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    Directory
    (Working Vessel) Northlight Clyde Puffer
    The Clyde Puffer is a Caldercraft kit of 1:32 scale. it is a representative model of a typical small coaster from the Western isles of Scotland, known to many ship lovers as a 'Clyde Puffer'. it has a GRP hull which has full external detail, riveting, strakes etc. and a plywood superstructure and decking plus over 200 white metal fittings. As usual for Caldercraft you need to have your thinking cap on as the A0 plan and the 'instruction book' do not match up but of course they do expect you to have a little bit of experience in model building. it has taken me about 6 months to build, but working on and off over this time. it has a large hull which is easy to house the motor, ESC, RC and batteries, etc. (I installed 2 lead acid 6 volt batteries, one on each side amidships) which gives stability and
    ballast
    . Being a large deep hull it needs a lot of
    ballast
    , even in its short length. I have only tested her in the big white test tank at home so do not know how it will perform on our lake. I have sailed her many times on our lake and she certainly sails well. I installed an electronic switch for the navigation lights and gives a good effect during the darker afternoons/evening. (Motor: MFA) (ESC: Viper Marine 15) (9/10)
    3 years ago by ads90
    Forum
    Anteo 2 Tug
    Hi Havelock, this is my first boat build,been doing rc model aircraft for 60 years,I know all there is about brushless motors and lipos.The kit specified lead acid batteries and I am using a 2_1 mfa motor and gearbox not quite sure what esc I have got. Lot of this was guesswork.The lead acid batteries will complement whatever
    ballast
    I need.2x6v in parallel and I can tap of 12 v for lights smoke etc I think.
    4 months ago by Dick
    Forum
    U49 Mclaren Clockwork Submarines.
    Ahoy Mateys,17 inch, U49 has a 3 plate hull made from an old Panettone tin,it has two
    ballast
    tanks and a powerful single spring clockwork motor. The diving planes are a through hull type and quite large because its bit of a lump to dynamic dive, to assist diving it has 350g of lead trim in the bilge.
    5 months ago by mactin
    Forum
    Emma C. Berry
    I was thinking of external
    ballast
    , but if the bulb and fin has been used successfully then by all means use it. I would think that it would have to be as streamlined as possible in order to make the least impedance, but as I have said, I know more about full sized craft than I do models.
    5 months ago by Nerys
    Blog
    PS Iona - misc fittings
    A bit of a miscellany here - the funnel fittings or mounts at the top are 3D printed and the 'rope' is some sort of elastic string used in jewellery making. This... 1) keeps it straight which is difficult with regular string or wire, 2) doesn't get damaged when you catch it with a stray arm, tool, etc. Brass steam fittings turned on my lathe. The forward hatch was built in case extra
    ballast
    was needed, but has had a beneficial side effect. No
    ballast
    was needed and the hatch is filled with foam, so I can wedge in a mini tripod and mount a camera up front. Only briefly tested but looks promising The windlass is a kit from mobile marine models. Easy to construct and looks the part. Tow hook 3D printed.
    5 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Blog
    PS Iona -
    ballast
    Well I said in blog 1 this was a mixed media ship... I forgot to mention the concrete. The bathtub test showed that the ship sailed ON the water rather than in it, so some serious
    ballast
    weight needed to be added. As I don't have any spare lead, and buying the amount needed would be expensive, I discovered an old bag of cement in the shed. Excellent! I roughly calculated how much to use to infill the base of the tug - about 1 inch depth distributed bows to stern, up to the level of the frames, so I could fit a wooden floor to mount the motors / electronics onto. Luckily this came out about right, and the paddles would sit in the water correctlyπŸ€“
    5 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Blog
    Paddle Tug Iona- paddle boxes & superstructure
    Building the paddle boxes was remarkably easy, once the 1mm ply had been steamed for bending. I decided to build the boxes first and make sure the paddles fitted inside later, the idea being that all this would come apart for maintenance should it be necessary. (it usually is!). There are few models to be found on the internet to use as reference and hardly any images of the original tug. And to confuse matters, PS Iona also existed as a passenger ship, as well as tug, and looked a bit different. The superstructure is really simple and quick to build, with some more planking! Am liking planking small areas now. The funnels came from some scrap plastic tubing in the garage... just the right diameter too, a lucky find. These will screwed in place from below once I have the other funnel parts made. I plan to run the tug on batteries rather than steam, as I am a relative novice to model boat building. The whole deck will be fitted with 1mm ply as a base before... more planking! Before all this is glued in place, I thought it best to water test the ship first and see how much
    ballast
    I am likely to need.
    5 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Forum
    Emma C. Berry
    Do you really need the bulb and fin? They are normally fitted to a shallow draft hull. A displacement hull like yours normally has
    ballast
    incorporated into the keel. if you think there is insufficient
    ballast
    at the moment, I'm sure you could find a way of attaching some extra, moulded onto the keel.
    5 months ago by Nerys
    Forum
    SS HUNAN drawings
    Very good so far. The hull has been tested and the prop and rudder tested and now am creating
    ballast
    by making lead blocks to suit. The Glasgow archives had plans and photos and the staff was very obliging. Also I have found that the Swires ship business archive is held in London and they have a plan showing the changes which were made in 1953 or 1958. I cannot determine yet which because the image in the email reply was not of high definition. The staff there to date have been helpful. Then I will have to decide on whether to proceed with the later fitting out ore finish the superstructure in its original as fitted. Built in 1932 and scrapped in 1962 clearly it remained in its original fitting twice longer than the time from re- fitting to being scrapped. Likely this would account for the lack of photos in its second fitting. Don't have all the details but it largely appears to be an addition of poop deck superstructure and to such on the rear main deck. Needless there will be details lost or added in the area where these rooms were added. So will have to compare and decide and finish the build. If I can see a copy of the drawing for the revised fitting I will likely make a list and images for the benefit of others in treated in building this vessel. Toby
    6 months ago by Toby
    Response
    Cracked Battery!
    Hi Doug, No, I mean $40.00 for all three Batteries! But, I'm still looking! I found one for $23.33. It's 6 volts at 8.5Ah and it weighs 3.1 Lbs. Which is just the right
    ballast
    for Tug Brooklyn! Also ample power 1.5 hour run.....πŸ‘
    6 months ago by figtree7nts
    Response
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Hi A few pics of my modify setup, no pics before hand. Moving weight fore or adding
    ballast
    works better than wedges. Only tested the boat by myself and I gave it a real workout. Motor 3639-1100kv, 60A ESC, 5800mah Lipo and 37mm 3blade prop. A 40mm 2blade works better and uses a bit less power. Rudder blade size 30mm across the top, 22mm across the bottom, 45 deep and the shaft 10mm from the leading edge. Sharpen the leading edge and the trialing edge flat. This catches are air in the water and send it to the surface. Canabus
    6 months ago by canabus
    Forum
    ice thing
    Jacko, Should work but you might need to put some lead
    ballast
    on it so it doesn't just blow away. Let us know how it goes. Joe
    6 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    New Batteries!
    Captain's Log: Well, I order new batteries for the Tug Brooklyn. I placed the order about a week ago. I received them last night! Before I continue let me say this. I was using the Batteries from Tug Serenity AKA Jersey City! Those Batteries are 6 Volts at 2.5 Amps! For a total of two! I saw what I thought were the same battery. Only at 6 Volts at 8 Amps. For a total of 12 Volts at 8 Amps! Well the batteries are huge! I had to take all of the Forward
    ballast
    out of Tug Brooklyn! Even then she's a bit bow heavy. But, I really want the extra Power! Because Tug Brooklyn is a 12 Volt Tugboat! Take a look at the Batteries side by side. It's a good thing there's enough room in her forecastle! I'm putting the Batteries end to end and they fit! Oh, the Batteries weigh 6.5 LBS!😱
    6 months ago by figtree7nts
    Response
    Crack in Seam Update!
    Star date 29.12.18 Supplemental 00.52 😁 I hope it works too Ed. πŸ‘ Don't forget to seal any exposed wood before dunking it again. And I would recommend putting all the
    ballast
    and batteries back in (at least loosely) to recreate actual sailing conditions; i.e. water pressure on the potential leak area. I wondered why you went to such lengths anyway. Had similar problems with the restorations of my Sea Scout and fish cutter. I simply soaked the affected areas in resin, inside and out, while holding in clamps. Sand, fill (Bondo?😁), sand, paint and Bob's yer uncle and Fanny's yer Aunt 😁😁 Nevertheless; hope it works for you Ed, cheers, Doug 😎
    7 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    U48 Tinplate Clockwork Diving Submarine
    Ahoy Mateys, U48,this ones taken me ages due to a brief hiatus brought on by a touch of black death I caught. Anyway another bin salvaged effort made entirely from scrap tin and alarm clocks. No
    ballast
    tank in this one,the smaller boats don't need them and dynamic dive on planes alone,or just surface run. Cheers Neil www.mclarenclockworksubmarines.com
    7 months ago by mactin
    Blog
    Crack in Seam Update!
    Captain's Log: Supplemental Well, today was a good day to fix. The leak in Brooklyn's aft end! I scraped off the paint around the skeg area and boss! I then took a piece of 10mm x 110mm plastic. And glued it to the seam. Making sure to cover the area. That was cracked and leaking! I am then going to let the glue set over night. If all goes well, the leak should stop..... I will reassemble her aft end. And do a Domestic Test Tank Test! If the Test Succeeds. I will then repaint the aft end of the tug! And put all of her
    ballast
    back and her batteries! Hope my repair works!!!
    7 months ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    Kingfisher by Norstar upgrades
    Ron Great to hear about this. I had a Kingfisher in 1972, powered by a DC Sabre 1.49 marine diesel. The engine was mounted just aft of the windscreen and it needed a a lot of
    ballast
    . With such a small engine and the additional weight the performance was mediocre. Is this kit in production again? if it is I might build one . Maybe this time I will fit a brushless running on lipos . This will give the model the performance it deserves. Boaty😁
    7 months ago by boaty
    Response
    Hum, Now What!
    Hi Joe, Thanks for the idea! I'm going to take the boat apart! I have to take her
    ballast
    out! Take her batteries out! I think she's leaking from where the prop shaft. comes out of the Boss! So, I'm going to make a flange. Which will be the same size as the Boss. And will cover the Boss! Hopefully this will fix the leak problem! Regards, Ed
    7 months ago by figtree7nts
    Response
    Hum, Now What!
    Ed, Tilt the boat up and just pour two part epoxy into this area. I always do this, first I glue tack the stuffing tube to insure alignment. Then pour in the epoxy usually along with lead bird shot or bb's for
    ballast
    . Joe
    7 months ago by Joe727
    Directory
    (Tug Boat) Brooklyn Steam Tug
    I built this from a Dumas Tug Kit, nice kit with lots of detail. Two SLA batteries provide
    ballast
    along with lead weight. Gearing is from an older type model aircraft type. ESC is a marine type, forward, backward drive, big 4" Dumas prop. This tug is back in dry dock for addition of led navigational lighting. The initial build was undertaken while I was battling stage 4 cancer, it keep my mind occupied during chemo and surgery recovery, stayed positive! Model building is very meditative to me, try it if you have't, Have fun. Photos to come once out of dry dock. (Motor: 550 dc) (ESC: Tamar T15) (8/10)
    7 months ago by Joe727
    Response
    Upper & Lower Chines
    Thats coming on nicely and as you say it looks quite a rigid construction. How much of a bonus is a lightweight construction V an all ply construction as I assume you may have to put some
    ballast
    in the finished model. not thtat I have any experience on the subject
    7 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Thunder Tiger Avanti
    Has anyone done any significant modifications to a Thunder Tiger Avanti fast electric? I have one and all I have done is to replace the nylon prop with a metal one thus there is very little increase in performance and the reason for doing this was due to the nylon prop throwing a blade after striking an underwater object. Prestwich Model Boats have a suitable replacement motor complete with a better ESC than the existing Ace one and their system can handle up to 4S Lipos instead of the stock set up of 3s . I have located a source of a 4S Lipo which length and width is same as my 3S one but the height is a little more and it will fit into the battery box. To trim it out properly I would have to add some
    ballast
    to the starboard side. Due to the electrics including the battery all being in a small watertight box at the stern there is not a great amount of scope for a lot of mods. Boaty😁
    7 months ago by boaty
    Forum
    Proximity (Hall effect) sensor wiring
    If the intention is to switch on with the magnet then remove it then you will need the reed switch already mentioned plus a latching relay. In use you would apply the magnet which will switch the relay which in turn will switch the ESC. A second application of the magnet will unlatch the relay. Possible choice of relay. Relay https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/5v-12v-24V-Coil-Bistable-Latching-Relay-DPDT-2A-30VDC-High-Quality/113232919274?hash=item1a5d353aea:m:mH8OjtWO_5VZ843iolIqa6A:rk:3:pf:0 He would need to consider carefully that he still has power to the safety backup which will blow
    ballast
    a certain time after loss of signal. Steve
    8 months ago by steve-d
    Directory
    (Naval Ship) HMS Cadiz
    Scratch built other than a fibreglass hull, built by my father over about 5 years using a mix of balsa, plasticard, ply and wire. He never sailed it but when I inherited it I was determined to complete it ready for it's first "sea trials". I've completed the RC installation and adjusted the
    ballast
    and it's now had two successful outings at the local boating lake. (10/10)
    8 months ago by landie
    Forum
    Bristol pilot cutter mascotte
    Hello all this is my latest build of the Kingston mouldings Bristol pilot cutter 'mascotte' was purchased from a forum friend who no longer had time to build it. Sadly Kingston mouldings has now closed down. The first job was to glue the lead
    ballast
    into the bottom of the hull, this was done by using fibreglass resin then a couple of layers of fibreglass to seal the lead shot into the built in keel
    1 year ago by kmbcsecretary
    Forum
    happy hunter
    I haven't done a great deal to the happy hunter over the last months but the superstructure and masts are almost finished.I want to get the
    ballast
    in it next .I,ve got 2 -6 volt batteries in and tried about 1kg of lead at each end -this isn't enough .I would welcome thoughts on what weight will be needed in addition to the batteries -I,m thinking a total of 4kg.Also any ideas on getting the lead moulded to the right shape for the bottom of the hull would be appreciated
    8 months ago by spitfiresooty
    Forum
    Ship rudders
    Couple of other plates. When I have finished the rudder and housed it to the rudder post and sorted the rc control linkage for it I will take out too the pond for
    ballast
    ing and a swim. Once I know how much and where
    ballast
    ing is needed I shall insert aluminium angle in to the hull to house lead acid batteries and lead blocks.
    8 months ago by Toby
    Forum
    SLA question
    Hi J Barry, most of my larger boats use 12v 7ah sla's I have even used them laying flat and as
    ballast
    . Never had a problem with them at any angle. Hope this helps you. Cheers Colin.
    8 months ago by Colin H
    Forum
    Brixham trawler IBEX
    I`m building a Brixham trawler IBEX Anyone know how much
    ballast
    is needed for a scratch built hull would it be wise to use a bulb on a fin or along lead keel
    2 years ago by bellman1942
    Response
    coastguard
    Good morning Doug the CoG will be determined when the superstructure is completed then lead
    ballast
    will be added the batteries are in the best place possible any lower and they would have been obstructing the propshafts have a nice day Bob 😜
    8 months ago by Northumbrian
    Directory
    (Other) A577
    This model belongs to a friend of mine who had this in his attic where it got damaged and its condition deteriorated, he asked me if I would refurbish it. This is a static model and I have submitted this to help to show the variety of craft that the RAF Marine Branch operated in the 68 years of its existence. The Armoured Target Boat was the brainchild of the Air Ministry's "I've had a good idea" Department. The requirement was for a target boat that could be bombed from the air with practice bombs. The 40ft Armoured Target Boats were developed from the slightly smaller 37.5ft ATBs which had been designed by Scott-Paine and others at British Power Boat in 1932. A couple of years later, in 1934, whilst bringing the first of the 64ft HSLs into service, it was realised by the Air Ministry that the condition of the aircraft had been advancing and that it was necessary to provide additional protection to improve the first type of Armoured Target Boats (the 37.5ft type). T.E. Shaw suggested to Scott-Paine that he should increase the length of the 37.5ft type to 40ft and fit twin rudders. in addition the Air Ministry prepared a new armour plating arrangement which gave separate protection for the crew and engines and coxswain. There was a further alteration to the forward bulkhead which resulted in it being changed to vertical instead of raked fore and aft to overcome the new conditions for bombing. A long series of trials were carried out with the
    ballast
    with the 40ft type launch and eventually it was approved. The 40ft thus became the standard type Armoured Target Boat (ATB). The first batch of 15 craft of the 40ft type were ordered in 1935 with further batches being ordered in 1936, 1937 and 1938. A further addition was the introduction of a 3rd engine, this helped to maintain a good speed on the ranges, and helped to counterbalance the the boat as it had been found that in a tight turn the 37.5ft ATB had a tendency to roll over. (5/10)
    8 months ago by colindavies
    Forum
    A return to the hobby!
    I also tend to use Sla batteries a model this size should easily be able to take a 12v 7ah battery, some of my models I have to use 2 batteries, 1for
    ballast
    or in parallel to give longer running time. The 660 motor should be fine, what size prop are you going to use. Cheers Colin.
    8 months ago by Colin H
    Directory
    (Naval Ship) HMS Launceston Castle
    Successor to Flower Class Corvettes. This Castle Class built from scratch. As my first scratch built boat I decided to build with "surf board" keel that carries all the
    ballast
    . Model handles perfectly with no "Nodding" and rolling like a toy in rough water. Keel acts as display stand when ashore. Took 2 years to build. Pic's taken at various stages of construction on and off the water. (ESC: Mtronics Viper Marine 15) (5/10)
    8 months ago by Joburg-sailor
    Forum
    Brixham trawler IBEX
    Edward Thanks - just one question, if your model is twice scale does this mean my tube should be about one inch behind the mast? I aim to complete the boat before testing the weight of
    ballast
    needed then like you, allocating most to the keel and some to 'trimming' Sam
    8 months ago by sam
    Response
    36'' Thames River Police Launch by Robbob
    Hi Peter. It shouldn't need
    ballast
    ing very much if at all. As I won't be able to adjust the position of any heavy components I'll use small pieces of lead to adjust fore/aft and port/starboard trim. Robbob.
    8 months ago by robbob
    Blog
    First Dip !!
    Hi All The boat had it's first
    ballast
    test today. Started with 14 and1/2 pounds and had to add another pound and 1/2. No leaks!!! Canabus
    8 months ago by canabus
    Forum
    Landing Ship Tanks (WW2)
    I have a hankering to build an LST and although I could probably build a reasonable representation from photos, I would like to get hold of some plans. There seem to be plans available for the smaller landing craft like LCTs and LCMs but nothing for LSTs, the only ocean going landing craft of WW2. Over a thousand were built, all in the USA, despite being a British conception, only 113 were actually built for the Royal Navy. They were 328 ft long with 50 ft beam and were fitted with
    ballast
    tanks, similar to submarine types to enable them to run well up onto a beach to unload their cargo of tanks and other vehicles. They only needed 3ft6ins water under the bow to beach. Doors opened and a ramp came down. Really they were the forerunners of the RoRo ferry. My interest in building one is because my late father, a Lieutenant Commander, RNR, captained LST 368. all through the North Africa, Sicily and Italian campaigns. Would be pleased to hear if anyone can help me locate plans. Cheers, Nerys.
    9 months ago by Nerys
    Forum
    Vic Smeed's 'Waterbaby'
    You don't need an expert. Just go for it carefully yourself. Lead is easy to drill.Re internal
    ballast
    I would remove at least part of the deck to looksee.πŸ‘
    9 months ago by onetenor
    Media
    kipper
    aero-naut mowe 2 kit. my first rc model boat with a few extras.The kit was ok to build but the prop coupling was a length of silcone tube ? it spun off at the first test run.This was the start of me fitting universal couplings to my boats.The company were being mean using a cheap piece of tube.It runs very quiet and smooth but needed a lot of front end
    ballast
    .i made this to try and drag my grandson away from his ipad,phone and the game of fortnite .I tried to get him to help build and run it but to no avail.I now am enjoying a second childhood building boat kits !
    9 months ago by keithtindley
    Forum
    Vic Smeed's 'Waterbaby'
    Thanks for the advice. I have changed to a smaller battery and moved it fwrd (it is R/C). I have also tried to see if there is any internal
    ballast
    but that's not easy without removing the deck. I think its time to drill the lead keel as suggested. I have found a local expert who says he will do the job! Will report on progress. Many thanks. John
    9 months ago by Xtal
    Forum
    Vic Smeed's 'Waterbaby'
    As Westie said don't use a Forstner it will take out too much at once. Use the 8 mm evenly both sides. Go gently.πŸ‘πŸ‘ Also see if any
    ballast
    has been added inside. This was often done to reduce heeling . it defeated it's own object as reducing the freeboard still put the lee rail under when heeling. Also what batteries are you using? A change to lighter ones may help. Lipos maybe but they may reduce duration.Nimhs may be a compromise. Or the ABC types All this assuming you are using R/c.
    9 months ago by onetenor
    Forum
    Your ideas on how to stabilize a flat-bottomed freighter.
    Hi Ron, had the same problem with my 8'-6'' HMS Fearless when I first launched it. Took out all the
    ballast
    , weighed it then replaced it with a solid steel keel on edge bolted to the underside of my boat.... cured and never any more problem since. Fast boats go past it and it sits still with the wake going along side, just like the real one. it gave the boat a stabilising keel and put all the
    ballast
    60 mm lower than being inside the boat. Good luck with yours, interested as to how it turns out.
    9 months ago by DennisRobotham
    Response
    USCG POINT GLAS
    Good idea boxing in the
    ballast
    .Even bagged sometimes moves around.Lovely looking model.Great job.
    9 months ago by Donnieboy
    Response
    USCG POINT GLAS
    Superb work, as ever from you ZdenekπŸ‘πŸ‘πŸ‘ Look forward to seeing her in action! Wondered what you'd been up to lately. Like how you've boxed in the
    ballast
    . Good idea which I'll copy in my Plastic Magic conversions. Alles gute, Doug 😎
    9 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Your ideas on how to stabilize a flat-bottomed freighter.
    Think a bilge keel should be the first step. My next suggestion would be to add some of the
    ballast
    to a removable fin keel, bolted to the underside of the hull. This will increase the righting moment, but not the weight. This can be seen if you examine U Tube videos of cruise ships and liners. They have so much superstructure they are inherently unstable. Have built several freighters and always fit captive nuts into the keel or underside. These are intended for trunnion display mounts, but have always been prepared to bolt a keel on if needed. The nuts can easily be sealed when sailing.
    9 months ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    Vic Smeed's 'Waterbaby'
    I think a Forstner cutter would be a bit vicious for lead and a bit big. Use say an 8mm drill and use a drill with a decent speed control. Start the holes by hand to ensure they go where you want. I would say start by drilling in the aft part of the keel as the boat appears to be arse down a bit. if there's any internal
    ballast
    , move it forrard. Cheers, Martin
    9 months ago by Westquay
    Media
    Robert E Perry
    Robert E Perry test. Sea trials
    ballast
    seams good.
    9 months ago by Mikep
    Blog
    Deans Robert E. Perry Libertyship
    Added 5 lbs of shot to the hull and installed sub floor.
    11 months ago by Mikep
    Forum
    EarlyVosper M.T.B by Simplas
    Found on E Bay but sold in June of this year, a 42 inch kit of a Simplas Marine Construction Vosper M.T.B. It would appear that there are not many about now. I built one in 1972 and the kit contained a fibreglass hull with all fittings including the guns being in cast metal. Deck and superstructure were plywood and the boat was a model of an early Vosper as it had a very narrow beam and torpedo tubes were towards the stern. I fitted a DC Sabre 1.5cc diesel but had to add a lot of
    ballast
    which resulted in a sharp drop in performance. This was solved by replacing the Sabre with a Fuji 15 marine version glowplug engine . The boat was free running and as I was on an apprentice engineers pay and could not afford r.c.as I was having to support an ageing Mini. This was my transport from Ellesmere Port to the boating lake in New Brighton. If I had bought a Taycol Supermarine motor it would have solved all my problems as the battery would have been the
    ballast
    . Boaty 😁
    10 months ago by boaty
    Forum
    EarlyVosper M.T.B by Simplas
    "Maybe but
    ballast
    ,is
    ballast
    ,is
    ballast
    . However it's achieved." Sure John, but at least a heavy battery is useful load and not 'just'
    ballast
    .πŸ˜‰ Have no idea what shaft power the Fuji produces (only know their excellent 35mm filmπŸ˜‰) but the Taycol Supermarine is rated at 22.5mHP (22.5/1000HP) at 3.5A, 4000rpm. Efficiency 52% πŸ€” so you have to stick twice as much electrical power in to achieve that! Sooo, given that 1HP = 745.7 Watts - And electrically P=IxV (Current x Volts) 22.5/1000HP = (745.7*22.5)/1000 = 16.778W so ~33.55W in. Thus if I = 3.5A they must have done that test / measurement at about 9.6V. The Supermarine also runs great at 12V but maybe not with max efficiency!? With a spec weight of 2&1/2 lb i don't even want to get into Power to Weight Ratio, although I measured Colin's motor at 947gm = 2.0877776229lb πŸ˜‰ But then, some of the motor had corroded away As I'm currently renovating a Supermarine for Colin H. This makes me start thinking about rigging up a test jig so I can see what it actually produces!!! Always up for a challenge 😁 Got nowt else to do 😁😁 Would be useful for other motors as well if I can get it figured outπŸ˜‰ Happy fiddlin' folks, cheers, Doug 😎
    10 months ago by RNinMunich


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