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>> Home > Tags > wet and dry

wet and dry
andrea gail
bandsaw
belt sander
bring and buy
commander
helgoland
ireland
portland model power boat association
sanding
sanding sealer
sea commander
wandering star
wet and dry
Varnish by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
Yup that's real GOLD, and I have used for fifty years on real boats as well as models. I rub down with 2500 wet and dry after the final coat has hardened for at least two weeks. Then use a beeswax polish on a slow orbital polisher or by hand. It's really worth the effort. Best of luck Colin.

Varnish by Haverlock Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
As an afterthought when you have rubbed down with wet and dry used wet wash the paintwork off well allow to dry and then use a lint free cloth to make sure all the old paint dust is gone. Make sure you work over a surface you do not mind being marked since the drips from rubbing down make an excellent paint on an absorbent surface!! ( yes I made the mistake so I KNOW). Its a very messy process but well worth the effort.

Varnish by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
Exactly Haverlock👍 wet with washing up liquid between coats is what creates the polishing effect and final gloss. Something I learned the hard way back in my car restoration days. Dry sanding creates more of a 'silk/satin' or worse matt effect. 😎

Varnish by Haverlock Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
use 600 wet and dry wet for first few coats then 1200 wet then after last coat wait a few weeks and use something like "T" cut ( used to restore car paint). The wet and dry is better used wet ( with a dash of washing up liquid in the water) since it cuts down on the clogging of the paper.

What paint type by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Hi Scotty Welcome to the site. Just had a look on the web about Sanson Tugboat see pic. As you intend to allow the planking to show I suggest you use G4 Pond Sealer (Bondaglass Product) on your hull after you have sanded smooth to shape. You can also use on the inside. It's a polyurethane type so can be easily brush applied in thin coats and sets rock hard as well as being totally waterproof. You can overpaint if you carefully roughen the surface with wet and dry paper. Once the colour is dry and any decals applied you can apply a final coat of G4 over the whole hull and it will be protected against the odd knock etc. As Doug says acrylic is easy and pleasant to use for the upper works and can be sealed with acrylic clear lacquer, I find silk works best on a scale model. Sounds like an interesting project is it a kit? If you start a build blog we can watch your progress and you will be able to ask for help and advice as the build progresses. Please keep us posted on progress. Enjoy the build Dave

Steaming ply- good idea or not? by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi Chris, A way is to score the back of the piece to be curved with a sharp blade, depending on the thickness of the ply. Also lay a few pieces of kitchen paper on a flat surface and go over the piece with a rolling pin pressing hard to get a curve into the ply. Wetting the ply, test some scrap ply and see if it delaminates, if not wet it and put it round a former such as a paint can hold it with bands or straps until dry. Hope this helps Mark

Paint removal by none Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Wet and dry sandpaper and lots of washing up liquid go down through the grades of paper til 320 grit The worst thing you can do it try to send it all back Better to send and get a good base to start again with spray paint

Jet Sprint Boat by none Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
So If things are still not going well It may be better to take the moulding you have and work from that. Chuck all the moulding away . Flat board screw the hull down on the edges. Filler and sanding and keep going til your happy with it then finer and finer sandpaper then wet and dry and finished off with G3 polish then wax and pva then make the mould. Bearing in mind any blemishes in the mould will be in EVERY moulding taken.. Making the mould is not as hard as you think.

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi John Having looked closely at your hull construction and joints it would appear that over time the joints have failed. I have a Mercantic with exactly the same problem. If you can sand the raised joints flat then there is a method we use on our mahogany planked schooners that provided a water tight seal and produces a very high shine finish of great strength and resilience. We use G4 pond sealer which is a polyeurethane paint available from Garden Centres. ABL Stevens are my local supplier http://www.resin-supplies.co.uk/sealants.htm Its a one-pack polyurethane varnish hardened by moisture in the atmosphere or from the material being sealed, used as a sealant for timber or a barrier coat for concrete, preventing resin being attacked by moisture or alkali's. It's brush painted, touch dry in a couple of hours, dried in 24 hrs and is fully hardened in one week. We usually apply one coat then after 24 hrs wet and dry any blemishes and apply a final thin coat. We also coat the inside of the hull. If your hull has thinned in places then you could use tissue or thin glass cloth inside the hull to give added strength as others have suggested. Hope you manage to get the result you require. Dave

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by HoweGY177 Lieutenant   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi John, Suggest you sand as this will flatten the planking, no doubt each plank has curved slightly as the wood had dried out. Hoover out all the dust from the cracks and fill with a mahogany filler and re-flatten. The inside of the hull will also need varnishing to stop the wood drying out again. Would not advise wetting the planking to raise the grain as is normal practice as this might swell the wood and loose the filler. First use a good quality polyurathene varnish, brushed on but avoid runs, lightly sand to give a key before recoating. At this stage do not worry about the brush strokes showing. After at least 8 coats use wet and dry paper to sand the surface flat. Now apply a yacht varnish that does not dry so quickly and brush strokes will on the whole disappear. I suggest at least 3 coats to finish lightly wet and dry between coats. The more coats you give the deeper the shine. Use a good quality brush, a cheap brush drops hairs and does not give a smooth finish. If you look at my harbour and look at 'River Dance' you will see the finish this method can achieve. Good luck and hopes this helps. Vic

Finishing by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
Hi Martin, Bin round the Talisker ? 😉 @stwdv; ignore what comes next, go to the last paragraph 😎 The scale effect (as I understand it) has nothing or little to do with shine! It refers to lightening / fading the colour to fool the brain into thinking an object is further away than it is, and therefore think it is larger. Look at any landscape photo or 'in real', hills or forests further away look lighter or more grey than the green ones in the foreground. There are pros and cons to both as Dave says. Cellulose is history, except from some nitrated cellulose solvents. In the car restoring days of my youth I remember getting crinkling if I used cellulose thinners from a different manufacturer than the paint 😡 @stwdv: if you do it veeeery carefully in very very thin misted layers (barely wet) you CAN put put a different paint on others BUT you need flat of and prime the old paint first. Pay a bit more for your primer (universal types) and ensure that the coating is absolutely complete and totally dry and hardened. Some combinations work better than others. But essentially it is better not to mix and match. It's essenentially the thinners that does the damage, less is more sometimes! Try to avoid cheap aerosols, paying a bit more avoids a lot of heartache and extra work, or throwing things in the bin 😡 They tend to have a fairly wide spread on the nozzles which wastes a lot of paint through over-spray. They also tend to be a bit thick and difficult to control the flow which can cause 'orange peeling or even runs and 'splodges' if the spray stutters. To counteract this one has to spray thinner; i.e. back off more from the object - which causes more over-spray. 🤔 The little spray cans made for modellers are much better than this in all respects than the cheap jumbo cans from the hardware store. Get a decent air brush for the big bits, then you can control the paint viscosity, flow and size and shape of the spray cone. takes a bit of practice but is worth it if you intend to build more models. But I suspect you wanted tips on the preparation! So let's cut to the chase😉 Sanding and filling are the buzz words. Checking the surface very lightly with your fingertips is much more sensitive and accurate than relying on your eyes. 🤓 When you think you got it right put on a THIN coat of primer (matched type to the finishing paint!) and you will soon see the spots you missed! So back to the filling and sanding. Use a very fine filler at this stage. Prime again and flat it off with 240 to 400 wet'ndry. Take off the residue with a damp sponge and dry!!! Go round this loop a few times and when eyes and finger tips agree you are ready for the finishing colour coats. Thin, let dry. Check for blemishes. Fix if necessary, flat off -> next coat. ALWAYS take note of paint can drying / hardening notes. Don't rush or you'll end up doing it again 😉 Hope this helps, bon chance mon ami 😎Doug PS my larger model (mostly warships!) I use resin based paints in half litre cans from the DIY shops and an airbrush. They are hard wearing, come in all colours (RAL codes) and finishes and are easy to mix and thin with turps or white spirit. They take the enamel for detailing with no problems. Snags: take longer to dry, but they are hard wearing and cheaper than millions of 14ml cans 👍

Finishing by Westquay Captain   Posted: 6 months ago
That's why I counselled caution with anything over acrylic...including, as it happens, acrylic. HRG enamels take a very short time to dry. In fact so much so that they sell a decelerator to slow drying time to maintain a wet edge. Very important when you're painting a narrow boat by hand, although a lot of people then use Owatrol mixed in with the enamel. I sprayed HRG enamel, thinned with white spirit and I sprayed all the parts of a kit car with it. It dried the same afternoon and was handleable the next day with ease. Needless to say it glossed beautifully, being enamel. Spray cans can be OK, but are very expensive for what they re and NEVER use over acrylic as they will wrinkle. What goes in those cans ain't pure water based acrylic, trust me. For one thing, it stinks a fair bit. I've painted enough slot car bodies to know that and what Halfords mix for you is pure, stinks-of-peardrops cellulose, whatever they might tell you. None of them know a fraction of we old painty farts know! If you can afford them, I would recommend Zero paints. They're formulated to be airbrush ready, need no thinning and are to quote the man that makes them, "cellulose only different". I did a 3 foot model narrow boat for somebody and they went on beautifully out of my Paasche Model H single mix airbrush (all you need). In fact I have also used them from my spotting gun (cheap as chips and easy to clean, IF you have a compressor). Zeros mask well too. Problem is he won't post and wants a fortune for courier. I won't play that game when I just had 2 deliveries of epoxy resin through the post. I have recently used Tamiya spray cans that were given to me (yes I really AM that tight) and they are excellent, but then, they really are cellulose. I wish I could buy cellulose, but it allegedly isn't made these days...Hmmmm. Something ending in "...ocks" comes to mind. I'd honestly stick to enamels bought from a car paint suppliers. Their wet'n'dry is cheaper too. Always talk to the organ grinder himself, never his monkey, hence auto refinishers' suppliers. Martin

Sea Rover planking by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
Not liking to see a thread unfinished, here are the photos as promised of the finished planking. Lime planks (Ikea blinds) glued with super glue, black card for caulking, Teak edging, several coats of Halfords spray lacquer, wet and dry in between coats. Final coat rubbed down with 1200 wet and dry then cutting compound, and polished with car polish. Alan

Fiberglassing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Hi chugalone 100 Welcome to the site. You can fibreglass with different types of resin and cloth. If you are making and casting a fibreglass hull use fibreglass matting but to cover a hull lightweight fibreglass cloth is best. This is the type shown in the suggested video. Resin can be epoxy or polyester based but the latter is generally cheaper and in my opinion is easier to use and doesn't require thinning with alcohol. It is sold as layup resin and is supplied with hardener. Do follow the instructions re quantity of each part and mix thoroughly. If you are using epoxy Iso Propyl Alcohol is the type to use and is clear. The video shows using a brush to apply the resin and whilst this is OK it will give a very thick and heavy coating. I use the brush to apply and then a credit card sized piece of plasticard to spread the resin over and into the surface of the cloth resulting in an almost opaque finish with the weave showing through. You do need to have a good surface to work with as any imperfections will show when the resin hardens. Once dry give a light sanding all over to remove any imperfections and fill any holes with car body filler and sand smooth. I then apply a very thin top coat of the resin using a brush. When dry use wet and dry to sand and if necessary apply further thin coats until you have the finish you require. I have a local supplier and if you visit the site http://www.resin-supplies.co.uk/product.htm all the resins/cloths etc are listed. Using Google should bring up a local supplier. you do need to follow the safety instructions to protect yourself and wear appropriate protection for your hands, eyes and breathing, it is also best to apply in a well ventilated area and not on a cold day. The end result will be well worth the effort to keep your tug waterproof. You could also paint the resin over thye inside of the hull to protect the wood from any water that doeos find its way inside. Dave

Soldering 1/12 Scale Brass Railings by Haverlock Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
First take a deep breath and calm down. Soldering is easy if your only using 2mm material I would get a reel of 60/40 cored solder. Use a decent sized electric soldering iron. Clean all your joints well ( use a fine abrasive like 600 wet and dry). Apply the iron to the joint then apply the solder remove solder remove iron. You made a joint repeat until you have done. Try not to burn yourself. Clean any flux with meths and an abrasive.