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>> Home > Tags > wiring

wiring
wiring
Proximity (Hall effect) sensor wiring by Escrich Apprentice   Posted: 5 days ago
Of you want to use a magnet, of course forget the Hall effect semiconductor, best, as appointed, is to use reed relays, looks a good idea to use a screw and a motor to remove the main fuse, place a second reed to make the motor put on place the fuse again

Proximity (Hall effect) sensor wiring by timgarrod Lieutenant   Posted: 5 days ago
Hi, what sub are you building as i'm making magnetic power on/off switch if there space in the WTC. cheers Tim

Proximity (Hall effect) sensor wiring by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Fair comment.😉 Ciao, Doug 😎

Proximity (Hall effect) sensor wiring by Haverlock Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
While I accept you had that in mind not everyone would realise the situation. Stating the obvious needs to be done on occasions.

Proximity (Hall effect) sensor wiring by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Hi Haverlock, Quite correct. Nobody said it did! We took it as read that for operation main power drive would be connected and disconnected at the end of the run. Preferably by removing a fuse in the positive lead. Batteries should not be left connected in models anyway.😉 Cheers, Doug 😎

Proximity (Hall effect) sensor wiring by Haverlock Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
switching off and on via the ESC switch does NOT disconnect the battery from the ESC just stops the ESC passing current. Power is still being used. The only way to end all current flow is to disconnect the batter by either opening the pos or neg lead from the battery. Mounting the magnet on the end of a screw and having that fit into a threaded hole should deal with the problem of keeping it in place while running.

Proximity (Hall effect) sensor wiring by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
Absolutely Steve 👍 Alternative is to make a holder for the magnet to prevent it getting knocked off by weeds etc. Also agree that any Failsafe' circuits must have an independent power supply. Place to put the switch, or latching relay, is definitely in place of the little slide switch usually supplied on the ESC. Just checked on some of my ESCs, Graupner and mTroniks, the red lead to the switch is NOT connected to the red lead supplying the RX and servos via the built in BEC. Guess the switch just triggers an FET switch inside the ESC. So the normal 500mA limit of reed switches will be enough. If a latching relay is used make sure the pull-in current is less than 500mA. Have fun All, cheers, Doug 😎 Eric; which sub is your mate building? I have a Type 1A U-Boat dynamic diver, speed and planes only, and a kit for an Akula 2 which will be a static diver, with tank etc.

Proximity (Hall effect) sensor wiring by steve-d Lieutenant   Posted: 11 days ago
If the intention is to switch on with the magnet then remove it then you will need the reed switch already mentioned plus a latching relay. In use you would apply the magnet which will switch the relay which in turn will switch the ESC. A second application of the magnet will unlatch the relay. Possible choice of relay. Relay https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/5v-12v-24V-Coil-Bistable-Latching... He would need to consider carefully that he still has power to the safety backup which will blow ballast a certain time after loss of signal. Steve

Proximity (Hall effect) sensor wiring by Haverlock Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 days ago
I do not know how much knowledge of electronics your friend has but I need to point out that a hall effect sensor is not like a relay. While they do act like a switch ( sort of) they need to be powered and have a hall effect voltage to switch. This would mean in the use intended there would be a current drain on the sensor and if the power supply ( battery?) voltage fell to far it would not function. The effect you want could be replaced by a reed relay cheap and simple to use. However reed relays can only pass low currents so would need to be cascaded with a higher rated relay before switching the main battery supply on and off. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/10-Pcs-2-5X14mm-3-Pin-4W-Glass-Re... these reed relays have both normally open and normally closed contacts and at a couple of quid for 10 worth buying so he can experiment.

Proximity (Hall effect) sensor wiring by Kipper Lieutenant   Posted: 13 days ago
Depends on how he has it wired up, is he using an Mtroniks esc? if so these have an on/off switch & bec, so he could replace this switch with the proximity one.

Proximity (Hall effect) sensor wiring by EricMB Commander   Posted: 13 days ago
Hi all, a friend is building a submarine and wants to turn it on remotely with a proximity switch and magnet, he needs to know where to wire it in... I thought it should be into the positive wire from the battery - am I right? Thanks in advance, Eric

Ship rudders by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 16 days ago
Mornin' Toby, I'm back😁 Pardon the delay, just finished tidying up the wiring and final running tests on Colin's Taycol Supermarine motor and converter board - to make it run off a standard brushed ESC! The rivets look great👍 and the last pic was much better as well😊 Soooo many rivets 😲 guess you have to do them in batches, and then go pull up a tree or something, or you'd go doolally 😡 And I thought I was patient doing all the portholes and stanchions on my 4' 6" 1936 destroyer - that was ONLY hundreds! Rivets? Didn't even contemplate that!! I think you should continue this in a proper Build Blog - there's lotsa good stuff you're doing here👍 And at the end you can make a pdf file of the whole story with just a few clicks😉 Be a nice memento👍 Look forward to the Launch Report. During my career I attended the launches of several naval ships I had worked on,designing the COMMS systems. The funniest one was a glass fibre minehunter at the Intermarine yard in Italy near La Spezia. The ship was still in dry dock, like a huge bath. They turned on the 'taps' and slowly up came the ship! Keep up the good work, cheers, Doug 😎 BTW; were you sitting on the saw to help keep awake? 😁😁

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Mornin' JB, Guess I'll have to remain 'agnostic' on this issue for now - I'm still to be convinced. This might explain a phenomenon I've noticed during testing of the Taycol Supermarine I've just renovated for Colin. More on that later in the 'Supermarine resurrection' blog. I'll do some experiments using my digital scope and see if I can trap and measure these elusive spikes for various wire lengths😉 Can't comment on the guy from Castle, don't know them, except to say that I found his comments a bit vague and without explanation. There are also contradictory posts on that link; some say before the ESC some after. Can't really see the point of putting the caps in front of the ESC, switching spikes SHOULD only appear on the output side I'll look at that on the scope, and after all a fuse to protect against fouled prop and jammed motor is standard fit between battery and ESC, or should be! So some wiring extension for that is essential. Also I would expect the battery to flatten any spikes that do appear at the ESC supply side. As you say the internals of several 'manufacturers' ESCs are often the same. Nothing new, branding and badge engineering has been going on for decades for all sorts of things and no RC kit manufacturer / distributor produces his own components. Important factors are; quality of his own assembly and where does he buy his components - originals or cheap copies? 28 ESCs! Wow 😲 and I thought I had a lot! As reported I have so far had good results with the Quicrun series, both brushed and brushless. Next one to test is their Dual Brushed version. Prior to going brushless I used a lot of Graupner ESCs - made in Korea., never managed to blow one of them either, not even the little micro and pico jobs. Thanks for raising this issue - I like a good debate and we can all learn something from it I hope👍 Plus; piquing my curiosity is always dangerous 😁 Greetings to Down Under from 'Up Over', cheers, 😎Doug PS Further thought just struck me (Ouch😡); if this is really a dramatic problem why have I never seen any warnings about it in any ESC instructions? Yes, I'm THAT guy who actually reads the instructions!!

HMS BRAVE BORDERER by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 23 days ago
Hi Rowen, You don't need capacitors at all, and certainly not in series with the wiring. Whereas I can heartily endorse all that jbkiwi says about the possibilities of modern TXs, I've only scratched the surface of what my Spectrum and Turnigy sets can do, I can see no justification for the extra capacitors on ESC leads. The length of the wires inside a typical model can not have a significant effect on the total resistance. Given a typical resistance of 1m of copper wire with ca 1mm² cross sectional area of 0.02Ω (less for larger gauges) it ain't gonna make a happorth of difference whether you have 4" (10cm) or 40". Maybe a little more warmth but the capacitor can't change that. I also can't see where the spikes he mentions should come from. Also bear in mind that the ESC does not apply pure DC to the motor but a pulse train with a pulse repetition rate of around 8 to 10kHz. That's why the motors whistle and scream. Adding capacitors to this could distort the pulses or reduce their peak value. If the ESC is so bad that it produces big spikes when the pulses are switched on or off (which I doubt theses days) then junk it and buy a decent one. On no account fit a capacitor in series with the wiring, unless it is a special Coaxial Capacitor, which are very big and relatively expensive. See pic. I've only seen them on large electric motors on board ships where the much higher currents and longer cable runs involved than in models may play a role. A very small value capacitor, in the picofarad range might help to short out any potential high frequency RF interference but I've never experienced the need to fit them. In this respect it could be more important that the length of the cable is not close to the wavelengths typically used by RC sets (12.5cm at 2.4GHz) so that it does not act like an antenna. Cheers, Doug 😎 jbkiwi have looked at the link you posted but I'm not convinced considering the small lengths we use in our boats. Yes there will be some overshoot spikes in the pulse train but so severe as to damage anything is in my opinion highly unlikely, given a decent quality ESC in the first place. Something else on that link just occurred to me. There is a pic of what looks like electrolytic (polarised) capacitors between the wires. This is fine for aircraft ESCs which only run forwards, and thus produce positive going pulses. In our boats with reverse the pulse will switch over to negative going. Which after a while could have an explosive effect on the electrolytics. It blows the cans off and produces an interesting snowstorm effect. Good party trick😁 but maybe not so super inside a model boat😡 IF you do fit them to a reversible ESC be sure to use tantalum capacitors which aren't so fussy.

fuse holder by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 23 days ago
Hi Dodgy, The board for Colin's Supermarine yes. After I modified my original version when I discovered excessive heating effects during initial trials. The 'little ones' I made for my Taycol Target no, not quite! Will publish details, with wiring diagrams and test results, in the relevant blogs shortly. Cheers, Doug 😎