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>> Home > Tags > wheelhouse

wheelhouse
boat house
clubhouse
coach house
wheelhouse
nearing completion! by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 hours ago
So, I have managed to crack on quite a bit this week. Ive done a heap at work on nights this week, followed by near enough a whole weekend of no interuptions as the "long haired Segeant Major" has been at her parents for the weekend!😁 it took a couple of days to build the coxswains console out of balsa and alot of fettling with plastitube and sheet, very please with the outcome. its not 100% scale acurate as is the rest of the model, but close enough to give a good representation of the wheelhouse contents. Just the Coxswain and seat to build and paint for a completed wheelhouse. The rest of the weekend has seen the cockpit just about finished, painted and laquered. So, to complete the model the following items need to be built, painted and fitted. Radar mount and radar, instrument dials, cockpit glazing, antenna mast and rigging, towing bitt, rear cockpit railing and winch, hull grab ropes, anchor, and finally about 2 kilos of lead ballast to get her sitting right on the water. I reckon another week to 10 days for a completed model!

Devils in the detail by Donnieboy Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 days ago
The wheelhouse is really coming together.Nice job.Will look great when finished.

Devils in the detail by Skydive130 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 days ago
after another week of work and in-laws visiting, ive managed to get a couple of days of detailing work done on the wheelhouse structure. The local model shop parted with several bits of plasticard, plastic rods and strips of various sizes after I parted with a few quid! after alot of photo studying, I have made a fair start on adding all the detail inside the wheel house. Its not a 100% acurate, but at this scale and once painted it should show a fair representation of the Waveney class wheelhouse. There is still quite a bit of detailing to go, before I remove the major components for detail painting. Ive started to build the seat for the Coxswain. There is also alot of roof detailing to go, but all in good time!

Spektrum, new, useless... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 28 days ago
Yep, he done good, did the Naval man in Munchen. I'm in his debt and if I use the TX to fly I promise I'll insure myself, but I ain't joinin' a club unless the local one is as cheap as someone recently suggested. And the only decal on my wings will be the SMAE, if I have to hand paint it! Now...back to boats. Tis my birthday and my dear bride bought me a set of the old Yeoman white metal fittings for my Crash Tender, so now the kids have departed I will have a wee clean up of them. Then, a Chicken Achar from the new Indian restaurant. A bonus is that she also bought me a pack of 20 beautifully made turned brass portholes, glazed, that I've just realised will fit the Crash Tender wheelhouse. Result...I HATE glazing portholes. I did 9 on a scratchbuilt canal boat and it drove me nuts. 4 down, 16 to put back in storage, the last of Modelling Timbers' stock of them and the manufacturer no longer does em. Martin

Vinyl lettering by Manofkent Petty Officer   Posted: 1 month ago
With the demise of Barry's Model Lettering, where can one get lettering for RNLI lifeboats? Whilst BECC do the Bliss Yellow for the stern lettering and also the Bliss shadow to make up name plates their lettering packs are still in the old font of Arial and for the bow and Wheelhouse roof legend it needs to be in Bliss Bold. Any ideas. I have contacted Dawson signs and Stickylettering but neither can/will do in Bliss font.

54 year old Crash Tender by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
If you need any ideas for the working bits, let me know. I can't help with the lecktricks, but they didn't call me "Mekanist" at Wolfsburg for nuttn! Well little Lothar always did anyway. I've just tapped the tiller 2mm...because that's what I have!, so a flat was filed on the rudder shaft, so I don't have to tighten it too much. I ended work today on the CT by making window frames for the wheelhouse. Don't know why everyone makes them for the cabins too...they don't have 'em, just gutters, so I made them too from brass wire. Just watered the plants, so the cumfy chair beckons.

54 year old Crash Tender by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Ah, old car days, eh? Nothing phased us. Can't touch them now. No idea what it all is under that plastic cover. Spookilly, I've just done a pattern in 1/32nd scale for a Maranello GTO1964. One of my favourite cars messed over by Maranello for Le Mans. Your fish cutter seems to be throwing some problems up, but nuttn' a spot of resin can't fix. I don't buy that propellor blade rumour. We have no decent pics of the thing, but you can clearly enough see there aint no twist in the legs like a prop would have. I've just made mine in brass and simply flattened the tube in the vice to get a similar section and soldered to other tubes. All I have to do is make rings and attach the blocks for the ensign ropes. Also cut and attached the toe strips either side of the decks in Venetian blind slat, some leftovers from decking the Vanity cutter model. Now I need to cut some mahogany and attach to the side of the decks as the rubbing strake. Finaly will be making gutters for the smaller windows (NO frames there) and frames for the wheelhouse windows, then I can paint it. I have decided on white roofs after a peer at the good photos again, where the vents all seem to be white. But non-slip was clearly a pain to clean as the roofs and decks are bloody filthy! Vincent's having a break for a while. Call it my annual leave, which I never normally have. Cheers, Martin

54 year old Crash Tender by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Purple and black?? Jeez. Was that hand painted, Doug? Strombergs are indeed good carbs. I've had many, being a Triumph man for many years. Just make sure there ain't no pin prick holes in the diaphragms, or the one in the breather pot in between. I know a tuner man who swears that Strombergs are good for 150 BHP, before you need to consider the incredibly fussy Webers. Crash tender now fully filled and rubbed down . Now about to glue on those half round edges. My Dad had meticulously flushed the edges when he built it! Then the dummy window slider frames on the wheelhouse rear windows and some dummy frames for the wheelhouse doors. I think that'll keep me busy for the rest of the day and then I'd better get on with the Vincent Black shadow pattern I've been on for months! Cheers, Martin

54 year old Crash Tender by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
I would like first to say that this is NOT a restoration. It has always been mine and followed me around all those years, been used extensively on Oyster beds on the Essex coast and Valentine's Park in Ilford, Essex...even the great Victoria Park, of which my Granddad was a founder member. It has eaten its way through lantern batteries out of number which my Dad, who was in the business could magic from thin air. There was always a nook in the boot of the Triumph Town and Country saloon and then the Austin Westminster for another new lantern battery, which the Taycol would destroy in about 20 intermittent minutes of left, centre, right, centre from the REP single channel gear. How I wish I still had that, but it was stolen. The REP, that is, the Taycol remains, restored and cleaned and like new again waiting to go back in the boat. I finally decided I should finish it. My wife bought me a set of white metal fittings by Yeoman out of IP Engineering, so I have no excuse. Not that I need one. It has suffered a bit over that half a century, losing odd panels, but they are easily remade and replaced. First, I had to clean out the insides of the detritus and loft life of decades. Vacuuming, scraping with a pointy thing and brushing with a stiff brush, followed by more vacuuming using a clever attachment that my dear wife thought might be useful and it was, being at least a dozen stiff, but small diameter tubes poking out of the end of a nozzle. It both pokes and nudges the old dirt and dust and sucks it away. After that the old thin mahogany deck planks, my friend thought to add in the late 60s were removed and saved where salvageable as I quite like them for trim on other boats. The deck was rather brutalised with a coarse rasp and any loose nails punched back in flush or slightly below. Then some way too old, but still good, epoxy (WEST) was used to slar all over the decks and most of the insides, even some of the cabin sides. That will be finished before dark today. I can hardly believe the epoxy still works, but it does, perfectly and so is pressed into use. In this warm weather it set very quickly. I did my usual trick of squeegeeing it on into the grain with an old credit card or Gummi, which is a sample block of silicon. Styrene will also do. I use some spare 2mm stuff I was given (that guy at IP Engineering again). The roofs had already been corrected the other evening and heavily cellulose sanding sealed. The forward cabin removeable roof was unwarped by having a tight fitting diagonal piece of pear pressed in under the top skin and glued. The new hatch on that roof was made and the shape of the roof and hatch runners changed slightly, as per drawings from this site. Here are pics. of the work today. The above resinning, the remade cabin panels a new wheelhouse bulkhead and the tow hook base panel, finally a new aft cockpit rear coaming which it never had but should have. Cheers, Martin

Fire Float info. by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Thanks, Colin. I figured if it was a folding mast, why does the picture of one in the up position show it in front of the wheelhouse? When the thing that's laying down would only erect on top of the wheelhouse. Would that light colour be a typical off white of the period? Martin

wheelhouse amd bridge by deepdiver Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Alan Thanks Fred

wheelhouse amd bridge by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Yes, PM is OK Fred

wheelhouse amd bridge by deepdiver Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Alan Good to see you back, I like your use of plastic card covered in wood to build the wheelhouse, it must've made it more easy to glue the corners than to try making it all out of wood. can I P/M you later as I could do with some help with regard to fitting the motors. Fred

wheelhouse amd bridge by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
I don't have any photo's of the building of this, so I will try to explain. I cut all the pieces for the wheelhouse out of 1mm plasticard, the pieces were then fitted together with masking tape to make sure that they all fitted neatly together. The windows were then cut out of Perspex and their positions marked and put aside. The floor of the wheelhouse was planked along with the rear wall, the five side pieces were then wooded (for want of a better word) light oak for the frames with teak for the infills, the windows were checked to make sure they still fitted. The whole lot was fitted together with masking tape and glue run down the seams with a small brush. After drying the outside of the wheelhouse was wooded 😁 over lapping the windows by a couple of thou, the windows were glued in place with canopy glue. Aft of the wheelhouse are the battery boxes, these were made out of plasticard with doors made out of wood, kiss buttons used for the door knobs. Two sliding doors were made out of wood, small plastic channel for the runners. The bridge was made using the same principal as the boat deck.

Duke of Cornwall by Neil-S Seaman   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 51"/7000g Duke of Cornwall Capable of 4mph and a runtime of 30mins Twin Propellors (3 Blade 20mm) Direct Drive to a Torpedo x 2 (3 Blade) Powered by Lead Acid (12v) 6Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Electrinize (5Amps) ESC - Comments: This was a static scratch built model constructed by a model engineer probably in 1970s, I was gifted the boat by the local RNLI Branch with the proviso I looked after it and occasionally displayed it on Flag Days. The boat is a model of the Lizard and Cadgwith lifeboat 'Duke of Cornwall' which saw service for 20 years and saved 95 lives. I have fitted 6 channel San,wa remote control and the Torpedo engines and batteries. She runs very well on the water and achieves a good scale speed when both motors are at full power. Batteries are 12 volt gel type and new, I have never had a problem with endurance. Control is by two Electronize speed controllers which plug in independently to receiver. She has a two tone siren, worked from retract servo switch, which is useful for clearing a way through birds. Steering (like the real thing) was rather sluggish, a single blade rudder but it improves by using the two engines. She is pretty heavy to lift into the car, I use nylon strops to lower her into water. I have done several adjustments to her topside so that she more correctly resembles the 1962 Barnett lifeboat she is modelled on, main adjustment was to put mahogany veneer onto to forward and rear bulwarks, as the originals had. The original boat topside was painted grey and it was only later that areas were painted orange, she is a non self righting lifeboat one of the last of this type and modifications were made in the mid sixties to seal off the rear doors and provide a watertight compartment, as well as fully enclosing the wheelhouse (the model's wheelhouse is open at the rear, as was the original. All hatches and doors open. The railings are chain link and seem to be a very good match to the ones fitted. My only issue at the moment is the radio wires which seem to be very vulnerable, have used electric thread but not a great solution - something to look out for. I have purchased 3 crew and am about to paint them, two will be in the wheelhouse.