'test tank', and it sits about 10mm above the waterline all round 👍👍. I ran the motor up very cautiously while my son in-law held it tight, and the thrust even at about a quarter throttle is astonishing 😱. I didn't dare run it up to full throttle or it would easily empty the bath 😁. I just need somewhere to find somewhere to run it now, and the courage to 'give it some stick' to get it up on a plane (hopefully) 😉.