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>> Home > Tags > wood boat

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Slowly does it. by fid2b Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 day ago
All getting involved now! I suspect it looks worse in the pictures because the prop thrust will definitely pass over the rudder although perhaps not ideally. And I don't have a cardan shaft, just a uj because as I said, simple appealled for a part time hobby as this is to me. My aim was to see if I could form the wooden hull like my Dad did on the fireboat cos I always admired the shape but of course I would like to finish the job eventually 😀

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by Inkoust Captain   Posted: 2 days ago
Hello, I recommend grinding the whole body with fine sanding paper, then take the "LORD NELSON" pore filler and then re-grind it again. Subsequently, the final lacquer of the best brand. I have been treated like a wooden boat DIVA and already for 6 years on the water without any problems. What happened to you is that you used a bad lacquer that does not resist water. Two-component epoxy lacquers are also good for large yachts. I'm sending a link to the Czech site where the varnishes are designed for ship modellers. Just use the Gogle translator and the same merchandise you can get at the shop. Or on EBay. https://www.modelylodi.cz/Laky-a-plnice-c11_86_2.htm😉

Hydrofoil by Stour-boy Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 6 days ago
Hi shipmates, has anyone ever made a hydrofoil for a model boat, I have got a wooden fire /sea rescue boat single screw which to me seems about right for a hydrofoil system. So where do I start ????? any ideas ? Steve.

3 Footer on a very rare outing by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
Hi Don't know of a film but ... "Dog Boats at War: Royal Navy D Class MTBs and MGBs 1939-1945 By: Leonard C. Reynolds (author) Paperback ISBN13: 9780752450452" Built of plywood and measuring 115 feet long, powered by four supercharged petrol engines and armed to the teeth with heavy weapons, the 'D' Class Motor Gun Boats (MGBs) and Motor Torpedo Boats (MTBs) were better known as Dog Boats and played havoc with enemy shipping in home and foreign waters. During three years of war they engaged the enemy on more than 350 occasions, sinking and damaging many ships. "Dog Boats at War" is the authoritative account of operations by the Royal Navy's 'D' Class MGBs and MTBs in the Second World War in Home, Mediterranean and Norwegian waters. As well as drawing on official records - both British and German - the author has contacted several hundred Dog Boat veterans whose eyewitness accounts add drama to the unfolding story. £17 at Smiths 😉 cheers Doug 😎

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by Westquay Captain   Posted: 14 days ago
Can't really add much to what Doug has said as he's covered the ground pretty well. I don't ever use paint stripper these days. I once used it to remove factory paint from a Matchbox toy when I was making a series of "Code 3" modified steam lorries. Very oddly the paint strippered ones refused to dry when sprayed with cellulose paint (yes, it was available then no probs.) If I sprayed over the factory paint it dried in minutes as cellulose will do. I hadn't had the problem before, but I certainly got it this time and I haven't wanted to use it since. On wood anyway, I wouldn't use anything liquid as it could always soak in and do who knows what damage. I would scrape the finish on your wood , but make sure you have read up on how to sharpen a cabinet scraper. The shiny ones are pigs to sharpen because they are stainless and you cannot get an edge on stainless. The best knives are NT stainless. As an ex clay modeller for the car industry, I can assure you that all slicks, which we called the thin flat scrapers, were spring steel. They had a nice gun blue finish, but would go rusty if you didn't look after them between contracts. Because you really need two hands to properly control a scraper you'll need to find a good way to hold the boat, but a sweet little job like that Sea Hornet will sit twixt your knees. Because you have all those fractures in a vertical way along the grain, keep your scraper in a diagonal way or it will pick up wood grain and damage the model. It may work if you work down the grain, perpendicular to the deck, so you are crossing the fissures in the varnish. I would suggest that if you want a varnish finish you will need to go over the wood with epoxy and possibly a light weight (1oz.) glass cloth. This will stop any tendency to split again. Surprisingly it does allow the grain to show still and after you have flattened the epoxy, you can then apply 2 or 3 coats, rubbed down in between as Doug says with a very fine paper, of a spar varnish. I have a no name tin which I am using on general stuff, from garden items to the spars of my "Vanity" model. When I did a model of a Rive Aquarama Special, I used an International Spar Varnish which has a slightly golden tinge. Now, the hard part. No boat I can ever think of had wood in a vertical lay on the hull. Ecen double or Riva's triple layer was diagonal, finishing with incredibly well selected horizontal layers. The Sea Hornet would be improved no end, I am sure with a layer of horizontal nature. What passes for mahogany these days is horrible stuff (and I would say that on your boat could even be teak, which should never be varnished), so I always used Steamed pear veneer, which has no figure and a very close grain. Sanding sealer, then stain with you idea of mahogany(from an orangey colour to a rich reddy brown), then spar varnish. DO NOT stain the wood/veneer, always stain the first coats of finish. Riva do that too! I want to know what makes you say the mahogany is the only stuff on the hull. The Sea Hornet has 1/16th" ply skins like all Aerokits, so why not yours? Personally, I think it would look best if you painted the hull and spent your efforts on doing a nice laid deck in Pear veneer and caulking. A gloss black hull and a laid, varnished deck look very tasty, like a Greavette gent's Racer. Pic attached. Cheers, Martin https://model-boats.com/media/np/s/200/1494407879

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by John Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
Doug at this rate you will be getting a full time job at the model boats website. The wood is 1.5mm thick; so the hull itself is 1.5mm the wood strips are not laid on anything. I the boat is very light but it feels quite solid; it does not feel fragile. John.

Miss Geico 29" by BOATSHED Commander   Posted: 16 days ago
This is the 29" Brushless Miss Geico. Running on two 14.8 volt 5000mAh LiPo batteries. In Herbert Woods Boatyard in Potter Heigham Norfolk. She is pretty quick but do not know her top speed. Turns flat out on full rudder lock. Runs for about 15 to 20 minutes. Would recommend as a great fun boat.

Finishing by Westquay Captain   Posted: 17 days ago
I didn't realise that! Of course, if you live near Kings Langley you could pop in to see Mark Johnson and he'll actually MAKE the paint for you like he did for our historic wooden canal boat, Heather Bell. But I don't know if he's still trading from there. His company was Tramar Coatings. He advertised in Waterways World. I still have a tin of what he labelled Heather Bell Burgundy. It's on that wee Sea Urchin above. Lots of extra alkyd resins and finer pigments. He's a diamond. He used to call us on a Friday evening when his wife did arty things he had no time for and say, "Put kettle on". Half an hour later he'd turn up at the boatyard with fish and chips for three. We didn't have transport. Happy days. Martin

Using old motors by Westquay Captain   Posted: 20 days ago
Doug, that looks lovely. I can't guarantee the performance would be anything but sedate with the Target, but that kind of boat in the real world would rarely be seen exceeding about 10 knots if that. It's essentially a river boat. I would be inclined to keep with the scheme it has as it's nicely period with the off white. Maybe line the deck with a Rotring a la period too and veneer the coach house sides. I certainly wouldn't strip it as there'll be joints and filler and boring old plywood underneath. No, paint is the Aerokits look for sure Delamination needs only epoxy, either the repair and build stuff or the liquid a la West, SP, etc.. slide a knife in the delamination and convince some epoxy in, then lightly clamp it twixt layers of greaseproof paper (when the GF's out) or plastic bag or similar. I use Plastikard, but I was given a box of lasered off cuts by Ivan at the Vintage Boat Company. He's now sold out to SLEC who are even nearer where I live! Anyway I have plasticard in three thicknesses to waste. If you stroke the surface with a scriber, it will make a weird hollow noise if delaminated. If it is, make a cut, persuade the edges up and insinuate some epoxy into the crack you've made. Ain't nuttn. you can't repair. You should have seen the window frames in my house when I sold it. A festival of epoxy, firewood and P38 car filler. Surveyor passed it with barely a look. Reallygood paint saved the day. Stupid waster! 400 quid Mr. Client, chching! As for the extra gizmos, I'd ditch them to save weight and complexity. You might find a 3 blade prop works better, but I'm no expert there. Finally instead of "this belongs to", I'd simply name her Jessica, in a nice script. I hope that helps. Cheers, Martin

And now it is ESC time by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
I don't know? I'm a bit two left handed when it comes to woodwork! OK for cupboards and fitting out the kitchen etc but not so terrific for miniature stuff. See my comments on 'Using old motors' re the Taycols, I also have one which I plan to refurbish, it has no bearings 🤔, and experiment putting it back into the old Sea Scout that Dad built, only boat he ever finished! Cheers Doug

glass cloth or tissue? by Westquay Captain   Posted: 20 days ago
Took me a while to work out what a GirlFriend minehunter was! I used to have zinc sacrificial anodes on my steel narrowboat. We noticed whe we had our wooden historic boat out that many steel boats were losing their zinc in as little as two years. Yet my old boat had them fitted new when I had it out for a blacking as it had NEVER had any and hadn't suffered at all! Free running, cheap Mabuchis, Cycle battery, Oh those were the days indeed, aber veiieicht so!! My wee Sea Urchin still has it's 58 year old Kako and original shaft and tin prop. I just can't find any flat bell batteries any more! Martin

glass cloth or tissue? by Westquay Captain   Posted: 20 days ago
Thanks, Doug. No, the woodwork really isn't good enough for varnishing and as it's a scale model it has to be painted. Good old British yacht black, with a coppered bottom. I still have a piece of her copper somewhere. It was perfect after 120 odd years! I'll go with the tissue then, thanks for the info. Apparently you can thin epoxy with meths, but I've never found it that thick and I used 25 litres on my full sized canal boat restoration! Supplied free by West as a kind of sponsorship. Hot weather helps, but, as you say it can go off a bit quick if you're not careful with the mix. A guy at the boatyard once mixed way too much to repair his GRP boat and it started to go off in the pot, which then caught fire. A large set of tongs was handy in dunking it in a barrel of water! Cheers, Martin

"Vanity" leaves the building board by Westquay Captain   Posted: 21 days ago
Hi all, I have this afternoon released my model of the Victorian Class C Cutter, "Vanity", from her building board. First surprise was how light it is! I really can't believe how light. Being a plank-on-edge craft she is very deep draughted and with such a light weight she should be able to carry her ballast internally which is much the preferable way for me. Now the really hard stuff begins. Preparing the inside of the hull to take the strains of the various bits of standing rigging, somewhere to fix my patent dual sail winch and get the deck all levelled and cambered correctly. She had a very complex deck, with teak covering boards joggled round the bulwarks, which were simply extensions of her doubled oak frames, then narrow boards (on the model 3/16th") deck panks which follow the covering boards as all good yachts should, but unusually, Vanity did not have a King plank and so there is no joggling of the inner ends of the planks, but they must, of course, all meet perfectly. The deck furniture was also rather splendid as she had a roundhouse aft, glazed and several companionways and deck lights, plus the usual Samson post and bitts. Her tiller was a huge lump of mahogany about 6 feet long. The level of woodwork throughout was like this:-https://model-boats.com/media/np/s/200/1493829043 That's how she looked when I lived aboard her in Burnham-on-Crouch She was like this when sailing https://model-boats.com/media/np/s/200/1493829032 Cheers, Martin

Waterproof glue by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Hi Chris. Like yours, my very first wooden boat was held together with Cascamite. I'm very happy to recommend Titebond 2, it's an aliphatic resin that's waterproof, dries very quickly and forms a very strong bond on wood to wood joints. I have used it extensively in the construction of my crash tender project. The other glue I have used is Z-poxy 30 minute epoxy resin, great for wood to metal and various other materials. I hope that is helpful. Rob.

Battery problems by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 28 days ago
My knowledge of "elecy" stuff is pretty limited, but I see that the model boat world (excluding racing types) is in the dark ages compared to planes, helis, cars etc when it comes to motors, batteries etc We have to reply a lot on testing, fiddling etc when it comes to gettingn a fast electric set up, in a scale heavy old wood boat😁 as there isnt much info out there. I tried testing over a long time, with one boat inparticular, and was lucky enough to have te use of eagle tree data logging, so could measure watts, amps, gps speed, voltage drop and so on, and analyse the resultsd on graphs etc back home on the pc. Its amazing to see that sometime s the fastest set up isnt always the best when you compare run time, amp draw, heat, voltage draw etc, and what "looks fast" sometimes isnt as fast as you thought😊 This boat for example, 6kg, ply construction will do 25mph, after that torque roll is kicking in, and it want to roll over. I tested props over a long time, using cheap plastic "X" props, and with the results was then able to get a more efficient and visually pleasing brass cleaver 3 blade one. Ranging from 50mm to 55mm the amp draw went from 45a to 90a using same batteries!, and teh highest amp draw prop didnt produce the fastest speed, all interesting stuff. The boat is similar to the OP perkassa. I also went from direct drive, to a geared drive, and can change the characteristics of the boat using different cheap gears, eg., small lake, dont need top speed, so change to acceleration, big lake, lets give up acceleration and have top speed, and so on👍