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>> Home > Tags > wooden

wooden
wooden boat
wooden model
wooden
Patricia by saga32 Petty Officer   Posted: 7 days ago
[Score: 8/10] 33" Patricia Capable of 8mph and a runtime of 40mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 50mm) Direct Drive to a KedaTR2837/18 KV830 (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (7.2v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through EZRUN 18A (10Amps) ESC - Comments: 1950,s. Scratch built. Hull based roughly on a Cris-Craft speed boat which lived in the field beside Jimmy Laird's house. Wooden built mostly 1/16 Obechi. First motor, geared Taycol with horseshoe magnet. Homebullt 27MHz galloping ghost steering only

Skimmer from Mobile Marine by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
Hi Chris Mine just has a large flat ply plate over the bottom of the hull with the rx rudder servo and battery fixed in place. I use velcro for the rx and made mounting blocks for the servo. An aircraft snake connects to the rudder. The battery is in a small wooden compartment. My ESC is just below the motor mount hanging loose. You do need to strengthen the motor mount - I used lots of wood inside to make it all less pliable - the plastic is not strong enough on its own. You need to build a plinth to attach the motor high enough to attach your prop. This need to be well braced to take the thrust from the prop. Mine moves slightly and if I were to make another I would make it stronger. Mine required two small sheets of lead up front to keep it on the water at speed. Please post details of your build Dave

Painting Wood and styrene by chugalone100 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 21 days ago
Hey guys: Im getting ready to slap some paint on my Statia Tug. What kind of paint will be the best to paint my wooden hull and styrene upper structure?

Scale Sailing Association by sunworksco Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 21 days ago
Hello! What a beautiful sail boat! I see many hours in your endeavor. I'm planning to build a 1/16th scale circa 1933 America's Cup Whirlwind sailboat, using a fiberglass molded hull. I'm trying to find some old wooden window blinds, to saw cut into narrow strips for the decks. I'm going to build the cabins out of brass sheet. Have you ever used wooden window blinds for boat builds? Thank you?

Building a deck by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 30 days ago
I began laying the deck on April 5th. It had snowed as recently as the week before, but it finally warmed up enough to use glue. The strips were cut to 6-5/8" length, about 20' in 1:36 scale. I used a black marker on two opposite sides to represent the pitch in the seams. The deck was laid in a 5-plank pattern to mix up the butt-joints as much as I could. My research on her decking found she's had various styles and plank widths over her life. The earliest photo showing her deck that I could find, showed it straight planked with 7 or 8" wide boards based on the number of planks between her waterway and the main hatch coaming. Her waterway logs seem to be placed ON the decking, as there's no margin planks or joggling - even today. The planking was set with gel CA. Gorilla sells it in a nice bottle with a metal pin in the cap to keep the spout open. It would up taking 3 of these bottles to complete the deck. The planks are cut at a 45 on the ends along the fore and aft access hatches, to try and hide this seam as much as possible. Once the deck was down, I scraped it. The glue is more resistant than the basswood is, so sanding would have scalloped the wood between seams. Scraping makes everything level. Some lite sanding, more to polish than remove anything, was done last. I had planned to stain the deck a very light grayish tint, but an active naval vessel gets holy-stoned regularly and wouldn't be gray as the ships that sit at a dock today are. In all it took 455 pieces to complete the deck and there wasn't any scrap longer than 1 inch left over. In all I have 3/4" deck beams, 1/4" plywood, a layer of 4oz cloth and resin, and a 3/16" basswood deck - I don't recall why I designed it so heavy, but it certainly doesn't hurt the model at all, and I think the 3/16" square strip will prove to have been easier to set than the 1/16" x 1/4" planks Pride and Macedonian will get. The deck go a coat of water-based satin poly, and I stared working on hatch coamings, cap log, and waterways. The cabin skylight and two hatched forward of it, including the capstan, and all combined into one hatch where the battery is accessed, and which hides the aft ballast rod and main power switch. The cap logs Are 1/2" wide x 1/4" tall basswood that was tren'led, glued, and copper nailed, onto the deck, flush with the outside of the hull covering this seam completely. The the angled wood waterways were installed around the inside of the cap log, and the deck got a coat of oil-based satin poly. This actually leeched in and made the marker seams bleed a little. In hind sight, I think I'll go with paint over marker for seams in the future. The coamings got painted black. I'm not sure why the Navy painted deck fittings black. It was even common to paint to top surfaces of tops black. I wonder how many injuries and losses this cost the navy that white paint would have prevented. Anyway... Constellation didn't have "solid" bulwarks, but rather she had hammock irons bolted to her cap log. These were removed when Baltimore tried to pass her off as a frigate and tossed in the bilge. When the ship was restored as a sloop of war, they found all but one. These irons are designed to have wooden rails at their tops, inboard and out, and have holes so several lines can be run through them. The Navy in it's wisdom though, decided to wainscot them to appear as solid bulwarks, despite the additional splinter hazard that would be in battle. I wasn't making all those metal stanchions just to hide them under wood and tarps, so I made wood blocks sheathed in sheet bass, scribed to look like vertical wainscotting. It was the end of April by now, and the Baltimore Port Expo was in two weeks. I wanted to have hammocks in the bulwarks, as she appears in the portrait, but there was no time to figure this out, so I layered on some balsa and shaped it so it looked like tarps were laid over the hammocks. When I figure out how I'll represent the stowed hammocks, I can pull the balsa off easily enough. The bulwarks on, I made some fittings for the spencer masts; installed the eye bolts at the base of the masts; made some bollards (or whatever name they gave those posts), made and installed the catheads, which are laminated 1/16" basswood. I then started setting up a jury rig and her controls so she could sail at the Port Expo. I set her t'gallants and all three heads'ls this time around. By the night before the Expo, she was ready to go.

Lindow common. by philpjuk Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Only had one button!as you said,once for right twice for left and once again for straight.Not galloping ghost,I flew that in a "sparky"it was sort of mechanical pulse proportional.Mine had a motorised wooden drum with a triangle of tinplate fastened to it so it reached around drum at one end and finished just short of the other.A moveable wiper slid along the drum so you could get anything from no signal to continuous.As you say the reciever relay pulsed a mighty midget against a spring.It had many problems,the battery drain was high,the thing was continualy twitching and if you flew out of range you got full rudder and a spin!Things are so different now,reliable gear at reasonable prices.But I still cannot remember how that throttle worked!.

Fairy Huntsman by rolfman2000 Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Sparkman. It might help if you tell us what size Huntsman it is. 34" or 46". Also what hull. Either wooden, or glassfibre. Also, what sort of performance you expect of it. Are you using brushed or brushless motors ? Hopefully, if you let the group know, you might get an answer. Best wishes, Dave W 😊

Trawl winch by GrahamP74 Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
The trawl winch is made from a mix of PVA craftboard, plastic plumbing pipe and wooden kebab skewers! The end rollers were turned from metal on the lathe. I tried to get the large nut detail on the inside ends. The warps will be added at a later stage once I have rusted the string!

gantry by GrahamP74 Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
I have made the gantry out of wooden baton and have grooved a channel in one of the legs to hide the wires for the lights. It will be painted and a small element of rust treatment applied at the last stage.

Winch for Emily P II by GrahamP74 Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 5/10] - Comments: Scaled at 1:12 Made of PVA board, plastic water pipe and wooden skewers! The end blocks were made from a steel rod which I turned on the metal lathe. Tried hard to get the large end nut detail. Need to add the warps once I have made the rope rusty looking!

Stanborough Lake. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hi Kipper. Thanks for the link, I had already looked at the site and unfortunately could not visit on the 27th May for their regular lakeside meeting to make contact with club members. However I had previously paid a visit to the lake on Sunday 21st May expecting to see a few boats on the lake on a what was a gloriously sunny afternoon and found not a single boat but plenty of wildfowl and the lake clogged with weed and leaves. It's a nice big stretch of water with plenty of landing stages around the shoreline and on the wooden bridge that separates the pleasure boating lake from the model boating lake but the amount of weed and detritus would make me wary of making a maiden voyage there. By contrast, I visited the lake at Verulam Park St Albans a week earlier and, although not as big, had little or no weed, but a few alarmingly large branches were being thrown into the water by dog walkers who were encouraging their pets to retrieve them, but were ultimately abandoned. Sadly no boats were being sailed there at the time so I could not make any inquiries with their owners. The first 3 pictures are Stanborough and the last 3 are St Albans. I think I know which I prefer but I would still like to have the view of others who use these lakes regularly. All responses welcome....please ! Thanks. Rob.

Fiberglassing by Trillium Commander   Posted: 2 months ago
I have been puzzled by conflicting statements on the web, some stating that adding resin and fibreglass will strengthen wooden construction, and others stating that it will not. For my own understanding I did some tests, which others may find interesting. These are not by any means scientific, and meant only as a guide for me in model construction. The results show that coating balsa with resin and fibreglass cloth does strengthen it. For those who want to see more detail, these are the results. Three separate strips of balsa, each 18" long by 1.5" wide were cut from a single sheet 36" long by 3" wide, 3/32" (2.4mm) thick. Each strip was placed on top of two supports 10" apart. A load was applied in increments to the centre of the span. After testing each strip in its uncoated condition, each one was coated with Deluxe Materials Eze-Kote resin, according to the maker's instructions, and a layer of fibreglass cloth applied on each side. The cloth was a piece I had spare so I don't know what weight it was, but I estimate between 1 and 1.5 oz per sq yd. After coating each strip was tested again. The results are shown in the chart. The lower the deflection when loaded, the stronger the strip. Although all strips were cut from one sheet, strip 3 was clearly stiffer and stronger than the other two in its uncoated state. It benefited least from the addition of the fibreglass. Strips 1 and 2 showed a significant increase in strength.

Slowly does it. by fid2b Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
All getting involved now! I suspect it looks worse in the pictures because the prop thrust will definitely pass over the rudder although perhaps not ideally. And I don't have a cardan shaft, just a uj because as I said, simple appealled for a part time hobby as this is to me. My aim was to see if I could form the wooden hull like my Dad did on the fireboat cos I always admired the shape but of course I would like to finish the job eventually 😀

How do I resolve my varnish problem? by Inkoust Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Hello, I recommend grinding the whole body with fine sanding paper, then take the "LORD NELSON" pore filler and then re-grind it again. Subsequently, the final lacquer of the best brand. I have been treated like a wooden boat DIVA and already for 6 years on the water without any problems. What happened to you is that you used a bad lacquer that does not resist water. Two-component epoxy lacquers are also good for large yachts. I'm sending a link to the Czech site where the varnishes are designed for ship modellers. Just use the Gogle translator and the same merchandise you can get at the shop. Or on EBay. https://www.modelylodi.cz/Laky-a-plnice-c11_86_2.htm😉

Slowly does it. by fid2b Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 2 months ago
After a long pause I am as far as propshaft, motor and rudder installation. I need a servo next but spent all my pocket money climbing a mountain in Wales this month. It was good but wet. The motor lives on the usual alloy bracket, screwed to two wooden plinths made from strip laminated with araldite. It's all standard stuff but making it this way allowed me to shim the height correctly, the strip being about 1.5mm thick. I'll post some pics if I can work out the Google drive thing but you will also see that the lower skins are on and after the servo installation I can think about the upper hull skins and then the superstructure. All good stuff😀.