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>> Home > Tags > wooden

wooden
wooden boat
wooden model
wooden
Stern & keel formers by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 16 hours ago
I have found as you have that gluing your abrasive paper to a wooden block is far better than wrapping and making sure all the bulkheads and other skin supports are at the correct angle can make a real difference to the line of the hull, only noticeable when looking down the length of the hull when painted and that's too late to change things. I also make a number of different shaped sanding blocks/sticks down to using the coffee sticks with abrasives stuck to then for getting into difficult areas.

Pretend deck planking by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
Hi Steve, What went wrong? 😲 1. Drawing on deck planking, i.e. on a veneer or thin ply- Why/how did it go wrong? Surely since the planks are all 'parallel curves' all you need to do is make a curve template in plasticard from the plan. Then at a few strategic points along the plank length mark the widths of the planks. Set the template along these points and 'Bob's yer Uncle - Fanny's yer Aunt' 😉 Mind you; doing it that way the 'curious grain of the planks' would betray the fiddle🤔 2. 'what type of strip wood - Any very close grained type. Possible source- http://www.slecuk.com/index.html 3. How to glue it!? Any thin, spreadable waterproof wood glue! 4. Gap? Max 0.5mm perhaps. Ca 10 to 1 ratio. 5. 'How do you secure the bent planks whilst the glue dries? Modelling pins at strategic points along the plank. Assumes planks are pre-shaped by steaming!! See 6. 😉 6. 'Do I need to steam the planks? - YES! As mentioned above; make a template defining the curve required. From this make a jig of ca 5mm x 10mm in which you can set the steamed planks to cool and set to the shape required. To allow for the so called 'spring back' make the jig with a slightly sharper curve than the actual deck curve. When fitting the planks to the deck it's easier to 'push them out' than to try to increase the curvature. Finally; mark on the deck base the plank widths at strategic points along the plank length as alignment points. Glue planks alternately left/right (OK port/starboard😉) using modelling pins to hold in place until the glue is fully cured. For the 'gaps' There are various solutions in Build Blogs on this site. One that I like is the use of thin black card. When the whole deck is planked and properly cured sand lightly (ca 240 grit). 7. 'weathered teak' there are various suppliers of teak stain and also deck weathering stains; e.g. Jotika stain, Lifecolor Washes for Hulls and Wooden Decks, set part no. LP04, which includes Wooden deck darkener and Shadower, amongst other useful weathering pigments. http://www.astromodel.it Google Lifecolor and you'll surely find some UK distributors. Enough answers for enough questions!? 😁 Hope this provides some inspiration, Cheers, Doug 😎

steam water pump by GaryLCoupland Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 10 days ago
You don't need to buy a water tank, simply build one into your hull using plywood and fibre-glass, the favourite is the sharp end simply fit a wooden bulk-head and cover it in fibre-glass.

AZIZ KIT by jacko Commander   Posted: 16 days ago
hi anything like this as this is sitting in my workshop waiting refurb but mine is 17 inch long and all wooden hull

New knee, outdoor trials begin. by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 17 days ago
Hey Colin, I've got a staple remover 😉 you could nip over here, I'll whip the staples out and you can take the Supermarine back with you! 😁😁 Seriously though folks🤓; Great news Colin, esp. after all this time and pain 👍 Very happy for you 😊 Wasn't kidding about the motor. I'll be updating the 'Resurrection' blog soon. Attached are a few preview pics of the final tests run at the weekend. She's chuntering along at 11.1V (equivalent to a 3S LiPo) drawing about 1.3A off load. I've made up a set of connecting leads and set it up to run ahead with an RH prop as requested. I've assumed your ESC will have bullet connectors!? FF I've added a Red/Green LED to indicate if it should be running forwards (clockwise) or backwards. BTW: I wouldn't recommend full astern on any more than 7.4/8.6V, she don't like it 😱 Shall I put it in that natty plastic box? Or will you just screw it to a wooden frame? All the best to you both, Cheers, Doug 😎

Scratch built yacht. by ChrisG Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 18 days ago
I am thinking of building a new sailing yacht from plans which I have yet to acquire. I have 8 A4 pages of drawings of a Goth-USOM from Frank Russell 2014, not sure where I got them from and if they are worthy of the time and effort. The size is about right at 1000mm length and about 1500mm deck to masthead. I have had dealings with Nylet in the past and am sure they would be helpful for rigging, sails etc. I plan to plank build the hull onto wooden bulkheads. Although I have built several model boat hulls using this method before I wonder if I could enlist some help or recommendations from any other members of this group ie choice of plans, how to do it books. Many thanks Chris G

Ferdinand Keulen by Toby Lieutenant   Posted: 19 days ago
[Score: 5/10] Twin Propellors (4 Blade 40mm) Direct Drive - Comments: Fibre glass hull. Wooden and plastic superstructure. Built issuing the hull and plan.

My other hobby by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
Just recalled one of my weirder experiences on a commercial flight! Was also on the memorable trip to Uganda end of the 80ies, just after Idi Amin had left the stage! Was on a hop from Nairobi to Kampala (Entebbe). Aircraft was a venerable Boeing 727of Kenya Airways. Had a funny feeling climbing aboard as I saw the oil streaks over the wings and underside of the fuselage. The smell inside and state of the floor was more like a public toilet than a commercial aircraft.😡 After taking my window seat I was joined by a large 'native' Momma, who took up the remaining two seats in the row, and then I realised why the floor was as it was.😲 She plumped herself down with a big grin all round and carefully settled a large wooden crate with slats on her expansive lap! The crate was full of LIVE CHICKENS!!!!!!!!!!!! At first my ghast was absolutely flabbered😲 I expected that next someone would start building a fire to roast one, but it turned out to be quite funny and even useful! When the 'In flight meal' arrived it looked to me like old British Rail sandwiches (banana shaped) that they had sold on around 1960! I spent the rest of the flight feeding them to the chickens to the delight of 'Momma' and others around us, not to mention the chickens 😁 If you fly around long enough, and to off beat places, all sorts of odd things can happen! 😉 Priceless memories 😊 Cheers all, Doug 😎

Ship rudders by Toby Lieutenant   Posted: 21 days ago
Two wooden pieces, steel rod, each hinge 3mm i/d brass tube, shaped with filler and then each hinge covered and the shape made using Strips of five glass and epoxy finishing resin. File to suit. Pins for hinges clevis type 3mm.

Carina by Hellmut1956 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 21 days ago
This time I want to show the process after removing the now sanded hull. You get a first view of having me removing the frames and starting to fill lead into the wooden hull. In the last photo, you can appreciate the benefits of removing all frames from within the hull. The surface inside the hull is ready for further processing.

Taking shape! by GrahamP74 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
Managed to fit the gantry and mast and made the sail. To get the right cloth I used and old pillowcase (well I think it was old) and painted it both sides with wood stain / varnish. Happy with the finish. As with all my models I always put a piece that my Dad made on the boat, this time it is the wooden pulley block.

Brixham trawler IBEX by cenbeth Admiral   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Samnewbie I have a Cariad which is wooden hulled at twice scale. I decided to use a false keel but as I bought the hull completed needed to retro-fit one. I agree with you! If you can fit the tube as early on as possible it will make life a bit easier. My keel needs to be about 12kg and the tube is a couple of inches behind the mast. I am still trying to cast the keel; I'm now on my fourth attempt! I have calculated the keel weight and plan on it being about 1kg lighter than need be. This will allow me to finely trim the boat up once complete. Good luck with yours. Edward

Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc.... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Useful to know about Vanish. It certainly worked on my Star yacht sails. Fortunately the sails on the Ailsa yacht are lovely anyway, just some new rigging cord required. I would say the sails were the same as bed sheets. I used some white spirit to clean the deck on the Ailsa. Most of the dirt being handling muck. Then I waxed it with 3M wax...twice. It's wonderful stuff which I bought for our historic narrowboat's new paintwork. It was a wooden boat and when I replaced the cabins and had painted them with Tra-mar Coatings hand made enamel paint, I waxed them with 3M's wax and they went another 3 winters before I sold the boat, with the rain still rolling off in beads. The Ailsa is now waiting for some spar varnish over the repair's creamish paint. I couldn't match it perfectly, but I didn't want to repaint the whole hull. All the repairs are under the waterline so it shouldn't show. The Star...I never heard of them using aluminium for masts. How would they have kept the rigging eyes in place? Martin

Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc.... by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
I think Hydrogen Peroxide is the active ingredient in Vanish and the like. It is regarded as "The Safe Bleach" in the cleaning products industry. It remains active on cleaned surfaces for up to 72 hrs.Hypochlorite types only for as long as you can smell them. It is safe to use on just about any surface or fabric and mixed with a small amount of say washing up liquid it will clean body fats from baths and showers and other fats from cookers and work surfaces. Also removes mould etc. It produces no toxic fumes and is safe on the skin. I worked for a company called Environmental Chemicals who were devoted to safer cleansing alternatives. You would be amazed at it's effect on a previously washed bread board. I won't list all they made but the one with the HP in it was very popular with industry and the public. I could identify most of their chemicals used by smell and Hydrogen Peroxide was one. Well not so much a smell but it's action on my nasal passages. Likewise with gas fire and boiler fumes. A very handy thing to have when I was plumbing/gas fitting. Anyway back to the point. You can bleach your sails safely with it as often as you like to make them as white (or_ grey) as you like. It also shifts grime from painted/varnished wood and metals. A mention was made by someone (Westie ?)of metal masts etc on a star Yacht. I thought all Star yachts had all wooden masts and spars. I knew the Denyes.Jean-Jacques in particular and was allowed into the hallowed halls once or twice but didn't see everything. I was told that after the war wood was in short supply and old mangle rollers that were made with apple wood were sought and used . I am waiting to get back on my feet to restore the two yachts I was given for my two boys at that time.Around '67/68. Only the smaller unnamed ones. I don't know what no they are. I've already made a mast for one but all metal fittings will need cutting out afresh and new suits of sails acquired. Regarding sails. Handkerchiefs are too fine a material to allow recovery in a blow down. They don't allow the water out so keep the yacht flat. Anyone know of an alternative solution? Sorry to go on but I hope this diatribe has been helpful to someone.👍

Ashes the scratch built Motor Torpedo Boat by Sakibian Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
I found this hull at thingiverse last year. I printed the hull from a local shop and rest was handmade. Firstly I bought a 2426 4200kv brushless 2-3s which was too powerful and too heavy for the boat size. The length is 38cm. And the 30Amp esc was also too big for it's size. After that I tried small 180 brushed motor with 20A brushed esc w/brake. It was perfect (still it's heavy😂). The bridge and deck is made by 1.75mm pvc,torpedos are made of wooden pencil. Small battery space takes a 2s 500mah lipo. 30mm 3blade propeller. YouTube video link is here: https://youtu.be/KZdmZ8_Z0IE