Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
August 2017: 7 people
July 2017: 16 people
June 2017: 8 people
May 2017: 8 people
April 2017: 23 people
March 2017: 9 people
February 2017: 12 people
January 2017: 17 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (27)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > waterline

waterline
ahc waterson b444
blackwater
salt water
water cooled
water jacket
water line
water proofing
water pump
waterproof
waterline
propshafts by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
Hi Dave, Yep, agree, to a certain extent. I have also had surprising results with 385 / 400 sizes; for instance with my 110cm heavy and cramped submarine. On the surface it outruns most boy racers 😁 Not exactly scale but all good fun. A little down angle on the forward planes and it throws up a beautiful handlebar moustache of water 😊 Not too much angle at speed or it sticks it's tail in the air 😲 No, the main question was that Fred already has the 700s so I simply suggested a decent match, 5mm shaft and so on. If he wants to spend on more motors fine. the the 3mm shaft would surely save weight, mostly through the smaller tube. Don't know the rest of the detail of the boat; beam, draft, safe waterline etc, but I would have thought a 3 footer would have a reasonable carrying capacity, like my 3 and 4 foot warships. Most of those run on multiple Speed 600s. And there I have the usual warship high length to beam ratio and associated stability problems! Like I said; he pays his money and takes his choice. Personally I would give it a whirl with the 700s since they are in the box! Maybe though with a 3 or 4mm shaft and appropriate coupling so he can adapt later if he wants to. Would still think a pair of 35 props would do the trick. Whatever, have fun Fred. Look forward to the Sea trials Report! (Wrote, read and commented enough of 'em in my old job!) Cheers Doug 😎 Oh no! Yet another thunderstorm just started, my terrace is already swamped 🤔

Decks by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
Some info. on radar, armament and wartime mods! 'Ya pays ya money and yer takes yer choice'! 😎 "Armament, electronics and protection The main armament of the Illustrious class consisted of sixteen quick-firing (QF) 4.5-inch (110 mm) dual-purpose guns in eight twin-gun turrets, four in sponsons on each side of the hull. The roofs of the gun turrets protruded above the level of the flight deck to allow them to fire across the deck at high elevations.[11] The gun had a maximum range of 20,760 yards (18,980 m).[12] Her light anti-aircraft defences included six octuple mounts for QF 2-pounder ("pom-pom") anti-aircraft (AA) guns, two each fore and aft of the island and two in sponsons on the port side of the hull.[11] The 2-pounder gun had a maximum range of 6,800 yards (6,200 m).[13] The completion of Illustrious was delayed two months to fit her with a Type 79Z early-warning radar; she was the first aircraft carrier in the world to be fitted with radar before completion.[11] This version of the radar had separate transmitting and receiving antennas which required a new mainmast to be added to the aft end of the island to mount the transmitter.[14] The Illustrious-class ships had a flight deck protected by 3 inches (76 mm) of armour and the internal sides and ends of the hangars were 4.5 inches (114 mm) thick. The hangar deck itself was 2.5 inches (64 mm) thick and extended the full width of the ship to meet the top of the 4.5-inch waterline armour belt. The belt was closed by 2.5-inch transverse bulkheads fore and aft. The underwater defence system was a layered system of liquid- and air-filled compartments backed by a 1.5-inch (38 mm) splinter bulkhead.[15] Wartime modifications While under repair in 1941, Illustrious's rear "round-down" was flattened to increase the usable length of the flight deck to 670 feet (204.2 m).[16] This increased her aircraft complement to 41 aircraft by use of a permanent deck park.[17] Her light AA armament was also augmented by the addition of 10 Oerlikon 20 mm autocannon in single mounts with a maximum range of 4,800 yards (4,400 m).[18] In addition the two steel fire curtains in the hangar were replaced by asbestos ones.[19] After her return to the UK later that year, her Type 79Z radar was replaced by a Type 281 system and a Type 285 gunnery radar was mounted on one of the main fire-control directors.[16] The additional crewmen, maintenance personnel and facilities needed to support these aircraft, weapons and sensors increased her complement to 1,326.[7] During her 1943 refits, the flight deck was modified to extend its usable length to 740 feet (225.6 m), and "outriggers" were probably added at this time. These were 'U'-shaped beams that extended from the side of the flight deck into which aircraft tailwheels were placed. The aircraft were pushed back until the main wheels were near the edge of the flight deck to allow more aircraft to be stored on the deck. Twin Oerlikon mounts replaced most of the single mounts. Other twin mounts were added so that by May she had a total of eighteen twin and two single mounts. The Type 281 radar was replaced by an upgraded Type 281M, and a single-antenna Type 79M was added. Type 282 gunnery radars were added for each of the "pom-pom" directors, and the rest of the main directors were fitted with Type 285 radars. A Type 272 target-indicator radar was mounted above her bridge.[16] These changes increased her aircraft capacity to 57[20] and caused her crew to grow to 1,831.[7] A year later, in preparation for her service against the Japanese in the Pacific, one starboard octuple "pom-pom" mount, directly abaft the island, was replaced by two 40 mm Bofors AA guns;[21] which had a maximum range of 10,750 yards (9,830 m).[22] Two more twin Oerlikon mounts were added, and her boilers were retubed.[21] At this time her complement was 1,997 officers and enlisted men.[7] By 1945, accumulated wear-and-tear as well as undiagnosed shock damage to Illustrious's machinery caused severe vibrations in her centre propeller shaft at high speeds. In an effort to cure the problem, the propeller was removed, and the shaft was locked in place in February; these radical measures succeeded in reducing, but not eliminating, the vibrations and reduced the ship's speed to about 24 knots (44 km/h; 28 mph).["

Tank Steering by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 days ago
Hi Doug Twitchy servos suggest a bad connection, either bad crimp or dirty contacts. This can also apply to the small feedback servo wiper inside the case. Can be fiddlesome to clean but if you can't source a replacement you may have no option. If I have a duf servo I usually strip and keep all the bits for spares. Your non worker could be from one of the early offerings that required negative as against positive pulses. If its that old it is likely to be very slow. The motor and gears should be ideal for a radar scanner. Sounds like a Bonner offering, possibly used a split power supply. There is no mention of short range in the specs and as its possibly aimed at aero and drone markets I doubt if it has restricted range. Like you my scale boats are very precious and I like to keep them close to shore so range is never really a problem, just make sure the aerial(s) are above the waterline, especially if sailing a yacht!. Dave

ESC POWER by RHBaker Admiral   Posted: 12 days ago
Hi Dave, The vessel in question was my Damen 4207, which has featured in an earlier blog. The installation of the LI-PO battery transformed the model, which now floats above the waterline and performs well. I am still trying to get a video and, once the new ESCs are fitted, will try again.In the meantime here is a picture of her underway.

Marking the waterline. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Great idea 👍👍👍 I have one in the cupboard that's almost never been used, now it will be, first customer: Sea Scout 'Jessica'. Doug 😎 PS: A word to the wise regarding masking tape! A few years ago I discovered Tamiya tape (from the plastic magic scene!) It comes in various widths is very flexible and so copes with complex curves with ease and gives a superb clean line, without the slight 'stepping effect' that using lots of short pieces to approximate curves does 🤔

The electrics, drive & radio by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
The switch panel and wiring loom was made, tested and dry fitted a while ago and so it only needs securing to the bulkhead with four fixing screws, the two NiMh batteries were strapped down to the bearers with cable ties as close to the chines as possible and the XT60 connectors mated. I have read that placing the heavy batteries as far away from the keel as possible improves the handling, all other heavy items are centered along the keel for symmetry and should help the boat to sit evenly in the water. I’m not sure if I will need to do any ballasting, hopefully the maiden voyages should give me an indication. The prop shaft was greased and fitted, and with the prop, thrust washers and lock nuts in place, the clearance was adjusted and locked with some Loctite so the motor could then be installed. The initial motor alignment was made with a solid coupler which was then replaced with the universal joint, I took the precaution to grind a flat on the motor shaft so that the locking grub screw has better grip on the shaft. The grease tube was then fitted to the shaft clamp and secured to the side of the switch panel. The ESC was fixed to the back of the bulkhead with another couple of cable ties and the input cables, again XT60 types, and the three pole XT60 motor connectors mated. I have also fitted a Turnigy in-line volt, amp and watt meter in the circuit before the ESC so that I can log readings in case of spurious fuse blowing issues or unexpected battery life problems. The water cooling tubes were then run from the water pickup, through the ESC and then back to the transom ‘exhaust’ outlet, all water connections are fitted with spring clips to ensure water tight connections. I have used quite a large bore silicone tubing to ensure maximum water flow and made sure that all bends are kink and compression free. The R/C receiver is fixed to the rear cabin wall with some Velcro pads for easy removal, the two aerials were fitted in some plastic tubing at 90 degrees to each other as recommended for 2.4 gig systems and as high above the waterline as possible. The receiver is connected to a separate 4.8 volt NiMh battery via a changeover switch that also has a charging connection and LED power indicator, and I have also fitted a battery voltage indicator, just because they are cheap and convenient although the R/C system that I have has telemetry that reports RX voltage as standard. The battery charger I have chosen can handle the 16 cell series configuration of the drive batteries and so they can be charged in-situ when the main power switch is toggled over to the charge position. The RX and lighting batteries are charged separately. All of the servo and lighting switch cables are routed through the hull to the receiver through pre drilled holes in the bulkheads at high level for neatness and to retain the integrity of each compartment just in case 😲!!. The servo and cables and the water cooling tubes are strapped to a supporting bar between the bulkheads for neatness and security. With the TX switched on first, the RX is then powered up and the main power switch toggled to the ‘operate’ position, the ESC then gives a reassuring series of bleeps that confirm that all is well. The ESC was set up using a Turnigy programming card specifically for that model of controller and if required I can tweak the settings once the boat has had a few sailings. The last things to do now are to fit some strong magnets to hold the hatches and roofs down securely and then finally raise the RAF ensigns 😁

a very noisy fireboat by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Paul As I already have the Action sound unit (Whitby lifeboat engine sound, my model) and a 20w amp I sourced some resonators from Holland www.soundimports.eu/. They were out of stock for the initial order so I bought two lower power exciters to see what they were like. Attached to the back deck of my Trent and plenty of volume but the vibration was very visible. I have now received some 24Watt (Dayton Audio DAEX25FHE-4 Framed High Efficiency 25mm Exciter 24W 4 Ohm) similar to yours and they are attached to the hull sides above the waterline and sound great on the bench. Will be trying on our lake as soon as the weather improves but should be as good as the big 8" speaker I was using and several pounds lighter so the model will sit correctly on the waterline. Thanks for sharing this sound medium Mine are attached by 3M VHB (Very High Bond) adhesive so I am hoping if I need to move or replace I can buy some glue to re-attach Dave

waterline model plans by kenbestford Seaman   Posted: 2 months ago
firstly many thanks to those members who helped me with my recent request for small scale vents ive recently received over 50 plans from various mags dating 1933 to mid 60s these are merchant ships of the period and are a3 size and laminated and look ideal for waterline modelling as they came from deceased amateur modelmaker there are too many to list but anyone interested in purchasing any of these at £4 plus postage then please contact me at ++ email removed pm only for your protection++

Admiralty drawings by RHBaker Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Norm, the SS Great Britain and the SS San Demetrio could be interesting, are they waterline or full hull drawings? Rowen

Damen Stan 4207 by RHBaker Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Decided to advance LI-PO plans and try a 4S 4000mAh pack. This weight of this pack reduced overall model weight by 8 oz, so it is now 9.6 lbs, close to the original target. Was also to slide the pack further sternwards until it touched the inner face of the RIB slipway, about 2.5” from the stern. The effect on the waterline was limited; the model now sits slightly higher with the waterline remaining level. Slowly increased the speed of the motors to assess the LI-PO performance. There was a significant improvement. There is no need to use “ full” power as it probably exceeds max scale speed. As the model accelerates the bow lifts exposing an area of the red bottom paint. The wake streams down the side of the vessel and curls off the spray rails. She looks very realistic. The attached picture is at part speed. The model is totally controllable, the influence of the centre fins is noticeable as the heeling is not pronounced unless extreme manoeuvring is tried. After 90 minutes of use decided all original objectives for the model are now accomplished. She looks and performs well. The next task is to tidy up the temporary wiring and fit the LI-PO properly. Will also have to re-route more accessories through the voltage reducer fitted for the bow thruster so the LED lights are not overpowered. Have also bought a small r/c controlled child’s jet ski toy with the intention is using the drive and control system in the RIB. It will require much mutilation of both the jet ski and the RIB to work them in together, but think it can be achieved. My next blog will tell.

small cowl vents required by kenbestford Seaman   Posted: 2 months ago
im making waterline models of merchant vessels of the 50s and 60s and having trouble to get cowl vents scale 1.250 length approx 8 to 12 mm.Does anyone know of a supplier for such and any other fittings of this scale

Fairplay X - Plastic Magic! :-) by saintsalvio Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
I used the stack two motors; the circuits and the esc so as the control radio of the tiny submarine i got for the purpose; the weight was right to float correct by the waterline; you can see it on a video on my little Youtube channel (look at Salvatore Mazzarella ) rescuing a sunseeker predator yacht with many glamour ladies in the bathub. P.S. unfortunately I am still living at work!

Shelduck by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
PS: I noticed that the waterline (transition yellow to red) follows the wave line! Small tip: to accurately set the true waterline and keep it straight set the hull up on the building board dead level and vertical according to the plan. Use spirit level to check port / starboard for horizontal! (I.e. athwartships in marine jargon!) Make a small right angled jig to hold a soft lead pencil (or simply use a small try square). Attach the pencil to the jig / try square at the waterline height from keel according to plan. Then just trundle round the hull marking the WL with the pencil point. Tip 2: use narrow (ca 10mm) Tamiya masking tape (from the plastic magic department) to mask off the line itself. The rest can be masked as usual with cheapo decorator's masking tape and newspaper. Spray away to your heart's content. The Tamiya tape gives a wonderful clean line with no paint creep. Please don't be offended, nobody's perfect and I'm still in awe of your woodwork! 👍 cheers Doug 😎

a very noisy fireboat by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
its early on with this project, I was going to wait until its completed, but not sure when that will be, so Ill give you a sneak peak. I've been using a sound system in one of my model planes, and over time have become friendly with the guy who makes them, helping him with various things. I got thinking about the 4 foot fireboat I have, and how cool it would be to have a sound unit. So, to cut a long story short, I knew he had a plane sound with twin Merlin's for a bomber, and I use a merlin for my P51 Mustang model. After a serious amount of pestering, I got him to modify one of the 5 stock sounds on his Boat sound unit, using the twin Merlin sound from the planes. It took some work, getting rid of the propeller sound on the start up and shut down sequence. I ran it for the first time last night, but forgot to take spare batteries, and a small screwdriver to adjust the settings, so couldnt change the settings, in particular, the volume was set way too loud, losing some of the clarity of sound. This is pretty close to the real engines, which where v8 meteor, this sound is an actual recording of the v12 Merlin, its doubled up, and staggered, so you can hear the two engines running. It has start up and shut down sequence, it isn't clever enough to read reverse unfortunately. Its a speakerless system, using transducers instead of speakers, which are much louder, smaller and lighter. They rely on vibrations, they are epoxied to the hull, and the whole boat becomes the speaker! Its the first time I've done this, and its pretty new on the market for boats, planes have been going for a few years. I've realised that whilst I put them above the waterline, I didn't account for the roll of the hull, when one (there is one on either side) goes below the waterline it muffles the vibrations, and causes a funny sort of gurgling noise, ah well, like I say, its early days! Still a bit of tweaking to do, but you get the idea. Stock sounds are Turbo cat diesel, Johnson outboard, evenrude outboard, mercule v8, steam. They also have aux sounds, such as ships bell, steam whistle, horn, seagulls etc. I think on my system the Johnson is dropped in lieu of the twin merlin sound. Have a look at www.mrrcsound.com https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkJUHe1tR_w

Aeronaut Pilot Boat by Skipper44 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
Thank you very much for the speedy reply! Yes I have purchased some LED's off Ebay, ended up with 10 of each colour as thats the minimum you can buy! So plenty to spare if anyone wants a couple. I have also got an electro magnet which I intend on gluing (or sticking somehow so it doesnt warp the side) to the inside of the boat just above waterline. I will operate it on a seperate channel where i can turn it on and off using a turngy switch. This way i can come along side the model jettys that I have which have metal in them and attach on. I have been greatly admiring your photos cormorant! If you have a chance anymore videos of her running would be amazing! When i start mine in a couple of weeks I am going to do a time lapse and a stage by stage review until she is finnished and post it on youtube I think, only because there is very little of this boat on youtube. Anyway, many thanks for the help! Tintin