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>> Home > Tags > white metal

white metal
gloss white
white metal
Vintage Aero Kit Crash Tender by CB90 Lieutenant   Posted: 10 days ago
Brought this vintage Aero Kits RAF Crash Tender for £50 from Newcastle area, it is the 34in version. To my surprise at home I found that it had a Bullet 30 motor installed these motors were the top drawer motor of early fast electrics and its the only one I've ever seen, it can run on 24v and pull around 15A giving 300w not bad for a brushed motor. due to the power of this motor I have modified the hull under the water line with turn fins and trim tabs to reduce torque roll and improve turning stability, the underside is incorrect already as it only has one propshaft, where the original had two and I believe that both props turned in the same direction. The Pictures here show some of the work in progress I have remounted the motor and added a speed controller rated at 24v I have remade the stern compartment and rudder gear under it. I have blocked windows and foamed the front half of the boat. made missing parts and repaired delaminating ply. Note old ply is not as good as modern, the glue is not as water resistant. Have painted the hull and have just ordered the decals from Cornwall model Boats :- The 34in is 1/16 scale Fitting can be brought but many are cast white metal and can add weight to the boat, I have made two water cannons and plan to buy plastic fittings from this site. This has turned out to be a task that is difficult to assess how much effort and money to spend on a hull that has been built by someone else (say no more). Have just finished the steps for the stern compartment.

Fire boat by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 16 days ago
Hi Kevin. Welcome to the forum. A resin fittings kit for the 1:16 (34.5 inch) fireboat is available from SLEC: They are made from styrene and are consequently won't add too much additional weight. There is also a white metal fitting kit available from Model Slipway: This set looks more comprehensive and will add a bit more weight but will be much sturdier. Not forgetting the range of 1:16 fittings available from the 'Model Shop' on this site.👍 I hope that's helpful. Robbob.

Bondo the keel! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 30 days ago
Mornin' Ed, Not surprised that this is your last Dumas kit🤔 I recently bought the Deans Marine kit of HMS Manxman, a WW2 fast cruiser / minelayer, 1:96 53". It has a superb fibreglass hull that I can't fault and hundreds of cast resin, brass and white metal bits n pieces 😲 On the other hand the drawing supplied is a bit limited, but no sweat as I have several detail photos of the original anyway😉 Rather that way round than like Dumas! Attached are a few pics from the build instructions (there are hundreds on a CD). Good luck with the rest of your build👍 😎

Thurl pin rack by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi all I have just spoken to Brian at Mobile Marine and he advised the term was based on a very old English name for belaying pins. Basically its a wooden plank with holes for the belaying pins and fastened in a raised position to the deck. The shrouds are wrapped in a figure of eight round the belaying pins which in an emergency can be knocked out to release. They are used on the davit fixings, not the mast. I have small hooks on the shrouds to the bulwarks and on the fore mast fitting. My model requires the top cabin to be removable so I have made a fixing out of wire that can be quickly released from the white metal fitting on both sides.

Thurl pin rack by deepdiver Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Alan I dont know if you have read this,7930.... the other link to a write up on Lady T is this one I hope the links works, they are by Footski. yes I have read that some of MMM white metal parts do need a lot of work to make them look good, Dave M on this site has also done the Lady "T" I have uploaded a photo of the label from the inside of my Lady "T", as you can see I have had her for some time now and I have only just started to lay out the internal parts. Fred

Thurl pin rack by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Thanks for the reply Fred. I have looked on MMM site and found the Thurl pin rack made in white metal, can't say that it appeals to me, so I am going to make my own. It's nice of you and Doug to take an interest and I appreciate it, it's a very nice model but there is a lot of work involved in the woodwork and making of the bits. Thanks again Alan

Decks removed by deepdiver Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
Now that the decks are removed I was then able to see how all the running gear was placed and fixed, I was in luck as the original builder had use a 300 type motor x 2 and had not gone down the servo motor route, I removed all the running gear alone with the electrics that was in place, I now turned my attention to the shafts, as they were fixed in place I felt that it would do more damage to remove them and replace them with new, it is a shame that the prop's are plastic I just may well look at replacing them at a later date. I now looked at the rudders and as they are of white metal I felt that they would be O.K.

TRENT LIFE BOAT by dragon Commander   Posted: 3 months ago
Been on hold for awhile while working on Al Khubar. Time to finish it you may have seen it at Haydock (OWLS). Running gear and electrics all working and has been sailed no leaks, Deck railings and all the white metal bits need doing along with a coat of paint to the deck. Superstructure and Fly Bridge need fittings and painting. Lots to keep me going for a while. More to come as I progress.

Huntsman fittings kit. by Novagsi0 Captain   Posted: 6 months ago
yep that's the one I was looking at !!!! still undecided if it really work £18 but I wanted to see what you get again. So I could price single items up or just scratch build the easy bits and just but the white metal castings. Many thanks again all.

Some more Cordene time - at last! by ThatSinkingFeeling Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 8 months ago
After a slight pause (6 months since last post 😱) have finally found some time between family and work commitments to push things forward a bit. A bit short on workspace at the moment as garage and office is chocca (Hi Dad - when we move house can you look after some stuff for us...?) so have spent some time practicing battery charging, and setting all the electrics and basic R/C controls up on a little test rig. The blue support for the prop drive shaft is a bit of a clip-on folder binder strip I stole. The shaft is held perfectly. I'll keep this in reserve as a possible means of mounting things in the hull, when the time comes. I have a 2000mAh Nimh battery powering a 10A Deans marine ESC. The receiver is a Devolution Devo RX1002, the servo an Align DS520 (both salvaged from my foray in to the lunacy that is R/C helicopters). The motor is a Deans marine KYTE. Just messing with the white metal prop for now, will obviously use the nice shiny brass one I bought on the proper build.

The electrics, drive & radio by Rookysailor Lieutenant   Posted: 9 months ago
Hi Rob, Many thanks for the info on the filling points, I did get a set of white metal fittings from Mike at VMW, but did not get an info sheet as to where they go,Mike kindly supplied me with many information sheets though, now I see yours, I will amend my Fireboat, but still not as perfect as yours,excellent workmanship.

Building a deck by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 9 months ago
I began laying the deck on April 5th. It had snowed as recently as the week before, but it finally warmed up enough to use glue. The strips were cut to 6-5/8" length, about 20' in 1:36 scale. I used a black marker on two opposite sides to represent the pitch in the seams. The deck was laid in a 5-plank pattern to mix up the butt-joints as much as I could. My research on her decking found she's had various styles and plank widths over her life. The earliest photo showing her deck that I could find, showed it straight planked with 7 or 8" wide boards based on the number of planks between her waterway and the main hatch coaming. Her waterway logs seem to be placed ON the decking, as there's no margin planks or joggling - even today. The planking was set with gel CA. Gorilla sells it in a nice bottle with a metal pin in the cap to keep the spout open. It would up taking 3 of these bottles to complete the deck. The planks are cut at a 45 on the ends along the fore and aft access hatches, to try and hide this seam as much as possible. Once the deck was down, I scraped it. The glue is more resistant than the basswood is, so sanding would have scalloped the wood between seams. Scraping makes everything level. Some lite sanding, more to polish than remove anything, was done last. I had planned to stain the deck a very light grayish tint, but an active naval vessel gets holy-stoned regularly and wouldn't be gray as the ships that sit at a dock today are. In all it took 455 pieces to complete the deck and there wasn't any scrap longer than 1 inch left over. In all I have 3/4" deck beams, 1/4" plywood, a layer of 4oz cloth and resin, and a 3/16" basswood deck - I don't recall why I designed it so heavy, but it certainly doesn't hurt the model at all, and I think the 3/16" square strip will prove to have been easier to set than the 1/16" x 1/4" planks Pride and Macedonian will get. The deck go a coat of water-based satin poly, and I stared working on hatch coamings, cap log, and waterways. The cabin skylight and two hatched forward of it, including the capstan, and all combined into one hatch where the battery is accessed, and which hides the aft ballast rod and main power switch. The cap logs Are 1/2" wide x 1/4" tall basswood that was tren'led, glued, and copper nailed, onto the deck, flush with the outside of the hull covering this seam completely. The the angled wood waterways were installed around the inside of the cap log, and the deck got a coat of oil-based satin poly. This actually leeched in and made the marker seams bleed a little. In hind sight, I think I'll go with paint over marker for seams in the future. The coamings got painted black. I'm not sure why the Navy painted deck fittings black. It was even common to paint to top surfaces of tops black. I wonder how many injuries and losses this cost the navy that white paint would have prevented. Anyway... Constellation didn't have "solid" bulwarks, but rather she had hammock irons bolted to her cap log. These were removed when Baltimore tried to pass her off as a frigate and tossed in the bilge. When the ship was restored as a sloop of war, they found all but one. These irons are designed to have wooden rails at their tops, inboard and out, and have holes so several lines can be run through them. The Navy in it's wisdom though, decided to wainscot them to appear as solid bulwarks, despite the additional splinter hazard that would be in battle. I wasn't making all those metal stanchions just to hide them under wood and tarps, so I made wood blocks sheathed in sheet bass, scribed to look like vertical wainscotting. It was the end of April by now, and the Baltimore Port Expo was in two weeks. I wanted to have hammocks in the bulwarks, as she appears in the portrait, but there was no time to figure this out, so I layered on some balsa and shaped it so it looked like tarps were laid over the hammocks. When I figure out how I'll represent the stowed hammocks, I can pull the balsa off easily enough. The bulwarks on, I made some fittings for the spencer masts; installed the eye bolts at the base of the masts; made some bollards (or whatever name they gave those posts), made and installed the catheads, which are laminated 1/16" basswood. I then started setting up a jury rig and her controls so she could sail at the Port Expo. I set her t'gallants and all three heads'ls this time around. By the night before the Expo, she was ready to go.

The Anchor. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 months ago
I had previously assembled and primed the anchor, having added a little additional detail to the white metal castings, as described in a previous blog update. I subsequently added some plasticard pieces to the arm of the anchor to thicken it slightly so that I could fit a small brass shackle as a finishing detail. The final paint finish is Tamiya gunmetal metallic to match some other deck fittings. The anchor is held in place on the foredeck by a small double sided adhesive foam pad beneath the anchor base and the mounting pad it sits on. The base and arm is also retained on two other mounting pads buy couple of ‘staples’ that were formed by heating and bending some thin Plasticard rod into shape and they are just a push fit into some holes drilled into the mounting pads. The fixings are quite secure but as with many other items of deck furniture it can be easily removed for maintenance or repair. Sorry this is not a particularly exciting or interesting post but the next will be the suction hoses and fittings which were quite a challenge and will hopefully be a great deal less boring 😜

The Kent Clearview screen by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 months ago
There is a white metal ‘ring’ supplied in the kit for the Kent Clearview screen but it is too large and doesn’t look particularly ‘scale’. So after some research on the web and some help from other forum members I found enough information to make one from scratch. The outer ring was made from a narrow section of pvc pipe that I had to hand and this was cut to length in a mitre block and then sanded down to the right thickness on some abrasive paper and then sprayed matt black. I didn’t use the perspex screen supplied in the kit as the hole was too large but the small circular cut-out piece was the right diameter to fit into the ring that I made, the new screen was cut from a new piece of perspex sheet and a hole drilled through the centre to locate the rotating part of the screen. The parts were assembled onto the new screen using canopy glue applied very sparingly with a dressmaking pin. The motor drive assembly on the inside of the screen and the black triangular part that sits on the outside of the screen were made from some black plasticard and these parts were also fixed in place with canopy glue. I used a brass panel pin with the head filed down and painted black for the central bearing of the screen but when I applied a very small amount of canopy glue to fix it capillary action unexpectedly drew the glue between the two ‘panes’ of perspex 😡 Not what I wanted to happen but I decided to leave it to dry to it’s clear state and then assess the situation. Fortunately the glue is not too conspicuous to be much of a concern but it is nevertheless an unwanted blemish that I will have to accept 😭 The finished piece was then glued into the wheelhouse with a few dots of canopy glue and looks quite good as long as you don’t look too closely 😎

The boat hooks. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 months ago
I stumbled on the boat hooks whilst scouring eBay for some other bits and bobs, they came as a set of three but the poles were too short to be scale accurate but I bought a set anyway and replaced the supplied poles with some 3mm mahogany dowel of the right scale length. The hooks themselves are made of white metal and are quite delicate so some care was needed in cleaning them up for painting. I etch primed them first and then brush painted them with some silver metallic acrylic before epoxy fixing them to the poles which I had sprayed with a satin finish lacquer. The retaining brackets were made from some 22 gauge brass cut into a 3mm strip and formed into a lipped retainer. These brackets were pierced to take a 1mm brass dome head pin which was soft soldered in place and then etch primed and brush painted with ‘gun metal’ grey acrylic. A 1mm hole was drilled into the cabin sides in the correct positions according to the drawings and the brackets glued in place. The brackets retain the poles quite firmly and I think they give the boat some interesting detail 😁