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>> Home > Tags > wind

wind
wind
Sea Hornet by canabus Lieutenant   Posted: 4 hours ago
Hi Jim I will be watching this built very close, as I have built one from original plans and also did the 25% as a future project. Because of the very limited engine and radio hatch, I design them larger, but, you are on the right path. I installed a 28mm brushless motor, 3S 2650mah Lipo battery with a 2 blade 32mm brass prop. I don't think the 25% bigger a one would require any more power as it a rocket. My hatches run down the deck planking lines, the original hatches are only for show. The engine starts from the front seat and finishes at the rear windscreen. I made up the cockpit floors etc. before I skinned the sides, a lot easier, also the floor is split over the keel with the seats one piece. Can-a-bus Canabus

On Public Display by Jerry Todd Lieutenant   Posted: 5 hours ago
This would be the first time I ever put something on public display. Well, some drawings went up in a high school art show, but this was certainly the first model. The Port Expo had set up a pool on the dock next to the N.S. Savannah. It was windy, with the wind whipping around the ship every which way. The pool wasn't deep enough for the model to sail, so she just sat there tied off to one end, or down in the lee corner. Not a big deal, but I got to talk to a few folks about her, and that was fun. One of the other modelers told me about the model expo at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St Michaels Maryland, in just two weeks! Last time I had been to that museum I went on a 170 foot barkentine, this time the boat would be a little smaller. There was no way I was going to get much work done on the model in the time I had, but there was something I wanted to try out. From the start I had a sail-arm servo set-up to handle the fore-and-aft sails, but I hadn't worked out how it would work. The heads'ls over-lapped and each had two sheets. When the model come-about, the heads'ls needed to be hauled over the stays to the other side. When sailing a real boat, like my 16 footer 'Lydia,' it's the same thing. When you start to come about, you cast-off the jib sheet. As the boat comes across the wind, the jib luffs and comes across mostly on it own. The the new sheet is hauled in and made fast. I wanted to emulate that on the model. My solution was two loose arms with the servo arm between them. The servo pushes one or the other of the loose arms to sheet the heads'ls - but not both. Center the servo and both jib-sheets are slack. It's incredibly simple and works on a single servo. I cobbled the system together in time for St Michaels. We also got one of those pop-up tents, and a folding table. I was taking the Pride of Baltimore model, and the Macedonian hull as well. I was getting into this public display thing. The Model Expo was great. There were a boat-load of modeler's and model there. The pool was much larger, but it was still too shallow, and Stella ran aground after sailing only a few feet. Only Constellation went in the water, but all three models got a lot of attention and I spent a lot of time talking to folks about them. The jib-sheeter worked great, though the servo only had 90° of travel and the Dx6 isn't programmable that way. When I got home, I went right to work on another control mechanism I wanted to try - the sliding-winch.

Sailing for the First Time by Jerry Todd Lieutenant   Posted: 2 days ago
In April 2011 I set a deadline to sail the model for the first time on July 10th. I had places to go and other things to get done, so I figured that was far enough ahead to have her ready in time. There were a lot of things that needed to get done if the model was going to sail; * Shape the still rough cut yards; fore course, fore tops'l, crossjack, and mizzen tops'l yards. * Complete the yard trusses with mast bands and banding to attach them to the yards * A gammon "iron" for the bowsprit. * Rudder control & steering. * New winch drum for braces (the originals with wood drums warped badly). * Sails for planned sailing suit; 3 tops'ls, spanker, and jib. She was basically jury-rigged, with all three course yards linked together to a single winch. July 9th's forcaste was for perfect weather, light northerly wind, blowing up the creek so if there was a problem, the model would drift back to me. Unfortunately, I wasn't ready by the 9th and the 10th was light, variable, fluky, 90°, and humid. The top mast fids were pulled and the topmasts lowered. The model with some tools, her ballast, and what I thought I might need were all placed in the truck the night before. The radio and main batter were put on charge. Next day we drove the couple of block down the street to the Sloop Cove public dock on Stoney Creek. The rig was raised, ballast attached, electronics connected and tested, and she went into the water. With her ballast and extra lead I had she still sat 2" high in the water. I set her out, but the iffy light wind sent he back, then she threatened to get tangled with a powerboat on a lift until I managed to squeek her out into open water. She sailed a bit, but just when she'd get moving the wind would shift or reflect off something and catch her aback. Then suddenly she stopped responding at all. Something of a gust caught her and she headed for a dock. I headed over, which meant swimming, and not being a great swimmer realized I should have brought my flotation vest from my sailboat along. It being so hot, the swim wasn't exactly unwelcome, but it was a lot of work. The model sailed right into the end of a dock about 100 feet away, bounced on her forestay, and basically parked there. I got her back to shore looking like a drowned cat myself, but there was no damage at all to the model. As it turned out, the main battery failed.

what fittings for a plane prop by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
Hi Chris and Sonar I bought mine at the Blackpool Show and Brian offered me the top at the same time. I believe he intends to make a part kit in time and the top I and my friend have were from the development stage. Perhaps if you give them a ring and speak to Ann or Brian they will also sell you the top. Certainly makes for a strong boat and is relatively quick to build if you have model aircraft experience. There are running formers on the base so they help keep the model relatively straight in the water. Great fun especially if there is no wind for the yachts or the weed is being problematic. Dave

Gentlemans Cruiser by muddy Captain   Posted: 8 days ago
Started on the upper-works/cabin. Ring saw came into its own again. Followed up by the small mini drill, similar to a Dremil but with a bigger chuck which is handy, using Dremil 1/2" drum sander to clean up the window inner edges. Used 1.5mm ply for the cabin sides as they are going to be veneered, found a pice of veneer under the bench it nearly had roots, and i think, think, it's Teak. This was all glued up under weight using a PVA glue, probably the one in the pics, but an Alphatic. then when glue well and truly dry, Using a No10 scalpel blade to remove the innards of the window frames, and a quick swish with some fine grade sandpaper, not sure about any window frames as yet. ( to many windows for me ... ! ) Regards Muddy....

JOLIE BRISE gaff-rigged cutter by lesliebreame Lieutenant   Posted: 12 days ago
lovely boat and goes nicely when the wind picks up !!

The suction hoses – part 2. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
The next piece I tackled was the bulkhead connector to which the assembled hose is connected. This is not a particularly complex piece but I had to engineer it’s attachment to the bulkhead to allow for easy removal. As with the suction pickup I added four short pieces of brass as turning handles to the ‘cover cap’ for the want of a better description, this cap would be undone to reveal the male connector of the pump intake and the cap would have a retaining chain. This chain would presumably be attached to the bulkhead in some way but I needed it to attach to the base of the fitting. I drilled a hole through the spigot on the cover cap and formed a loop from some brass wire for the chain attachment. Similarly I drilled the base and made another wire loop for the chain attachment there. I didn’t have any suitable chain so I thought I would have a go at making some by winding about 20 turns of brass wire around a piece of thin brass rod which I then cut through lengthwise with a hacksaw to produce some brass loops. These loops were then flattened, linked and closed to form the chain and a short length of the finished chain attached to the fitting. Very fiddly work and a test of the eyesight 🤓 As mentioned, I needed to make the fitting easily removable without using screws or a threaded stud as it needs to be removed without tools to allow the cockpit floor to be lifted out. To achieve this I put a 3mm thread into the rear of the fitting and then threaded a piece of 3mm brass rod to go into that. I made a retainer to go into the bulkhead that would provide a friction fit for the hose connector. This was made from a short length of 3mm I/D brass tube set into another short supporting piece of 4mm I/D tube and a piece of 14 swg brass plate, all the parts were silver soldered together with the 3mm tube protruding the plate by the thickness of the bulkhead. The 3mm tube was cut crossways to form some ‘fingers’ that will grip the 3mm shaft of the fitting. To provide extra grip I used a piece of rubber sleeve and a small pipe clip over the ‘fingers’. This piece was glued into a 4mm hole in the bulkhead with the end of the tube flush with the bulkhead. The hose connecter is then pushed into this retainer with a firm friction grip but is easily removed without any tools. Definitely getting the hang of working with brass now 😁 Still not inclined to by a lathe though 😜 The remaining fittings should be a lot easier...I hope.

Fairplay X - Plastic Magic! :-) by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
Hi, I 'solved' the 'wife problem' over 20 years ago! 😉 Now I have a GF who has her own apartment. So half my kitchen is kitchen and the other half workshop. Coffee machine and microwave is never far away 😊 Also a bench for the rough stuff in my small cellar. For spraying: I do the big stuff, hulls etc, on the terrace which is partially covered. For the small stuff I have a mini-spray-booth, about 50x40x30cm, with an extractor fan and hose I can hang out the window! So I guess I'm not so badly off😉 Still have TOO MUCH STUFF though !! "Stuff expands to fill the space available for it"! Must be explained somewhere in Einstein's theories 😉 Cheers Doug😎

JOLIE BRISE gaff-rigged cutter by Dom of Essential RC Lieutenant   Posted: 15 days ago
This fantastic model was scratch built by John of the Solent Radio Controlled Model Boat Club. Here it is seen sailing in light winds on Setley Pond in the New Forest, UK. She took about a year to construct and is now into the third year of sailing. The boat is based on the period 1929/34 when "Bobby" Somerset owned her, he won the Fastnet race twice and finished second once, infact she is the only boat to win the Fastnet three times. She is based on the river Hamble and is owned by Dauntseys school in Wiltshire and is regularly raced by the pupils there. The model is approximately 1:15 scale. In 2013 the full size Jolie Brise celebrated the centenary anniversary of her construction by the Paumelle yard in Le Havre in 1913. The world famous, gaff-rigged pilot cutter was the last boat to carry the royal mail under sail and has won the Fastnet Race three times, including the inaugural race in 1925. In 2015 and 2016 she was the overall winner of the Tall Ships Races. Jolie Brise is owned, maintained and sailed by the pupils of Dauntsey's School. For more information about Jolie Brise go to, www.joliebrise.com (apologies...just seen this vid was already posted by Dave M😁)

a very noisy fireboat by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 18 days ago
Hoylake is just close Dave, and you can park close, its usually quiet, so for testing etc its fine, just a bit small for the bigger scale boats. New Brighton is very busy on these light evenings, parking can be a problem in summer. My other local lake is gautby, a superb lake, big, easy access to all sides, but its not in the best of places. I could go over to Newsham in Liverpool, but you run the risk of kids again, and fishermen, hence Hoylake! and if the wind is down, I can fly on the beach! Paul

Design bits by tomarack Lieutenant   Posted: 19 days ago
Hi, CLR - Center of lateral resistance - its size is given by the lateral surface of the submerged part of the ship.   Lateral. [Latina], surface area - total submerged surface of the side elevation of the vessel-- Center of lateral is important for determining the balance of sailing considering wind pressure. Please forgive me some minor translation problems .. Tom

Victoria by Skipper44 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 20 days ago
[Score: 5/10] 39" Victoria Capable of 2mph and a runtime of 100mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 40mm) Belt to a Graupner 600 Speed (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (7.2v) 4Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Mtroniks viper Marine (15Amps) ESC - Comments: She is a 100cm long barge like ship, weighs too much to carry around easily so she doesn't see as much use as one may hope. She has a draught of around two inches and a bow thruster. This is complemented by a working anchor windlass and lights.

wheelhouse by GrahamP74 Lieutenant   Posted: 22 days ago
The mould was made by Andy at Models by Design. I managed to aquire the plans of a GM 33 with the internal layout for the wheel house. I have copied it in the main! The cooker does swing! I downloaded images of radars and radio fronts and stuck them onto painted PVA board. I used poster paint mixed with 50% PVA glue to paint the interior. The window surrounds were made from thin PVA board and the attached to the inside and out to replecate the sealed metal unit. The door slides on runners.

The window glazing & frames. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
??....not sure I understand you comment but thanks anyway 👍

The window glazing & frames. by Inkoust Admiral   Posted: 25 days ago
Luxurious work, I have not seen a man so muddy for a long time. Hats off. Zdeněk