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>> Home > Tags > window

window
windows
window
The window glazing & frames. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 hours ago
??....not sure I understand you comment but thanks anyway 👍

The window glazing & frames. by Inkoust Admiral   Posted: 11 hours ago
Luxurious work, I have not seen a man so muddy for a long time. Hats off. Zdeněk

The window glazing & frames. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 hours ago
Hi Boatshed. I have been using a product called 'Procan', I don't recall offhand where I bought it but it's clearly a very similar to the Deluxe product, please excuse the pun 😜

The window glazing & frames. by BOATSHED Commander   Posted: 13 hours ago
What glue are you using for the windows ?? I haven't used a up to now but I purchased this for gluing in windows. deluxe materials glue & glaze

The window glazing & frames. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
A full set of laser cut perspex windows is supplied in the VMW kit along with corresponding frames for all and they are all a pretty good fit in the window apertures of the engine room, forward cabin and wheel house rear walls, only requiring a light easing with a file for a secure fit. I left the protective film on the screens whilst gluing them in place with a very small amount of canopy glue applied to the window edges with a dressmaking pin and pressed into place so that they were flush with the outside of the cabin walls. The wheelhouse windows were a bit trickier as they are glued to the inside face of the panels and I had to remove the protective film around the edges of the outer face of the windows by running a fine sharp blade around the window aperture with the perspex held in place by hand. Canopy glue was then used very sparingly on the face of the perspex and the windows clamped in place. The central screen of the wheelhouse has the Kent Clearview in it and this needed to be carefully centred before fixing in place. When all had dried and set the protective films was peeled off to reveal nice clear ‘panes’ without any unsightly glue smudges. The CNC cut window frames are made from a flexible plastic material with accurate and well defined edges. They were all given a light sanding with abrasive paper as a key for the paint and were then laid out on a large piece of card paying particular attention to getting them the correct side up, in particular the wheelhouse frames which are ‘handed’ for either port or starboard. They were all held to the board with small pads of double sided foam tape and sprayed with two coats of Halfords metallic silver paint followed by two light coats of Halfords gloss lacquer. After a couple of days to dry they were removed from the board and fixed in place with canopy glue applied with a pin as very small dots around the inside face, aligned with masking tape ‘guides’ and a straight edge and then held in place with small tabs of masking tape. The installation of the glazing in the wheelhouse was made a lot easier because I had previously cut away some of the bulkhead and rear wall to give better access to the wheelhouse interior for detailing. This is not mentioned in the building instructions but is well worth doing for all the above reasons 😁

URLs /Email addresses by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
You need to highlight the url and copy, then open a new window in your web browser and paste the url into the address space and click enter. The page should then open. if not check that you have copied all of the address and correct. It is best not to post personal emails on open forums. If you want to share your email its is safer to use a private message. Use the same procedure to copy and paste into your email address bar Cheers Dave

What is going on here? by Grandpa Lieutenant   Posted: 12 days ago
This large container ship just sailed in front of my hotel window, towing a tug boat, or so it appeared. But why? We are in Dobh, Ireland where the final boarding of passengers were taken aboard the Titanic. A lot of history in the waters of this Harbour in front of our hotel.

More work on the Solent Lifeboat by Mataroa Admiral   Posted: 14 days ago
HI heres some pics the work I was doing on the superstructure i replace the roof on the superstructure and all so i replace the windows on the wheelhouse .Theres a lot of work still to be done on the superstructure.

Using old motors by Westquay Captain   Posted: 25 days ago
Doug, that looks lovely. I can't guarantee the performance would be anything but sedate with the Target, but that kind of boat in the real world would rarely be seen exceeding about 10 knots if that. It's essentially a river boat. I would be inclined to keep with the scheme it has as it's nicely period with the off white. Maybe line the deck with a Rotring a la period too and veneer the coach house sides. I certainly wouldn't strip it as there'll be joints and filler and boring old plywood underneath. No, paint is the Aerokits look for sure Delamination needs only epoxy, either the repair and build stuff or the liquid a la West, SP, etc.. slide a knife in the delamination and convince some epoxy in, then lightly clamp it twixt layers of greaseproof paper (when the GF's out) or plastic bag or similar. I use Plastikard, but I was given a box of lasered off cuts by Ivan at the Vintage Boat Company. He's now sold out to SLEC who are even nearer where I live! Anyway I have plasticard in three thicknesses to waste. If you stroke the surface with a scriber, it will make a weird hollow noise if delaminated. If it is, make a cut, persuade the edges up and insinuate some epoxy into the crack you've made. Ain't nuttn. you can't repair. You should have seen the window frames in my house when I sold it. A festival of epoxy, firewood and P38 car filler. Surveyor passed it with barely a look. Reallygood paint saved the day. Stupid waster! 400 quid Mr. Client, chching! As for the extra gizmos, I'd ditch them to save weight and complexity. You might find a 3 blade prop works better, but I'm no expert there. Finally instead of "this belongs to", I'd simply name her Jessica, in a nice script. I hope that helps. Cheers, Martin

Wheelhouse for Emily P II by GrahamP74 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 25 days ago
[Score: 5/10] - Comments: I ordered a Cygnus wheelhouse from Models by Design. Windows and door cut out. I have constructed the interior out of 2.5mm PVA board which I will paint to replicate wood. I will be adding a sink and a small cooker to the galley on the aft wall. I have cut the cooker area out but still have to cut the sink.

The boat hooks. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 26 days ago
I'm very flattered by your kind remarks, it's been quite an enjoyable process and I've learnt a lot about model boat building and quite a few new skills too. The boat is getting quite near to completion now, just a few more things on the list to do: The windows and frames, Kent clearview screen, anchor & mounting, mast & rigging, suction hoses, interior & exterior lighting and installing the propulsion and radio kit. Once all the heavy stuff is on board I will be able to get the all-up weight and put it in the test tank (bath) to see if she actually floats 😲!!. I'm hoping that it sits somewhere close to the waterline on the hull, might need some ballasting ?, won't really know until the maiden voyage. I hope you have been successful in finding a buyer for all your kit, I was really looking forward to seeing your build blog. Best wishes and get well soon. Rob.

Ketch Irene by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
The cunning plan for the sails. Heming & stitching is difficult to get anywhere near to scale, unless the scale is large. So I experimented with the flying jib, worked very well. Except I have the bolt rope on the wrong side. I had tried this on glass before but the glue puddled showing badly. Using the Paper pattern cut out the cloth ( I use ticking) With at least 1/2" all around. Mine was washed & ironed. This was because it has been folded in a drawer since the last boat. Cut 4 Teflon blocks & drilled 2 holes ( Teflon cut from an old chopping board). A panel pin through holes one up one down. Place paper pattern on a board, nail the blocks so the nail sticking up is on the point. The other nail is clear of pattern, this will allow the block to pivot. Wind a string that has been soaked in PVA (water resistant type) around the nails. The cloth is slightly dampened with a spray, not to much or it will be to heavy & also the glue could run. Push the nails up through the cloth letting it sag again not to much. When dry remove it from board, cut off the excess cloth as tight as possible to the string. I then mark the panels with pencil. I do this on both sides, after the first side I tape it to the window so I can see & get them the same. Then give sail a coat of very watery coat of PVA, some mixed with acrylic paint. Seen on my model Flying Foam I had over done it a bit.

Kent windscreen. by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
There are details on ebay of modern clear view screens try http://nor-mek.com/ style='background-color:yellow;'>window/clear.html for a good detailed drawing with measurements. Dave

FELIX by Inkoust Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Kit German port boat. The drive motor 500, LIPO 4000 mA. Hilarious kit from Crick. Combination of ABS and timber. Everything needed for the position of the boat is the content of the kit. Still under construction. Painted hull and superstructure, glazed windows, left mast and lighting.

Deck fittings, portholes and a door knob ! by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Now that the painting is finished I can start putting on some of the white metal deck fittings. I had previously cleaned these up with a file and wire wool and sprayed them all with etch primer, some were drilled to take threaded studs to fix them through the deck or as a reinforcement for epoxy glue fixing into the deck, and some pierced to take a short fixing pin. The chain pipe was drilled out to make it look more realistic. They were all brush painted with some Tamiya metallic acrylic paint, I chose ‘gun metal’ for this as I want to paint some other fittings and window frames with a metallic silver finish as a contrast. The portholes were painted with the same colour as the cabin sides and glazed with the perspex that was supplied with the kit, 'canopy glue' was used for this as I read that cyano glue would 'mist' the plastic. Another small detail I thought to add was a brass knob for the cabin door, this was hand turned from some brass rod and drilled out to take a 2mm threaded stud for fixing through the door. A nice little finishing detail I think, and I'm quite enjoying working with brass 😁