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>> Home > Tags > wooden

wooden
wooden boat
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wooden
Leaking Boat! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
Wrong place? How do you know that Neville? Once inside the water will run/creep to the lowest position it can reach! I don't like the idea of putting water INSIDE any wooden boat, 😲 not where it's supposed to be . Who knows where it creep to and soak in? Doug 😎 PS Get the visitors involved!😁

Leaking Boat! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 days ago
Hi Neville, Some intriguing suggestions here 😉 Good luck with the bicycle pump 😁 To be brutally frank! There are no short cuts to leak proofing an old wooden hull properly🤔 1 Internal deck / xyz mounting notwithstanding, if there's something wrong with the hull I want to know it so I can fix it - for good! If the probable source of the leak is hidden by some internal deck or mounting for xyz it has to come out! 2 To be honest, looking closely at your pics of the hull underside it's obvious she has had a few knocks. I would want to sand back, seal and repaint at least the red underside. Having so cleaned the hull off I would closely inspect all joints around the keel and chines and look for signs of previous water intrusion and soaking into to keel especially - potential delamination / capillary action through the keel or joints. When the hull is fully dried out and sanded back I would seal it with a couple of coats of Ezekote; the first coat you can thin with a little warm water so that it soaks into the wood better. Don't overdo it, about 10-20% water is enough. Second coat pure resin. If it looks 'patchy' give it another coat of pure resin. Dries so fast all this doesn't take long. Had to do all this on my fish cutter hull, Gina2 - see Blog! Was a sieve to begin with, afterwards she passed her ballast test with flying colours😊 See also my Sea Scout Jessica Blog. After that repeat your bath test, with ballasting to waterline, and KEEP AN EYE ON IT so you can see where any watter creeps in from!😉 If you take a short cut now you may well have to do it again (properly) some time😁 cheers, Doug 😎

20th Scale ELCO 80ft PT boat part 5 by CB90 Admiral   Posted: 11 days ago
After some calculations I find I need to extend the reinforcing for the port & starboard shafts forward towards the bow. Created some wooden guides when drilling the prop-shaft holes and glued them in position temporarily, as you make expect the drill needs to be rather long, so I made one out of an old brass shaft basically sharpening it so it could cut wood. Next job will be to cut out for integrated shaft support brackets (2mm wide and minimum of 35mm long slot) and the tube shafts are 8.5mm in diameter.

Range Safety Launch? by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
The ‘Range Safety Launch’…………. Intro. I am now the owner of this boat. Wooden, good hull lines and hull paint work but needing to be finished. I am told that it looks like it started life as a kit, but has had considerable modification to at least the above deck layout and detail. Advice is that it could be a rather simplified Range Safety Launch, but maybe I can use a little ‘artistic licence’ and just make it look interesting and capable. There are two main reasons for sharing this project. 1. I will undoubtedly need guidance 2. Maybe some of the information will assist others The hull is 44 inches ( 112cm ) long and 14 inches (36cm ) wide, it has two brushed MFA Torpedo 800 motors………. and weighs in currently at 15 lbs 4ozs (6.91 kgs). It is large enough for me to be able to work on reasonably comfortably and apart from the cabin/upper deck areas to be ‘improved’, I aim to introduce sound, lighting, active radar sweep, search light, together with maybe a deck hoist and water /fire monitor appliance. At my age it is difficult to tell the difference between wishful thinking and dementing…… However, the prime aim is to try and achieve at least some of this whilst having the boat usable during the current ‘season’. There is so much knowledge, good will and help available on this site that even before I touched a thing, information came pouring in. If anyone feels like making a contribution then please just ‘pile in’. Have ordered some parts so next time should have something to show. NPJ.

So, why not woodies?... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
Hi all, a coffee break question for you all. You will know me if you know me at all as a lover of the woodie, the mahogany hotrod, the classic speedboat. And I wonder why they are so very rarely modelled. There are plenty of plans for them and a few kits which can be made straight or converted into others. They are well documented on the 'net. There are some wonderful books about them (most of which I have!). Yet where are they all? Surely they are more fun to fling round a pond than some old tanker/coaster. I realise tugs can be made to erm...tug, if the rest of the equipment is available, but it rarely seems to be. Does the glamour of a highly varnished wooden or painted finish with chrome fittings not appeal? Does the average smallness of the classic speedboat not make for easy transport? Not a criticism, just a ponder, but some response would be appreciated. Cheers, Martin

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by Rookysailor Lieutenant   Posted: 16 days ago
Strange that you should mention the Movie/book 'The Cruel Sea', have just bought the DVD from Ebay, looking forward to watching it once again. I have an old Revell corvette kit, and last month bought the NEW corvette kit from Revell which has most of the lighting in kit form, plus revolving radar, but very annoyed 😆to find out that there is no p/e parts or wooden decking as in the platinum edition, but it only cost me £100 + vat trade deal, sssh🤐 Cheers Peter😊

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 16 days ago
Know what you mean Peter, I think, when I get round to her, I'll do mine as 'HMS Compass Rose'. The 'fictitious' ship in Nicholas Monserrat's book 'The Cruel Sea'. Which is based on his experiences on a Flower Class in the Battle of the Atlantic. Well worth a read👍 Difficult to put down 😲 Try Googling and/or Wikiing Flower Class corvette and you should get oodles of links to photos of the originals and suppliers of kits n bits. What you could do of course is to Go The Whole Hog and buy the newer Revell Premium version of the kit. That has wooden decks and a host of detailed upgrade parts. Plus LED lights etc 😊 List price here €199. https://www.revell.de/en/products/revell-technik/flower-clas... Whatever you do, enjoy it😊 Cos otherwise there ain't no point is there!? All the best, Doug 😎

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by Rookysailor Lieutenant   Posted: 16 days ago
Hi Doug, with reference to your wooden decks for the 1/72 flower class corvette, where did you get them from? I'm having trouble getting any browser info🤔 many thanks, Peter😋

Life Boat & Davit! by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 22 days ago
On the life boat, Had to order some black rope! Dumas uses black string. I didn’t like this so found a ship company in New Jersey. They have different size miniature rope. I had ordered some but didn’t know the size! Luckily was able to send back what they had sent me. And was able to send a sample of some tan rope back and a block that dumas sent made of plastic! I want wooden blocks! And black miniature rope. It’ll look more realistic in the long run!

Norfolk Wherry Fans by Nerys Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 26 days ago
There seems to be some misconceptions about Dutch Barges. Most of what we now refer to as Dutch barges were originally developed as fishing boats suited to the area in which they were working. There were many different types and far from just being used on the canals fished all waters of the Netherlands and were quite capable of taking on the sharp nasty seas of places like Hollandsche Diep and the Ooste Schelde. I can assure you, even the Ijselmeer can get choppy under the right conditions. In fact Dutch Schuyts brought cargoes of eels to London from about the 1600s and a berth was still kept for them until the early 20th century, They were typical of what we would now call a Dutch barge. There were quite small ones like the Schouw and the Grundel that were inshore and lake fishers, then they varied in size through the Botters, Hoogars and Lemeraaks to the Tjalk and the Klipper which were cargo carriers. The Klippers were roughly the same size as Thames Barges and sometimes bigger and were rigged as Gaff Ketches, similar to our West Country Ketches. They were mainly fairly heavily built well in keeping with traditional wooden working boats. In latter days, steel replaced wood but they still followed the traditional designs. Luckily, so many Dutch Barges are still being built as yachts, decorated and fitted out very traditionally and there is considerable interest in the many events held for them every year.

Rear Deck assembly –(upper tow deck) by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 29 days ago
I propose to make the rear deck and the deck which carries the tow hook all as a complete piece that lifts out in one. Although its going to be in one piece the full assembly still has to be made as separate components so first job is to cut the individual panels again using the card inserts to make sure the end assembly has clearance. The tow hook deck is the first piece to be dealt with and epoxied as a sub assembly. Having completed the wooden frame I then took a break and did some more planking, first a mahogany boarder and then glue a black card calk around its inside edge, next cut and sand each plank to fit in the space left, these could then be glued in place with a black card calk between each plank. After a period of drying I sanded the whole surface level. Next I put the nail holes in again using the jig I made to ensure uniform spacing and then gave a coat of sanding sealer. When the rest of the subassemblies are complete they will all be lacquered together before final assembly.

Fitting Propshafts by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Rather than a model of a rope making machine, Doug, this is a machine for making model rope. Always wanted one, in case I ever make that marvellous wooden ship model. Martin

54 year old Crash Tender by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Nice One Cyril😉👍 Too'ot 'ere as well, so stayed in and made the propshaft and tooob for the fish cutter. Just tap drilled the prop to take a 3mm thread. Now to figure out the gearbox frames 😲 Everyone seems to be going Mast Crazy tonight so I guess I'd better make one for the Sea Scout 🤔 The cutter need a lot of complicated wooden bits, so that can wait till I've figured out how it's all supposed to work 😲 Transistors an' diodes an' such are so much easier 😉 Carry on Sarn't Major, 😁 Cheers, Doug 😎

Fibreglass the hull- continued by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Now the Chine rubbing strakes are fitted, dry and filled and I have attended to the minor lumps and bumps the next job is to give another coat of resin, taking the issues of the first application into account I intend to apply a thin coat, this has the effect of filling in the pattern of the glass cloth. Another two days have passed and it’s time to do some rubbing down. I have found that the surface is very hard, more so than I recall some of the other fibre glass projects I have done but these have been using Polyester resin. It’s a first for epoxy, so is epoxy a better choice than Polyester? According to my mini research –  Epoxy is more versatile  Epoxy has fewer fumes  Epoxy is stronger  Epoxy shrinks less Conclusion Epoxy is the better choice for repairing/covering either wooden hulls or repairing fiberglass boats. It has excellent adhesive qualities, wets out fiberglass fabrics and it is tough. It has great thin film cure characteristics, cures in cool temperatures. After the first coat I wasn’t 100 % happy with the finish but I just thought that some dust had landed on the surface before the resin had dried, (this was proved not to be dust but because of the matting pattern still been visible it disguised the real problem) however this was easily sanded out with wet & dry. Now the hull and deck were looking really smooth with very little sign of the matting pattern it was time to give a final coat. I had decided to coat both the deck and the hull in one go so I mixed enough resin to do the lot. Starting with the deck I started to apply the resin but to may horror it started to pin prick all over the deck surface, panic, panic what was causing this? So was it the brush which I had previously washed out with cellulose thinners after applying the last batch of resin. I decided to remove the resin and use a new brush (I had 90 mins cure time to do this) so cleaning of with paper towel and finally with a wipe with thinners I started to apply resin again – but it happened again as I sat in despair I looked into the pot of resin wondering where to go next when I saw a film on the top of the remaining resin It was then I noticed a ridge in the cups side. It was the wax coating that had melted into the resin and subsequently appeared as pin pricks in the newly applied surface. At this realisation I removed all the resin again and took a breather hoping I had found the problem. Another day and a light rub down of the deck to make sure the surface is ready to receive its final coat. Resin weighed (in a glass container this time) and well mixed I started to apply again and fortunately it was OK and all surfaces were coated.

Warped wood by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Evenin' All, I had the same problem with the cabin roof of Dad's 1962/3 built Sea Scout. First I thought I could just remove the ply tops and flatten them, hot water and then under a car battery overnight. But the ply was cracked and curled just at the overhang so even after gluing, soaking and straightening it was still cracked and useless. So finally I soaked the frame alone in hot water and left it under the battery for a day and a night, with suitable wedges to get the right shape . In the meantime I made new roof skins from 1.5mm mahogany. Worked out quite nice in the end. Took a while though to get it right, especially along the centre line seam. Then I set 5mm round neodymium magnets in the corners, with counter parts set on wooden brackets inside the cabin walls to hold it on at speed on the wet stuff. Before assembling and varnishing with Lord Nelson spray gloss varnish I sealed all parts with two coats of Lord Nelson spray wood seal. Survived it's sea trials quite well. https://youtu.be/zPgYicA0yGw Penultimate pic shows the before 🤔, last pic shows the after 😉(while fitting new tinted windows) Cheers, Doug 😎