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>> Home > Tags > wet and dry

wet and dry
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wet and dry
Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by kmbcsecretary Captain   Posted: 28 days ago
Thanks Doug it took about 4 weeks in total to complete the planking. The varnish is Wilko's own brand clear gloss yacht varnish which was sanded with fine wet and dry sand paper between each coat to get that smooth finish on the final coat. I will show all the hand made fittings next which I have already started making Ron

Doors by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Colin, I think the wood for the doors is about 2mm thick, a thin strip slightly wider than 2mm of plasticard is super glued around the edge, then using wet and dry sanded flush front and back. After drilling the hole for the porthole, the whole lot was given a couple of coats of Halfords clear lacquer and the knob stuck on. 👍

Bulwark capping by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
So, here we go again. Bulwark capping, I didn't have a piece of teak wide enough to cut these out off, so two strips of teak were cut to the relevant size on the band saw and sanded. A large piece of plywood was laid on the top of the hull, the hull outline was drawn onto the plywood, blocks of wood were secured to the plywood to hold the strips of teak in place but exaggerating the curve. [To allow for spring back] The teak was soaked overnight, the next day it was soaked in boiling water a few times, whilst still hot and wet it was placed in the blocks to dry. I had to alter the blocks once to gain a bit more curve. After the strips were properly dried, the top and sides of the strips were given two coats of finishing resin and left to dry, then the underside was coated with super glue and left the dry. Then the tricky bit, wearing my best glasses I applied with the aid of a tooth pick super glue to the tops and bulwark supports and fitted the capping's. The piece around the stern was cut out of one piece and looks alright.

Spraying/hand painting by Peter581 Petty Officer   Posted: 3 months ago
Perhaps you have answered the question your self, wet and dry and after a couple of coats you should find it smooth and without blemish. This is the time to ensure there is no dust around. A good idea is to try and make a shelter around the boat and wet it before giving it the final cost of a good quality gloss paint. It really is just a matter of perseverance and you should have a great finish. Good luck! Peter581

Spraying/hand painting by RichardSReade Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
After modding my Sea Queen with the new prop shaft I decided to smarten it up as the previous spray job I did was not too good, well I have had terrible trouble with it, the first attempt saw the original paint raise as I sprayed it with a primer that was supposed to be safe with all paints, so I removed as much as i could using the heat gun and a scraper, after sanding down and filling, I started again, i had some small patches raise up where I could not get the original paint completely removed, but after letting it dry and some wet and dry I managed to get a good primer coat on it. I then decided to spray it all white, so as I have always had good results with halfords own brand I gave it some light coats of white gloss, I was unable to get a reasonable gloss finish and it also needed some more filling, funny how a gloss coat show up all the defects, well subsequent attempts at spraying were useless, run after run and a poor gloss finish. All I can think is that I could not have had the area blanketed off in the workshop warm enough and the thinners in the paint was not drying as it hit the boat and just ran. I am now half way into sanding it all back and have decided to hand paint, What is the best paint and method to getting a near spray paint finish by hand brushing?

treatment by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi John, Lets take your questions one at a time. Surface prep. Close joints are always good but not essential, glueing plastic involves a form of welding, ie the surfaces melt together forming a filler as well as a glue. Plastic weld is a model railway product which is very good, it's a liquid applied with a brush and the pieces are held until the liquid evaporates. Prep all surfaces as there might be release agents and / or fingerprints on the surface, washing up liquid is great for this, also when ready for painting wash again and lightly scuff the surface with fine wet and dry paper, (600 grade). Epoxy. Is not a good glue for plastic hulls and superstructures as they flex and move, epoxy is brittle and will fail over time. Finish painting with a plastic primer, (Halfords) this gives a flexible basecote, then paint as desired, i use car type acrylic paints, if you want a colour not as a car, you can get paint made up to your spec. In short, Liquid poly glue, clean before the build and when ready for paint. Hope this helps Mark

Progress on the hull - At Last! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
After many distractions and accumulating 'stuff' to go in and on the boat I finally got around to tidying up the hull this week. After flattening with 180 / 240 wet and dry I sealed with Ezekote flattened again then sprayed with a professional grade primer / filler from the auto branch. As usual this showed up all the pits so I filled them with Revell Plasto and primed again. After going round this loop a few times I was (reasonably) happy and flattened with 600 W&D. Then sprayed on Royal Blue from a giant rattle can, also from the auto pro market. Flattened off with 1200 W&D between coats. I have Tamiya Royal Blue acrylic for my air brush as well but couldn't be bothered to set up the compressor🤔 Can worked pretty well though. 👍 Last pic shows the 'Before'! Will leave the final finishing, nameplate and lacquer coat until I have finished the internal fitting out and the cabin. Have decided to plank the cockpit with mahogany😲 just ordered from Krick! First attempt at planking - Wish me luck! I like the blue hull so much I think I will just mark the waterline with a red (or white?) boot topping stripe. Comments welcome. Cabin will be white with a blue roof. Now to continue with the new prop shaft, old one is showing signs of wear at both ends and rust at the wet end 🤔 Anyway it's got an imperial thread which is useless when all my brass props are metric. More soon, I hope 😉 Cheers Doug 😎

Varnish by Colin H. Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
Yup that's real GOLD, and I have used for fifty years on real boats as well as models. I rub down with 2500 wet and dry after the final coat has hardened for at least two weeks. Then use a beeswax polish on a slow orbital polisher or by hand. It's really worth the effort. Best of luck Colin.

Varnish by Haverlock Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
As an afterthought when you have rubbed down with wet and dry used wet wash the paintwork off well allow to dry and then use a lint free cloth to make sure all the old paint dust is gone. Make sure you work over a surface you do not mind being marked since the drips from rubbing down make an excellent paint on an absorbent surface!! ( yes I made the mistake so I KNOW). Its a very messy process but well worth the effort.

Varnish by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
Exactly Haverlock👍 wet with washing up liquid between coats is what creates the polishing effect and final gloss. Something I learned the hard way back in my car restoration days. Dry sanding creates more of a 'silk/satin' or worse matt effect. 😎

Varnish by Haverlock Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
use 600 wet and dry wet for first few coats then 1200 wet then after last coat wait a few weeks and use something like "T" cut ( used to restore car paint). The wet and dry is better used wet ( with a dash of washing up liquid in the water) since it cuts down on the clogging of the paper.

What paint type by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Hi Scotty Welcome to the site. Just had a look on the web about Sanson Tugboat see pic. As you intend to allow the planking to show I suggest you use G4 Pond Sealer (Bondaglass Product) on your hull after you have sanded smooth to shape. You can also use on the inside. It's a polyurethane type so can be easily brush applied in thin coats and sets rock hard as well as being totally waterproof. You can overpaint if you carefully roughen the surface with wet and dry paper. Once the colour is dry and any decals applied you can apply a final coat of G4 over the whole hull and it will be protected against the odd knock etc. As Doug says acrylic is easy and pleasant to use for the upper works and can be sealed with acrylic clear lacquer, I find silk works best on a scale model. Sounds like an interesting project is it a kit? If you start a build blog we can watch your progress and you will be able to ask for help and advice as the build progresses. Please keep us posted on progress. Enjoy the build Dave

Steaming ply- good idea or not? by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 months ago
Hi Chris, A way is to score the back of the piece to be curved with a sharp blade, depending on the thickness of the ply. Also lay a few pieces of kitchen paper on a flat surface and go over the piece with a rolling pin pressing hard to get a curve into the ply. Wetting the ply, test some scrap ply and see if it delaminates, if not wet it and put it round a former such as a paint can hold it with bands or straps until dry. Hope this helps Mark

Paint removal by none Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 months ago
Wet and dry sandpaper and lots of washing up liquid go down through the grades of paper til 320 grit The worst thing you can do it try to send it all back Better to send and get a good base to start again with spray paint

Jet Sprint Boat by none Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 months ago
So If things are still not going well It may be better to take the moulding you have and work from that. Chuck all the moulding away . Flat board screw the hull down on the edges. Filler and sanding and keep going til your happy with it then finer and finer sandpaper then wet and dry and finished off with G3 polish then wax and pva then make the mould. Bearing in mind any blemishes in the mould will be in EVERY moulding taken.. Making the mould is not as hard as you think.