Cookies used in this website are gluten free, wheat free and dairy free. By using this website you agree to our use of cookies. More Info
Guest
Login Below
Join Us On Social Media!
   
Get The Model Boats App!
Apple App Store
Android app on Google Play


Help Support This Website
£
or enter custom amount

(Non Contributor)

Help support this free
website and donate.



£285 a year is needed to keep the website and apps online. Please consider donating £5 or more to help towards these fees.
All donations are securely managed through PayPal. Amounts donated are not published online.

Many thanks for your kind support.

Model Boats Website Team


Donation History
July 2017: 14 people
June 2017: 8 people
May 2017: 8 people
April 2017: 23 people
March 2017: 9 people
February 2017: 12 people
January 2017: 26 people


Unique Visitors This Month

Website Members

Terms and Conditions
Privacy Policy
Advertising
Contact


Model Boats Website
Active Users (20)
Login or Register
To Remove This Ad

Login or Register
To Remove This Ad
>> Home > Tags > wood

wood
wood
Warning by octman Commander   Posted: 2 days ago
That reminds me of when I was having a woodwork lesson at school(a very long time ago) when I went to pick up a plane that had been put down on it's side. My thumb went up the blade! Now that was bloody! Obviously this leopard has not changed his spots even after 60 years! Any one got a 16th century suit of armour going cheap? Chris

Warning by Black Dog Jack Apprentice   Posted: 3 days ago
My Dad was a "real" woodworker, you know, with chisels and mallets and spokeshaves, and stuff. He always insisted that you should never try to catch things falling of the bench in case it was a chisel or a Stanley knife. I never had the opportunity to stab myself in the foot though, but I did trip over the odd cabinet trying to get out of the way.

Sophia by Alan999 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 4 days ago
The Sophia is a Chris Craft Riva that I am building from scratch using scrap plywood.

Dolphin 16 (19) by AllenA Commander   Posted: 4 days ago
[Score: 7/10] 19"/1100g Dolphin 16 (19) Capable of 10mph and a runtime of 20mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 30mm) Direct Drive to a Graupner Speed 600 8.4v (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (7.2v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Chinese 320amp (10Amps) ESC - Comments: This is the Meccano Magazine January 1967 issue plan, built in balsa. I didn't do a build blog as the construction is well covered on the net. Started with an A4 plan and used Excel to enlarge it onto 9 A4 sheets. I chose something simple as I haven't built a boat for thirty years. Really enjoyed the build and re-learning how to overcome the problems that always arise. She is oversized being 19" long and having a 7.5" beam. She sits nicely on the water and begins to plane. Will upgrade the the battery sometime. The decking is worktop edge strip pre-glued but in future will use the unglued strips. The cabin was adapted to extend over the whole boat as there was little space for modern electrics. I will add in and out air vents as the motor will need to breathe. Also, the true model should have an upper deck and windscreen and this will be easy to add sometime in the future. Really surprised and pleased with results from aliphatic wood glue. The finish, which I am not completely happy with, due mostly to my own impatience, was achieved with Ronseal multi purpose wood filler, lightweight fibreglass laminate with Eze-Kote. Paint is Acrylics and Marine varnish. The electrics are: Acoms AR 201 Reciever, Servo Acoms AS 12, Cheap Chinese ,supposedly, 320 amp ESC and 7.2v Nimh battery pack. The Graupner Speed 600 8.4v, bought it cheaply some months ago, was already in one of my boxes and you can see the adaptation required to fit it into the boat. All the Acoms controls I picked up at a boot sale including an Acoms Techniplus Alpha Transmitter on 27mhz. Inside I used Hammerite Smooth Gold as I couldn't buy silver. Modern Hammerite is thin and squeamish and took 3 coats to provide reasonable coverage. One final rant I do like the new silicon wires but they are a nightmare to solder to a motor. I think I will use soldered connectors in future. So there we are, first model in 30 years and now so many models to build and so little time. Lessons learned...... don't be impatient.

Secure the hatches and raise the flags ! by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
Hi Colin. Welcome to the forum and congratulations on your good choice of model 👍. I bought all of the brass pins I used from a UK based eBay seller http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/SOLID-BRASS-PANEL-PINS-15mm-20mm-2... I can't imagine that something similar would not be available in Oz, try a good joinery or cabinet makers supply outlet. I mostly used the 15mm size and used, quite surprisingly, a total of around 500 😱. These pins have a tapered head rather than a flat one so that they can be punched flush, or just below the surface of the wood very easily. This is important when pinning the side and bottom skins so that the pin hole can be filled and sanded to give a very smooth surface for finishing. Also, when pinning the thin wood strips always pre-drill the wood to stop the wood from splitting. I'm not sure if CMB supply this type but Javro, who replied earlier, may be able to confirm this. Good luck with the build and please do think about posting a build blog on this site and ask as many questions as you need to. As I discovered, the help and advice you will get will be invaluable. Rob.

Denatured Alcohol by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
Hi Chris Always happy to share my experiences. Epoxy is basically a glue and whilst the aero boys like to use it with glass cloth to cover their wings because it bonds well to the wood and remains slightly flexible, my experience is it is dear, adds significantly to the weight, is difficult to apply evenly and has a nasty habit of running after application. We used on the large liners, having also seen the hype on U-Tube, and really struggled with the application. If I was using this as a sealing coat with or without cloth then I prefer Polyester lay up resin which is cheaper, thin and easy to apply, has controllable setting time and produces a much harder finish. Good luck with the registration, not sure I would want to get that close to HM Customs & Excise! Happy building Dave

Patricia by saga32 Petty Officer   Posted: 7 days ago
[Score: 8/10] 33" Patricia Capable of 8mph and a runtime of 40mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 50mm) Direct Drive to a KedaTR2837/18 KV830 (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (7.2v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through EZRUN 18A (10Amps) ESC - Comments: 1950,s. Scratch built. Hull based roughly on a Cris-Craft speed boat which lived in the field beside Jimmy Laird's house. Wooden built mostly 1/16 Obechi. First motor, geared Taycol with horseshoe magnet. Homebullt 27MHz galloping ghost steering only

Sophia by Alan999 Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 9 days ago
Chris Craft Riva Building a Chris craft Riva from scratch seemed a good idea.. I use three ply scrap wood costing three euros fifty cents so far.But I have in stock rolls of two inch wide veneer which I wrap around the stringers. So far it's three thicknesses thick which I feel is enough. Next stage is a hard sanding then a varnish before the 100 and things to do to it. Any comments appreciated and ideas. Alan

Skimmer from Mobile Marine by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
Hi Chris Mine just has a large flat ply plate over the bottom of the hull with the rx rudder servo and battery fixed in place. I use velcro for the rx and made mounting blocks for the servo. An aircraft snake connects to the rudder. The battery is in a small wooden compartment. My ESC is just below the motor mount hanging loose. You do need to strengthen the motor mount - I used lots of wood inside to make it all less pliable - the plastic is not strong enough on its own. You need to build a plinth to attach the motor high enough to attach your prop. This need to be well braced to take the thrust from the prop. Mine moves slightly and if I were to make another I would make it stronger. Mine required two small sheets of lead up front to keep it on the water at speed. Please post details of your build Dave

Experimemtal by tysonyoung Petty Officer   Posted: 13 days ago
[Score: 5/10] 72" Experimemtal Capable of 11mph and a runtime of 120mins Powered by Lead Acid (12v) 7Amp/h Batteries - Comments: Ebay Purchase. Originally a test tank model. Pumped water ballast no rudder or keel. Now fitted with lead fin ballast plus 2 7ah gel cells. and auxiliary motor. Sailing rig "A" class . 72in long 32 in beam .Hull strip wood deck fibre board. Sail winch and heavy duty rudder servo fitted. Design guess work !! Note picture of setting up rudder. 3 years work.

Secure the hatches and raise the flags ! by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 15 days ago
Having spent so much time adding fittings and detail to the removable cabin roofs and hatches the last thing I want is for them to be dislodged and see them sink without trace 😱! Having used some amazingly strong neodymium magnets to hold the foam tanks securely in the rear well I was confident that they would be more than powerful enough to hold the various roofs and hatches in place so I scoured eBay for some suitable sizes and shapes. I settled on two sizes, 25x6x3mm and 12x6x3mm and ordered 10 of each, more than I need but so useful to have in the bits box. A word of caution with these magnets, always slide them apart and avoid letting them crash together as the impact can easily break them into pieces, as I discovered. Thankfully I have some spares ! For the engine roof magnets I made a couple of small plywood brackets into which the larger magnets are fixed with epoxy and these were in turn epoxied onto the inside faces of the engine room walls. The mating magnets were let into the underside of the roof frame and firmly glued in place after double checking the mating polarity and orientation. An identical method was used for the forward cabin roof but using the smaller magnets. For the removable panel in the centre section over the motor I used a single pair of small magnets on the rear edge only as the front of this panel is held under the cabin door in a rebated part of the floor that forms the threshold of the door. I had to fit a small brass handle in the rear of this panel so that I could pull the panel up and away as there is no other means of doing so without, I made a ‘hook tool’ from some brass wire for this purpose. The floor panel in the rear cockpit is secured on it’s rear edge by a pair of the larger magnets, the forward edge being held down by the towing hook bracing stays. The removable hatch in the rear cockpit floor was also fitted with two pairs of the smaller magnets let into the underside of the hatch and the hatch framing of the floor. One of the brass handles that I that had previously set into the hatch was bent up slightly so that I could use my brass ‘hook tool’ to release it from the magnets hold. So now all the roofs and hatches are firmly secured by the concealed magnets and are easily removable without any fiddly catches or fixings and now there’s now very little chance of them coming adrift and disappearing! The final finishing detail are the two RAF ensigns, one on the mast and one on the stern flagstaff. The ensigns were made by Mike Allsop Scale Flags & Ensigns who was very helpful and advised me on the most suitable sizes for the 1:12 scale of my boat. His flags are extremely well made, excellent value for money and look very realistic when flying and fluttering !! Mike can be contacted at: scaleflags@outlook.com or by telephone on 01476 573331 They are hand made from a fine and flexible silk cloth that behaves like a real flag even in a slight breeze and are easy to fix with diluted PVA glue. The smaller flag was fitted to the lanyard on the mast as described in the supplied instruction sheet. The ensign on the stern flagstaff was very carefully formed and glued so that the flag was not fixed in one place and could rotate around the shaft of the flagstaff as this piece screws into a brass fitting on the rear deck and this will ensure that it will always find it’s own position. A small brass ring was formed and glued to the flagstaff below the ensign so it would always stay at the top and not slip down. So, all hatches battened down, flags raised and ready for action. That’s just about everything finished now barring any trimming and ballasting required and is ready for it’s maiden voyage. I hope that all of you that have been following my blog have had as much enjoyment reading about my build as I have had in the building and finishing process 😁 And a big thank you to all that have contributed so much with encouraging comments, suggestions and advice 👏 😍

Sea Queen refurbishment by onetenor Commander   Posted: 16 days ago
Even after Trike not all of the oil may be removed from the wood and could show up later . Trike works really well on metals and fabrics but is hit and miss on wood. Good luck all the same. John

Sea Queen refurbishment by colinhubbard Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 17 days ago
Hi guys, thanks for suggestions, have managed to get some trichloroethane, degreeser have tried it on an old hull that was oil soaked and it left the wood clean and dry, but beware as it is highly dangerous to inhale the fumes. So hopefully will try on the old Queen at the weekend. Will let you know how it goes. Thanks for the interest Colin.

Sea Queen refurbishment by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 17 days ago
Hi Mark, Hmm! The bags you mean are desiccants, so called because they absorb water! Not oil 🤔 Concrete / cement dust may work (reasonably) well on roads after accidents / oil, diesel spillages but I doubt it will be effective enough to suck oil out of the wood. Dave is right, the only sure way is surgery. Bon chance, Doug 😎

Sea Queen refurbishment by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 17 days ago
Hi Colin If the wood is impregnated with castor and ether you have no option other than to cutout all the affected panels back to the formers and fit replacements. You will need to add stringers to the formers so you can glue the new panels in place. Gorilla white wood glue will work well or epoxy. You can not paint over an oily surface. If you are lucky it will just be the engine bay that is affected. Please keep us posted on your progress Kind Regards Dave