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>> Home > Tags > waterline

waterline
ahc waterson b444
blackwater
salt water
water cooled
water jacket
water line
water proofing
water pump
waterproof
waterline
Melik by NickW Petty Officer   Posted: 4 days ago
You might try here for some help: http://www.melik.org.uk/articl es/nile-gunboats/gunboat-melik / Otherwise it looks as if it's available in paper form only (waterline) Here's another link to maybe help what you're looking for: www.the-blueprints.com/bluepri nts/ships/ships-other/8112/vie w/tss_melik__gunboat___1898_/

Fantastic Plastic by sonar Commander   Posted: 6 days ago
So I have been doing some paint priming and still messing about with the outboard.. It now has the rudder dry fitted and it will not be seen above the waterline.. Most of the shaping is done now And I have cut out for access hatches to both to fit and get to the servo. The hatches I have got are semi waterproof and come off of some wet wipes. Now all the shapes are about right I will just carry on with a little more. And start looking about for the foam for the sponsons and some paints. This I am sure is going to be very light so with the electrics as low in the hull as possible and the foam tubes I have no Idea how much little ballast I will get away with...

HMS Illustrious Aircraft carrier by Gdaynorm Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 10 days ago
I am building a waterline model of HMS Illustrious, from WW2. I have virtually no information about the port side of the island. Does anyone have photos taken across the flight deck?

DAMEN STAN 4207 by RHBaker Admiral   Posted: 25 days ago
R.I.B completed, adding about another 1 oz to the vessel weight, also added the 4.5 oz as permanent ballast. Total model weight is now 156 oz. On review of many HMCC “Vigilant” pictures, note the top of the boot-topping can be almost coincident with the waterline. Decided the slight extra weight , beyond the 4.5 oz originally tried, will help raise the bow and have little effect on the stern draft, so left it as is. Sailed again in the portable pool and now consider the trim acceptable. The boot topping is visible for the full length of the hull; she sits very much like the full size vessel. Once the ice to leaves our local pond will see how well she performs in open water and what the run time will be. Have tried several approaches to making a R.I.B launch / recovery mechanism, but with little success. Seem to be able to either launch or recover using a single radio channel, but not both. Now decided to shelve this feature until inspiration strikes!

Lacquering the hull. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Now that the self-adhesive vinyl lettering and hull markings are now applied and correctly positioned…😉 I can now spray the lacquer finish on the hull. The gloss black areas will have a number of coats of Halfords clear gloss lacquer and the red ‘anti-fouling’ areas finished in Halfords clear satin lacquer. I started with the gloss lacquer first, so the all the deck area and the red ‘anti-fouling’ areas were masked. As I wanted the white waterline to be sealed with the gloss finish I masked below the line. After a thorough wipe over with some panel wipe the first coat of gloss was sprayed followed by a further two coats at 30 minute intervals. Fortunately it all went on without any runs or blemishes so I left it for a week to thoroughly harden after removing the masking. The black area was then masked from the bottom of the waterline, the area cleaned with panel wipe and sprayed with three coats of Halfords clear satin lacquer. With all the masking removed the boat was them put aside and left for a week for everything to dry thoroughly and then I polished the black area with some ‘T-cut’ polish to remove any surface blemishes and bring it to a full shine. All the hull marking and lettering are now firmly fixed and sealed and I’m very pleased with the final results. The next job will be to spray the deck and superstructure with the BS631 RAF Light Grey and then the majority of the paint process will be complete 😁

Suspected Seam by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Ok, I have found a suspected leaky seam, But i'm not sure if this is where the water is coming in from yet! I do know this seam is below the waterline! going to have to seal it some how! What procedure should I use any advice is welcomed...

Sad News by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Ed, its difficult when it happens but hopefully no lasting damage. Have a look at the prop shafts or the rudder posts, they are the most likely candidates. I would not wait to dry the hull, keep the electrics out but balast down to the waterline, use a torch???? the light will shine on the water coming in!!!! look around at the shafts rudders etc, you will be able to see any seepage. Hope this helps to find the cause Mark

Ballast for Puffer by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I have a large 4' Puffer purchased many years ago form Martins Models at an E Port show. Originally I tried lead but it became very heavy to carry. I modified mine by making three large sealed fibreglass containers in side the hull which were open at the base and had open portholes at the top exiting thro the hull sides. I now only need about 1lb of lead plus the 12v 12Ahr battery to ballast. Put the model in the water then add the battery and ballast, the boat sinks to the waterline. Take the battery and ballast out and the boat rises, lift with two straps and all the water drains leaving a light hull to carry. The pic shows the model in its lead ballast days.

Design bits by bellman1942 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
How do I calculate the CLR of my new Thames barge,I know it has to be within 10% of the waterline length behind the CofE of the sail plan I need this data to place the fin and ballast.

DAMEN STAN 4207 by RHBaker Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Repositioned 2/3 of the battery weight 8” sternwards into the only convenient location available. Rewired so the battery segments remain in series and the 7.2 volts operating voltage retained. Was able to retest and determined that adding 4.5 oz of ballast at the stern established a similar waterline to one of the pictures the model is based upon. Considered moving the remaining battery cells sternwards to avoid ballast, but this would be difficult due to the internal configuration of the model. The effect of saving the 4.5 oz ballast on a 9 lb model would have little discernible effect of the waterline, am thus reconciled to adding a small lead weight of up to this amount under the stern slipway. The next step is to complete the stern R.I.B and devise a launch / recovery mechanism. Whatever the weight of these item turns out to be will need to be subtracted from the 4.5 oz and become the final ballast weight.

Damen Stan 4207 by RHBaker Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Although we have had several signs of spring, the local outdoor pool is still closed. Our club was requested to attend a local boat show, using our portable pool, so took the opportunity to test the vessel as she is now almost complete. In an earlier post described that if the later additions could be contained within 2 lbs the model should be close to the correct waterline. This was determined by using weights balanced at the stern. So far, have added about 1 ½ lbs, but mainly around the mid section. From the attached pictures it can be seen that the bow is slightly low and the stern high. This suggests that by moving weight within the hull the correct balance can be obtained. If 16 oz is placed at the stern both bow and stern become correct. Am loath to just add ballast, prefer to rebalance and retain the current weight. Fortunately within the hull there is space towards the stern that can accommodate a heavy component. Had been reluctant to commit to either a stick or stack style NIMH battery, so decided to make one up using two plastic C type battery holders and individual C cells. See picture. The electrical system is 7. 2 volts, the cells were divided into 4 and a two cell trays. The heavier of these was disconnected and moved 8” sternwards. It is too early to finalize the weight distribution as have to build the R.I.B. and it's launch/retrieval system. Think that moving this 12 oz sternwards though the vessel should be close to the correct waterline.Hop e to be able to check that shortly. From the stern picture a list to starboard is evident. This is easy to correct by moving the batteries slightly in the opposite direction. Although the pool is quite small, was able to test all the other functions. Scale speed was realistic and during a sharp turn little heeling is apparent. Everything else, bow thruster, fire hydrant, lights, radar scanner, fin and rudders work satisfactorily.

Invictus build by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Most of my model are too big for a domestic test tank so I build a simple trough in one corner of a sunken patio with plastic sheeting over a wooden frame. Only needs a small volume of water to float the vessel and ballast to waterline. Far less grief involved! Dave

The Hull Markings by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
The paint on the hull has sufficiently hardened and needs a couple of coats of clear lacquer to protect it but before that happens I need to apply the hull markings. The waterslide decal set that was supplied with my kit was probably at least 5 years old when I bought the kit on eBay and they had deteriorated so badly that when I put the large ‘FIRE’ lettering panel in some warm water it fragmented and clearly was not usable. I called Mike Cummings at vintage Model works and explained my dilemma and he very generously agreed to supply me with a replacement set, and in addition a set of the recently available printed vinyl letters and markings that they now produce. I decided to use the vinyl set as a quick test piece with the waterslide set revealed that the white ink is not solid and therefore not completely opaque. Furthermore I could not eliminate the ‘silvering’ effect that happens on waterslide decals despite using various lotions and potions such as Humbrol Decalfix and Microsol/Microset solutions. A test piece with the vinyl lettering sheet was far more successful and when over-lacquered on the test piece the results were very acceptable. Starting with the large FIRE lettering I cut a paper template the same size as the complete word and fixed this with low tack masking tape on the hull, this paper was then outlined in more masking tape to form a window and the vertical spacing of the letters transferred to this to keep the correct spacing. Vertical strips of tape were then used as positioning guides for the letters which were individually cut and placed so that I could eliminate all but the solid white letters and give them a hard edge. Feeling very pleased with myself I removed the masking tape guides and realised to my horror that I had set the baseline of the letters far too close to the waterline and the vertical proportions were completely wrong ….disaster 😱 Feeling ashamed that I could make such a basic error I abandoned the lettering and called Mike at VMW and described my foolish error, no problem he said, I’ll send you another vinyl sheet and also some additional drawing that were missing from my kit that would help with detail finishing. My second attempt with the new vinyl sheet employed the same process but I was careful to measure, mark and check the positions (several times!) before starting. The roundel and numerals positions at the bow and the stern were carefully measured and marked using the supplied drawings and masking tape ‘guides’ used to fix their positions before application. Lastly the roman numerals that span the waterline at the bow and stern were marked, cut and individually applied. I also took the opportunity to fix in place a couple of modified 6mm portholes to replicate the aft cockpit drain outlets, in the photo is the ‘94’ waterslide decal which I later removed and replaced with vinyl when I could not eliminate the ‘silvering’ problem. A big Thank You to Mike Cummings at Vintage Model works for replacing the lettering sheets TWICE! and for the extra drawings, I call that exceptional after sales service !. Cheers Mike 👍👍 .

Applying the waterline. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Boatshed. Try as I might I could not achieve what you have done with the trimline tape, I'll put it down to my inexperience, this is only my second boat build in over 60 years! Hi Javro. You're quite right, I'm being too critical of myself and striving for perfection and failing is just beating myself up for nothing ! Looks even better from two feet away ! Hi Dave M. I still have my trusty Avo 8 meter with it's parallax scale, not much help in this case though 😁

Applying the waterline. by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Mark Unless you are looking exactly at the side of the model with your eyes aligned to the level of the line it will look wrong because the spray rail is raised from the hull. If you remember the old type of analogue volt meter, the better ones used to have a mirror on the scale to ensure you were viewing from the correct angle. I suspect now that we have aired the matter many will notice this on model boats. I suppose we are all wishing to achieve the correct finish to our models and yes we are sometimes too exacting. Dave