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>> Home > Tags > wooden

wooden
wooden boat
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wooden
Club Racer, One class by ronrees Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 3 days ago
[Score: 10/10] 18"/500g Club Racer, One class Capable of 15mph and a runtime of 30mins Single Propellor (2 Blade X Type 30mm) Direct Drive to a 2820 x 1100kv (2 Blade X Type) Powered by LiPoly (7.4v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through Turnigy w/p. 30 amp (5Amps) ESC - Comments: This is based on a Fairey Swordsman and is another of my own designs but made in Vac Formed Styrene for which the vac former was home-made as well. The model is designed specifically for youngsters and club members who want to race together. The boat only has 5 parts!! Top, bottom, rudder and servo cast assembly ( Polyester resin) and motor, prop shaft assembly also Polyester resin. A wooden frame that forms the seal and holds hull in shape. The whole top comes off. Its scarey fast and very tough (2mm styrene) and was made for under £25. Hoping build article will also go into MB magazine sometime.

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 days ago
Before the funnel could be installed wanted to fit a working radar scanner, navigation lights and the batteries. Decided to use sub C NIMH batteries in plastic holders, they should have the target endurance and provide some ballast. Fitted two sets of 4 cells, one at the forward end of the superstructure and the other at the rear, both at keel level. These were inserted into wooden battery trays to hold them in place. A dry test run showed a full speed motor run time well exceeding the hour target, so will try on water. Also took the opportunity to fit the Rx and then adjust the rudder before finishing off the wiring. Both the navigation lights (LEDs) and the radar scanner work. The radar is driven by a servo with the potentiometer removed and a magnetic drive shaft run up through the superstructure from below the deck. The motor requires about 9 volts to run at what would seem to be something approximating to scale speed; fitted a voltage reducer to allow the lights and the radar to work on less than 6 volts. The mast lights are to be installed in a separate circuit after the masts are added. As I get more into the detail it is evident the GA drawing and the photographs of the vessel in service differ. Fortunately the component locations seem consistent, although the equipment is not. This most apparent in the hold ventilators. The GA shows the standard cowl vents, but the photographs show a mixture between an vertically squeezed oval vent (which am advised is more typically German) and ventilator columns with cylindrical caps. The column style vents with cylindrical caps were easily made from two different sizes of styrene tube with the cap tops made from styrene offcuts. The squeezed oval style vents were more difficult. Broke them down into the major parts of the cylindrical vertical tube and, from a larger tube cut a small ring and filed one end to straddle the tube once it had been squeezed oval. Glued it into place whilst restrained in a small hand vice. Once set, removed and sanded the the two to give a smooth transition, closing the rear aperture off with styrene offcuts. Then resorted to wood filler, filed down to give a smooth, oval vent.

Spraying/hand painting by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
The Upol Barcote product recommended is intended for Industrial use mainly in car restoration. The spec sheet can be seen at http://www.u-pol.com/files/6689/up0720-SDS-EN. If you are intending to use this Full PPE equipment should be worn and only use in a well ventilated area. Personally I use paintstrippers, scapers and a hot air paint stripper to clean wooden hulls back to bare wood. This allows me to see any damage caused by fuels used with IC engines. I agree its messy, takes time and is best done outside, but you do end up with a solid hull with no hidden soft spots. I agree with Jarvo's use of Clear Cote either in gloss or semi matt finish. If the air temp is much below 20 deg most rattle cans will not give a good finish and runs will be difficult to avoid.

TRIUMPH (CG-52301) USCG Type F MLB by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 days ago
Laser cut kit from Barracuda RC Boats, N Carolina, USA. Baltic birch plywood false keel, ribs/frames, hull sheathing, deck and cabins. No formal plans; I was able to source a handful of B&W archival photos from the USCG website. Fortunately I was able to procure a motherload of archival photos and a few hard to read layout drawings from Mr. Timothy Dring, LCDR, USN (Ret.). He is co-author of "American Coastal Rescue Craft", which is the "bible" if you will, of such. I do sometimes thank the internet. I am certain that without his assistance, my efforts on this wouldn't have been as enjoyable. The kit was also void of fittings, which I was aware of prior to purchase, so I invested in a 3D printer. That I've used to a limited degree, due to searching for parts in the correct file format is mind-numbing! I have globally sourced fittings; USA, UK, ASIA. As a matter of fact, the searchlights I got from this Model Boat Shop were 3D printed, and I was able to fit 5mm LEDs into them. I'd like to get a couple more and put some superbright 12v LED drone lamps in them for use on my 35" towboat. Many deck fittings are handmade when possible, the cleats and fairleads are from Cornwall Boats, UK. (Very reasonable & diverse source, if you didn't already know.) I try to keep wood natural when detail allows it, as I never have enjoyed painting over natural grain. Her decks are covered with 1/16" scribed basswood sheathing from earthandtree.com, which is normally used for wainscoting dollhouse walls. All my boats that have wood decks are covered with scribed sheathing; I feel it makes 'em look "sexy". Believe it or not, the idea for wainscoting came from finding 3/16" at Hobby Lobby's dollhouse department. A couple of feet x 3.5" was about $16, so I found a less expensive source that also had more selections (earthandtree.com) The rail stanchions are 3/16" square dowels with 2 corners rounded over on the Dremel router table. Leaving their base square, I fit a square peg into a round hole with no glue to facilitate removal, and also for ease of replacing broken ones, which is inevitable. The rail is 1/16" brass rod that also is readily removable. The stern rail is stationary on the lower half, and the chain & wire stanchions are removable for towing ops. The deck coamings and knuckle are African mahogany strips, other mahogany accents came from leftovers of a prior build. I also try on all my boats, to incorporate vintage leftover scribed sheathing salvaged from my late Father's builds, so I know he's got a part in my builds. Note-the raised deck section between the aft ladder trunk and towing bit is actually a laminated deckhouse he made for the Frigate Essex. Unfortunately, he was unable to build that kit due to Alzheimer's disease in his latter years. (I blame that mostly on the hazardous fumes from the airplane "dope" & glue he used when building RC planes in the 60s & 70s.) I use polyurethane instead of resin due to COPD, 37 yrs of smoking, I quit 2.5 yrs ago. The driveline consists of: 775 Johnson DC main (3500 RPM@12V), Harbor Models 4mm x 14" shaft w/brass stuffing box, Raboesch 75mm 5-blade brass wheel (not OEM), 5mm U-joint couplers, Dimart 320A fan-cooled ESC. Handmade wooden teardrop rudder on a 3/8" sternpost, 1/4" tiller arm steered by a Halcion sail winch servo and cable system. Flysky 6 channel. The nav lights and other illumination are Lighthouse 9v LEDs, also a GoolRC Receiver controlled flashing blue Law Enforcement light. Obviously, I put the cart before the horse and completed the topsides and below deck before finishing the outer hull, but the Wx and season change dictated such. Can't wait for Spring!

MV TEAKWOOD by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
Have moved on to the deck furniture and equipment, including the funnel. Most of it can be made from the usual assortment of scrap materials and odd and ends. Decided to start on the funnel. Planned to make up a wooden replica and wrap a thin styrene sheet around it, finally inserting styrene formers into the shell, gluing them into place. Made the replica up from scrap wood blocks and shaped it into the correct shape. The outcome looked so good was tempted to use as final as making funnels seems quite a challenge. Anyway proceeded to plan and shape thin styrene sheet around the replica, using a heat gun to overcome the memory. Once this was done, fitted shaped styrene internal formers to hold the styrene to the correct shape and glued with adhesive. After the styrene glue had dried and the excess material trimmed, now had two usable funnels - wood and styrene. The wood version is nominally smaller and fits slightly better, so decided to use it. The Teakwood was originally operated by the J I Jacobs Company, which had a buff funnel with a black cap as markings. Stumbled across a picture of the vessel when she was chartered to the British India Steam Navigation Co. Evidently BI usually painted chartered vessels in their livery. Although the picture does not show the traditional and attractive BISNCo white hull cheat line, it does show the funnel markings. These are black with two narrowly separated white bands. Rather preferred this scheme so adopted it. The picture was taken in the mid 1960s and it also shows a pristine looking ship, my worries about the model looking unsoiled seem groundless. One of the pictures shows a strip that extends back from the wheelhouse almost to the funnel - this is a support for the awnings that fit over the bridge wings.

motors by pilot Petty Officer   Posted: 28 days ago
hi last ditch effort before i take up knitting recap presedent huntsman 46 inch wooden kit hobbyking turnigy aquastar 408 4-1050kv water cooled brushless 160a water cooled esc thank you all for your help steve

my life boats by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 29 days ago
BRAVO ZULU! I LOVE DOUBLE-ENDERS. THIS IS MY USCG 52' TYPE F WOODEN MOTOR LIFEBOAT (POSTED) BEAUTIFUL WORK, SIR.

Glues and Hull protection by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 29 days ago
Cascamite. sometimes difficult to buy but definitely still a high quality glue, not so good on plastic / wood joints but wood alone it is superb. Modern glues will always have a place in the tool box, (horses for courses) Protecting your hull, wooden hulls coat inside and out with a runny resin then add glass cloth to the outer hull, I use .7oz cloth or a stocking, depends on the hull size, Mark

motors by pilot Petty Officer   Posted: 1 month ago
hi i have a wooden huntsman 46 ready for motor my last post gave me some ideas i am looking at hobbyking turnigy xk3674 1900kv part number 9393000021-0 and turnigy marine 120a bec waterproof speed controller part number 9020000033-0 what do we think steve

my first attempt by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
BRAVO ZULU! WELL DONE. The USCG 44' Motor Lifeboat was my first RC endeavor as well, in 1989. My latest is a Barracuda RC Boats 1:12 USCG 52' Type F Wooden Motor Lifeboat. Can't wait for 2018 navigation season! HAVE A SAFE RC BOATING DAY FAIR WINDS & FOLLOWING SEAS GOD BLESS AMERICA!

Constellation by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
BRAVO ZULU! Very fine replica sir. As small boy, I invested many hours in the basement on Dad's workbench to construct the Revell plastic kit of USS CONSTITUTION. I remember the detail of that model and subsequent plastic & wooden builds, so I can fathom the painstaking effort it involved to create this work of art. Thank you. FAIR WINDS & FOLLOWING SEAS

Serenity by Bryan-the-pirate Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
[Score: 8/10] 30" Serenity Capable of 6mph and a runtime of 120mins Direct Drive to a Mother nature Controlled Through Futaba 27Mhz ESC - Comments: A wooden yacht that I am told is based on a fiesta (but presumably not the ford version) A fast and responsive sail and enjoyable. It had sticky back plastic deck accesses but I disliked them and made up balsa hatch covers instead, varnished in clear varnish they are more pleasing to my eye despite the lessening of water protection. can anyone recognise the design?

Thames sailing barge Capricorn by tomarack Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
I tried attaching to the roof of the cabin MD80 camera with a clip. In practice, the camera was unreliable. That's why I bought a small and reliable sports camera that I placed in front of mizzenmast.The camera has a scanning angle of 120 °.Looks OK. (Tested) The camera can be easily attached by sliding it to the mount (wooden cube)on the roof of the aft cabin.

Plating by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Soldering almost finished. I have used two different melting point solders, I found that very useful. Tip don't keep you legs under the solder point, OW! The foam mould removed along with the wooden frame. Will be replacing the frame around the deck level, and the two bulkheads each side of the engine room. Bulkheads will be recut 15mm deeper, to allow for the extra depth to accommodate the different boiler. This will be cut to the mark, the stick is on the shaft line. keeping the shorter section. Need to clean up the outside and stop the leaks, Yes there are a few, but then to few to mention.

Skimmer from Mobile Marine by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Steve Sorry, no I did not take photos of the build. If you have the Mobile Marine hull then I built a vertical wooden plate up through the top and strengthened with wood plates beneath the top moulding. If your rudder snake runs over the top make sure you allow for this when deciding how high to mount the motor/prop!! This works but flexes when power is applied so if I did another I would mount the upright to the base and make a slot in the top to allow it to pass through. I would also provide support, below the top, to the upright behind and right up to the hull sides. The force from the motor is truly awesome and plastic mouldings tend to (and do) flex. I use two rudders as other members have found they work better than one. I used 1/8" welding rods for the cage and did have some hard black netting at one time but have had no problems with just the frame. If I sailed in an area where the public had access then I would provide a cover. Just get the mount and prop sorted before you finalise as mine was too small!