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    Blog
    36'' Thames River Police Launch by Robbob
    After the successful build of the β€˜Vintage Model Works’ RAF Crash Rescue Tender I was asked by Mike Cummings of VMW if I would undertake to build a prototype of their new model with the aim of checking the construction method and the assembly instructions for accuracy before the kit is put into production. The model is a β€˜Thames River Police Launch’ and is based on the original design by Phil Smith for the Veron company, this was a very popular model kit in the late 50’s and 60’s and sold for the princely sum of 43 shillings and tuppence, approximately Β£2.15 in today’s money but an equivalent cost of Β£48.50 in 1960. This design has been updated to accommodate
    electric
    propulsion and radio control by Colin Smith, the son of the original designer and it has been re-scaled to be 36” in length where the original was 24” which gives much more scope for detailing and provides more β€˜hiding room’ for the drive, control systems and all the associated wiring. The kit produced by VMW uses the same construction techniques as the original and the materials are a combination of balsa and plywood both of which a laser and CNC cut for precision. The ply and balsa materials supplied are of very high quality as one would expect from VMW and all the stripwood for the chines, rubbing strakes and deck detailing is included, even the dowel required for the mast is in the box, very comprehensive! The kit also includes white metal fittings such as the fairleads and stanchions, and the searchlight and horns. The glazing for the windows comes in the kit too. The instruction sheet supplied is in need of revision as it is largely taken directly from the original as written by Phil Smith and some of the terminology needs updating, for instance the ply bottom and side skins are referred to as β€˜strakes’ but I understand that a re-write of the instructions is in hand along with an updated plan showing the best positioning for the motor, prop-shaft, battery, ESC, receiver, rudder and servo. During construction I have added a few additional pieces of ply or balsa as reinforcement or supports and substituted some balsa parts for ply where I thought a stronger material would be better. I also added some hatches to give access to the wiring at the bow and the rudder & servo at the stern but largely I have not gone β€˜off plan’ to any extent. The pictures show the model in it’s present state (Nov 2018) and is ready for painting and finishing.
    8 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    Anteo 2 Tug
    You can power a brushless from lead acid batteries
    electric
    is
    electric
    . Lipo batteries are often used because of their ability to provide power with a relatively low weight and can dump LOTS of amps. As Colin pointed out 2 6volt batteries in parallel will provide 6 volts and cannot be tapped for 12v to obtain 12v the batteries need to be in series and 6 volts can be tapped off but will only provide the energy from one of the two batteries.
    4 months ago by Haverlock
    Forum
    What size brushless motor?
    I'm building a new Fairey Hunstman 31 from a kit bought through SLEC. It has provision for a single prop shaft and I've bought a 2 bladed plastic x-shape prop, 25mm based on a recommendation from SLEC. What is the best/most efficient/most powerful brushless
    electric
    motor/ battery combination I can fit? I'm a novice at this and my previous boat kit had all parts supplied. Thank you in anticipation....πŸ‘
    5 months ago by StuartE
    Forum
    soldering
    If your using an
    electric
    soldering iron avoid " active" fluxes if your willing to use a flame then good old fashioned " killed spirits" is as fine a flux as your going to find for soft soldering. Thinking about things if your using an IC engine and your making a prop shroud then please consider hard ( silver ) solder. Just think about the effect of a failed joint and a rapidly spinning prop. if your joining tubes at app 90 degrees think about drilling the tube your going to join to and fitting a spigot to solder the joining tube to. Making a good mechanical joint is an almost essential requirement for a sound long lasting soldered joint.
    5 months ago by Haverlock
    Forum
    Being Sociable.
    I have two steam boats, an Alexandra and a Tug which was destined for the bin, until my friend suggested that he may know someone who wanted it. I refurbished the boat and the steam plant went to Clevedon Steam who stripped it, reset the burner etc and added a few new bits, glass water gauge etc. The rudder is controlled by an
    electric
    motor, NOT a servo, so you have to return the motor to central after a manouevre, so you have to think well ahead of where you are, and where you want to be!!
    5 months ago by CaptainFlack
    Blog
    electric
    s in the cabin
    Progress on the main build is slowed at the moment so that I can complete the
    electric
    al installation. I have decided to route all of the wires inside of the original outer sleeve. I have removed the wires and replaced only the ones I need. I have stuck them to the inside walls as I do not like them hanging everywhere. Perhaps they look a little like insulated pipes, at least that is what I tell myself. I have terminated all of the wires into two 9 pin connectors. These will then connect directly into a small ABS enclosure where I have a flasher circuit and a pcb with all of the resistors for the LED`s. I have wired in this manner so that all I need to do to completely remove the cabin is to disconnect the two connectors.All of the remaining circuits can remain in the hull. A little more work is required in the hull to fit and wire the switches to operate the equipment from other switches on the transmitter.😊
    5 months ago by MouldBuilder
    Forum
    Being Sociable.
    My Dear Gary, If you wish to start a Steamer thread then why not title it as such? In no way did I wish to be AntiSocial. I simply responded to your somewhat provocative question, which I quoted in my previous post, as did several others on the site in similar vein. Whilst I admire those who can build steam engines, and I have done that on this site, I simply listed in my response to your (perhaps rhetorical question?) the obstacles that most modellers are faced with when it comes to steam power in models. Perhaps I should have added number 7. - For most of us the SHIP is the main objective and not the power plant which in the vast majority of cases is hidden under deck. If steam is your THING - GREAT I have no problem with that. More power to your boiler 😊 It just won't work in my ships and boats. Esp. my subs πŸ˜‰ And I don't have the patience for all the faffing about necessary to get going at the lake - one of my six points mentioned above. And I suspect that goes for many other contributors to this site. My post simply consolidated several similar responses from other members. You write; "I could correct all six points that you felt you had to share ..." I would be MOST interested to read your refuting of ALL my six points if you have some valid arguments. Throughout my professional engineering life I have always been open to alternative ideas and solutions. So prove me wrong and uncross my wires please. I look forward to your point by point refutation. BTW; as an experienced electronics engineer I always carefully double check my circuits before applying power - so crossed wires are not normally a problem with me. Similar principle also applies to my considered response to your posts. Regards, Doug 😎 PS: did you build your steam engines or buy them? There are some guys on this site whom I admire very much, but can not emulate, who build their own. PPS: Quote "In the fifty years or so I have been involved in this hobby I have NEVER ever installed an
    electric
    motor in a boat." Fine, if that's your THING, does come across as a little fanatical though.πŸ€”
    5 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Being Sociable.
    I would have loved to put a steam plant in Tug Brooklyn. But, one is cost the other would be. The Brooklyn is all Plastic! Now really have you looked at the prices! Talk about sticker shock! And for that reason. I use
    electric
    motors! But for those fortunate to be able to get steam engines. Enjoy!
    5 months ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    Being Sociable.
    I have only built static ships /boats so am probably not the best person to comment but one of the main factors that I can see are if you are young and just starting out saving pocket money or older and living on a limited budget. is the cost differential between a basic
    electric
    motor and a basic steam plant I may be wrong just my opinion. Cheers MarkyπŸ‘
    5 months ago by marky
    Forum
    Being Sociable.
    I really can't believe that considering all the members that use this website, that no one is interested in steam engines and what steam has to offer. Why go to all that trouble of adding artificial engine sounds and smokers, when you can have it all and more, by installing a gas boiler and steam engine. When I think of the problems involved to find plans and scratch build a boat, why not go for the authentic look and fit a steam engine. in the fifty years or so I have been involved in this hobby I have NEVER ever installed an
    electric
    motor in a boat. if anyone out there in the ether shares my passion for steam, kindly get in touch, I would appreciate not being completely on my OWN.
    5 months ago by GaryLC
    Forum
    Mtronics W-tail marine mixer connections.
    I have just spent a couple of mins downloading and reading through the manual for your transmitter, Colin and I see you have limited mixing similar to the old Futaba 6A models. if it were me (going back to your original question) I would use this transmitter with a new receiver and fit these into your model and use tank steering as in the 4th diagram on that little image I put on of the
    electric
    al layouts. Very simple and straightforward. I think its channel 2 on your right hand stick used for rudder.
    5 months ago by JOHN
    Directory
    (Other) Lady Marian
    This Drifter was a Marvon Models Kit and was incredible value for the money, a double planked plank on frame hull, and detailed instructions and good quality timber and fittings. As the engine was a four-stroke and silenced, plus the fact it was ticking over at very few revs, it made less noise than your average
    electric
    motor. Plus we were not trying too hard to save the planet in those good old days. (Motor: OS. 6.5cc Marine 4 stroke.) (ESC: servo controlled) (10/10)
    5 months ago by GaryLC
    Forum
    Mtronics W-tail marine mixer connections.
    Well now I'm totally confused. Please Simplify I'm a beginner with the
    electric
    s. Cheers Colin.
    5 months ago by Colin H
    Forum
    Help with vintage rc.
    hi there I am in agreement with DodgyGeezer about the reliability of vintage radio gear. I believe the Digi4 servos were Linear movement, rather than rotary as in modern day servos and yes some of the old versions were 4 wire; with male plugs at the end. One of the main downfalls of these old sets was thing called 'black wire' its where the negative side wire in the
    electric
    al wiring system actually turns black and corrodes. The only way to repair it is to actually renew the wiring and once you have it in one part of your radio system, it inevitably works its way through the whole of your radio system. The transmitters do turn up on that popular auction site. I have often fancied purchasing one just to play around with it - but I wouldn't trust one operating a precious model on the lake, because I can remember the 27 mghz radio gear being very prone to interference from the slightest thing.πŸ‘ john
    5 months ago by JOHN
    Response
    Danish Steam.
    Hello Tica, and very nice to make your acquaintance, and I very much appreciate your comment. I think the two video clips posted are quite incredible, and very much admire the skills of the builders and the finely detailed finish on both boats. I rather wish we had more steam enthusiasts in this country, but I am afraid it is nearly all
    electric
    motors more is the pity. Regards to yourself and Bernhard definitely the king of fine detail. Gary.
    6 months ago by GaryLC
    Forum
    RC steam lever
    Hi Rick, I have just posted a bit of video on here which I found very interesting, mainly due to the fine detail of the two figures in the boat, and the fact they are animated via servos. The stuff in the boat has to be seen to be believed, from a Bulldog to a shotgun and tools and stuff everywhere. Very very realistic, and steam beats
    electric
    motors every time, welcome to the club. Regards, Gary.
    6 months ago by GaryLC
    Forum
    Aeronaut Pilot Boat
    For my next project I am looking at the Pilot Boat by Aeronaut. www.cornwallmodelboats.co.uk/.../Aeronaut-Pilot-Boat-3046-00.htm I am unable to find any reviews or information, apart from the somewhat limited information on the web. I am not new to model boats but I am new to
    electric
    power. It is suggested that two motors are used (not supplied). The kit seems to be very detailed with scope to add. Any advice would be much appreciated. Steve
    3 years ago by cormorant
    Forum
    AIR FOR STEAM
    have a look at DC 12V 2-Position 3-Way Micro Mini
    electric
    Solenoid Valve For Gas Air Pump on that well known selling site
    6 months ago by jacko
    Response
    electric
    Barbarella
    Thank you, Peejay!😁
    6 months ago by Krampus
    Response
    electric
    Barbarella
    She's a beauty!!! (And I am not talking about only the lady in the cockpit!) I grew up a block away from the river, and there were a lot of pleasure craft in the area. Most of them were pre-70's as I left before then.
    6 months ago by Peejay
    Response
    Vintage Model Works 46'' RAF Crash Tender
    Hi Russell I assume that you are referring to bending the stringers and skins? There's no need to be worried, the ply skins respond very well to heating with a hot air gun (
    electric
    paint stripper) and the obeche stringers, if well steamed, bend fairly easily too. Scratch that itch and buy the kit, you won't regret it. Robbob.😁
    6 months ago by robbob
    Response
    electric
    Barbarella
    Thank you!πŸ‘
    6 months ago by Krampus
    Response
    electric
    Barbarella
    Real nice job, like the lit dash, nice touch.
    6 months ago by jbkiwi
    Blog
    boiler and struts
    As this model will be
    electric
    a mock boiler will be put in place for aesthetics as it can be seen clearly if you look directly front on, on the real ship. The struts that come out of the hull are for a extra piece of deck that then connects to the paddle boxes.
    6 months ago by rcmodelboats
    Blog
    Cabin detail part 3 (instrument panels)
    After the Christmas break its back to the cabin to finish some of the instrument detail. You may recall I detailed the cockpit with some ply constructions to represent the general layout; I also intend to detail the compass, throttle controls, steering wheel, panel lighting, and instrument panel. The instrument panel was copied and scaled from various drawing and pictures and I came up with a three-panel unit where panels 1 & 3 are identical as they are for the two-engine managements system the centre panel deals with
    electric
    al things. I intend to make the panel out of 1.5 mm aluminium cut to size on the guillotine I then attached this to a hardwood block with some strong double sided tape this will be more than strong enough to hold the piece for the drilling/light milling operation. I worked out the hole positions using an absolute datum (same as CNC work, if only I was still working) This does take some time using my rather old milling machine making sure any backlash is taken out during the 28 linear movements. I used various sizes of centre drills to produce the holes as they give not only accurate size but also perfectly round holes on thin material and the only ones that needed to be a particular size (6mm dial holes) the others are for switches and LEDs which can all be a 3 mm location hole. Each hole was drilled and then chamfered to simulate a bezel on the dials. Finally, I milled a shallow groove (2mm x 0.3 deep) to simulate the separate panels. I have copied a number of different marine dials from the internet and using PowerPoint I aligned in a complete group and then printed and laminated them, this will be placed behind the aluminium plate using double-sided tape. Having fixed the dials in place I drilled through the holes where LEDSs will fit. The LEDs will be shortened and polished so they are flat to the face; these are then stuck in place. Next, I made all the switches from brass bar with a fine brass pin glued across its face to simulate the lever. These were painted gloss black and the centre pin picked out in red, they were then glued into the 3 mm location hole. The black knobs/pull switches were turned out of black Perspex and polished; they were then glued into the location holes. The whole instrument panel is then pinned on to the wooden framework which has been left in natural wood finish (ply) as it looks like the original boat was just a varnished ply finish.
    6 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Furled sails powered yacht with inboard motor
    Any one with pictures of their Sloop, Yawl, or otherwise where the sailboat is powered by a small
    electric
    motor? The sails furled. My Gypsy did not sail well, but could be modified for power.
    7 months ago by Ron
    Response
    electric
    Barbarella
    Hi Krampus, You did a fantastic job on your model.πŸ‘ She looks very good, Great detail! The Captain better pay attention. Looking at the girl.....πŸ˜‹ Regards, Ed
    7 months ago by figtree7nts
    Media
    electric
    Barbarella
    Ahoy Maties! it's been a long time since my last posting. Happy 2019! I just completed my new scratch-built boat "
    electric
    Barbarella". I tried to recreate (with some liberties) one of my favorite boats of all time, the 30-footer Chris Craft Sportsman built during the 1970s. it measures 24 X 8.5 inches. it is powered with a 9.6 NiMH 4200 mAh battery "nunchuck" pack (like the one used for paintball guns), brushless motor attached to a 30A Mtroniks Hydra controller and a 30mm M4 3-bladed brass propeller. The hull (my own on-the-go design) was made out of Balsa wood which later I fiberglassed. For the superstructure I utilized 2mm ABS plastic sheet material. To my surprise the boat turned to be a very stable and forgiving platform. I really feel a very close connection to this vessel as it is my first own hull design.😁
    7 months ago by Krampus
    Blog
    Crack in seam Repaired!
    Captain's Log: Cracked seam Update! She has been sitting in the Domesticated Test Tank. For 20.0 hours and she is dry as a bone!😁😁😁 Eureka, Tug Brooklyn is now repaired! Now all I have to do. is Spray her bottom! And just a few
    electric
    al repairs. And she'll be ready for her spring Maiden Voyage! Long awaited but, patients is a virtue!πŸ‘
    7 months ago by figtree7nts
    Response
    Internal wiring & bottom skins
    Rob, if all is OK maybe you have proved different to the current thinking, I hope so, because as you know
    electric
    s is complicated enough without having to consider the length of the wire, I'm happy if the bulb lights up, that's an achievement!!
    7 months ago by mturpin013
    Blog
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    After completing the cowl, turned to the rear structure covering the gas turbine and other engine spaces. This can readily be made from styrene sheet. The sides and top were cut out, reinforced with β€œL” shaped angle and fitted together with CA glue. No particular challenges, other than determining where the various section transitions occur. Luckily had two different sets of plans to compare, so the nuances could be established. It was not until the rear structure was fitted into the cowl, the assembly fitted to the removable deck and placed on the hull, realized just how important this milestone was. Once everything is firmly located the accuracy of build becomes readily apparent. Any inaccuracies show up as an obvious misalignment. Was able to check the alignments and squareness using eye, rules, squares and a spirit level and was pleased with the outcome. A subtle sanding of about .020” off the base of one side of the superstructure and everything became square, parallel and correctly aligned. Quite a relief! Have always stressed the importance of accuracy throughout a build. This supported that recommendation. Once the superstructure was completed realized my plan to lift the deck off to gain access to the
    electric
    al control switches was impractical. Have thus cut a small access hole in the rear deck to facilitate access. Still undecided how to best disguise the hole, but at least access is now relatively easy. From now on, until the test program can be continued on the water, will add detail to the model. Doubt there will be much to describe is that of interest, or that has not been covered by others. Will continue this blog once there is anything significant to report. In the meantime, best wishes for Christmas and 2019,
    7 months ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    Outboard Motors
    I have acquired an old 50cm wooden model boat which requires a vintage style
    electric
    outboard motor. I am finding sourcing a motor very difficult. I would welcome advice. I am willing to take a second hand motor if anyone has one.
    7 months ago by BigChris
    Forum
    Modern
    electric
    s
    Hi all, Not been araound for awhile as I have been playing with aircraft as well, I have however found time to scratch build a Fairy Huntsman which I now want to upgrade to modern
    electric
    s, a brushless motor and esc etc, should I avoid lipo's due to the heat issues or can I use them ok. The hull is 42 inches long any suggestions on motor size would be appreciated, also esc size, the boat seems a bi on the heavy side. Any thoughts would be appreciated.
    7 months ago by deltaman
    Forum
    Thunder Tiger Avanti
    Has anyone done any significant modifications to a Thunder Tiger Avanti fast
    electric
    ? I have one and all I have done is to replace the nylon prop with a metal one thus there is very little increase in performance and the reason for doing this was due to the nylon prop throwing a blade after striking an underwater object. Prestwich Model Boats have a suitable replacement motor complete with a better ESC than the existing Ace one and their system can handle up to 4S Lipos instead of the stock set up of 3s . I have located a source of a 4S Lipo which length and width is same as my 3S one but the height is a little more and it will fit into the battery box. To trim it out properly I would have to add some ballast to the starboard side. Due to the
    electric
    s including the battery all being in a small watertight box at the stern there is not a great amount of scope for a lot of mods. Boaty😁
    7 months ago by boaty
    Forum
    My other hobby
    Good to see other PPLs and former PPLs on the Model Boats website. I took mine at Liverpool Airport known now as JLA (John Lennon Airport) in June 1984 and completed it in January 85. Trained with Liverpool Flying School aka Keenair in Cherokee 140s and a PA 38 Tomahawk. Later I moved into Air Nova which was also a Liverpool club and the actor Lewis Collins was also a member of that Club. At the time I was a member of Merseyside IVC (Inter Varsity Club) thus had plenty of passengers. One of them was Victoria Field, my former psychology lecturer who later became famous as a psychologist and writer. Eventually Air Nova moved to Hawarden Airport near Chester but the Club folded shortly after. I then joined the in house Club based at the field and I ceased flying in November 2016. Best flights were going over Snowdon VFR and down the Dee Valley. I also flew over Colwyn Bay to have a look at the boating lake though I haven't sailed there. I also saw the lakes at Llandudno West Shore and LLanfairfechan. The latter I am considering for sailing my fast
    electric
    s. Downside to PPL flying was the crosswind component of the aircraft being 17 knots , At Hawarden there is only one runway the 04/22 and Liverpool the 09/27. I did have to cancel many times due to this. Thankfully sailing model boats is much more enjoyable as we don't have that many snags to deal with and if the motor stops we don't have to do an emergency landing.😎😁😁 Boaty
    8 months ago by boaty
    Forum
    Smoke generator
    Been thinking how I could build a compact sealed
    electric
    smoke generator with a pump to push the smoke through the exhausts, along with the cooling water on my HSL. Are the model train smokers not big enough for your purposes. You could just copy one of those and enlarge it perhaps. From what I remember from my train days they were not too complicated. How about an upside down ic glow plug with a variable voltage regulator in the bottom of a tube with a low temp oil ? You could possibly use a small brushed ESC for the regulator and come up with a controlled drip feed replenishing system. Just seen a site SMOKE EL in Germany which makes smokers for ic and
    electric
    planes but they look expensive and complicated,- work well though,-vids on site.
    8 months ago by jbkiwi
    Directory
    (Racing Boat) Rough Rider
    40" fiberglass Prather hull (1980s). Still have this hull, future twin
    electric
    fit out . (Motor: O/S 45FSR then O\S 45RSR) (5/10)
    8 months ago by jbkiwi
    Blog
    Proboat Sonicwake
    Three weeks ago I got a Proboat Sonicwake deep V fast
    electric
    . This appears to be a replacement for their previous model Vorocity. Very interesting self righting method with a water tank on the port side, slots in the deck and a large exit point at the stern. Idea is that if it capsizes, water will enter through the slots and as it draws the boat under, the air trapped in the hull will self right it. If the boat is stationary in the water, it will list to port due to water entering through the stern outlet and when power is applied it will empty out. Bit scary to watch at first as I thought the boat was on its way to Davy Jones. I use waterproof marine clear tape to seal around the hatch ever time I use it. The quality of the hull raises a few concerns. This relates to its ABS construction as the vast majority of similar boats at that price are made of fibreglass which is much more rigid and would be more suitable for the high speeds. Makers claim it does 50 MPH plus on 6S lipos. The
    electric
    s however are excellent with the exception of the external quality of the Horizon Hobby STX2 TX which looks a bit "toyish". For myself, this is not relevant as I replace all my wheel TXs with the "stick type" and I found that the Futaba T2HR fulfils all requirements and worked well when I sailed the boat. I have not yet changed the stock prop for an Octura one, the latter works great on my Blackjack 29 with a noticeable increase in performance. The motor is a Dynamite Marine W.C brushless 1900 KV with a 120 amp W.C ESC . πŸ˜πŸ˜‹ Boaty.
    8 months ago by boaty
    Response
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Doug, you are probably correct and good thought regarding the polarised caps , but I was just thinking that if the battery input was going through a fuse system as it appears in Rowens photos (difficult to see) it may have caused a slight problem. I have seen mentions of up to 12" between batt and ESC being no problem at lower Amps. You might notice that one of the inputs was from a guy from Castle Creations (USA) which I thought would give a bit of weight to the information. I have always gone with the ESC manufacturers suggestions regarding wire length and have never had a problem in boats or planes (mainly in planes,-18 most 'converted' to
    electric
    from IC -3 capable of pulling 1200W) it's great to be able to chuck ideas and info around, as we can all pick something out of it all which will solve a problem, or perhaps stop us from toasting an electronic component or whatever. BTW, I saw somewhere that extending the wires could cause stuttering and that was one other reason for mentioning the info, as I know Rowen's had a problem with that. I'm sure it will be ok as is,- if its working fine, and it's not going to be run flat out every day it will probably last for years. Probably me thinking on the cautious side as my personal approach to building is to use the K.I.S.S method (may not be the flashest but usually keeps me out of trouble) Regarding the quality of ESCs, you will find that many have the same internal bits just with different cases and colours, (same with chargers) HK is bad for this. Many I have seen use an Atmega chip and you can tell differences by the programming method (some you have to do 1 step and disconnect power before the next step, others just with stick forward center back center etc. Most boards are made in China (Castle Creations and a few others being exceptions) and what you get depends on the quality of assembly/soldering etc in the plant they are made in (if you want to see how many of these items are made in China check out Made in China.com and search ESCs for example. I have cheap ESCs I've used in my planes for years with no probs which look like the HK Red Brick ESCs (except blue) and they are better than the TGY branded ones at 3x the price, and really let the power through !. Even CC have apparently made boards for HK with different cases as have Hobbywing. it's really a case of "you pays ya money and ya takes ya chances". in saying that you are pretty safe with Hobbywing, Tamya, SkyRc, or Castle Creations (USA) but there are other better non China ones around but a a much bigger price. Hope we aren't overloading you Rowen, you might have to get into the 'anti-freeze' to soothe the brain in that cold weather. Another site for you to check out which I have found to be very good, with prices to match HK is RCEcho.com (Hong Kong) Have bought most of my aircraft ESCs from them (around 28 from 30A-120A with no probs)
    8 months ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Hi Rowen, You don't need capacitors at all, and certainly not in series with the wiring. Whereas I can heartily endorse all that jbkiwi says about the possibilities of modern TXs, I've only scratched the surface of what my Spectrum and Turnigy sets can do, I can see no justification for the extra capacitors on ESC leads. The length of the wires inside a typical model can not have a significant effect on the total resistance. Given a typical resistance of 1m of copper wire with ca 1mmΒ² cross sectional area of 0.02Ω (less for larger gauges) it ain't gonna make a happorth of difference whether you have 4" (10cm) or 40". Maybe a little more warmth but the capacitor can't change that. I also can't see where the spikes he mentions should come from. Also bear in mind that the ESC does not apply pure DC to the motor but a pulse train with a pulse repetition rate of around 8 to 10kHz. That's why the motors whistle and scream. Adding capacitors to this could distort the pulses or reduce their peak value. If the ESC is so bad that it produces big spikes when the pulses are switched on or off (which I doubt theses days) then junk it and buy a decent one. On no account fit a capacitor in series with the wiring, unless it is a special Coaxial Capacitor, which are very big and relatively expensive. See pic. I've only seen them on large
    electric
    motors on board ships where the much higher currents and longer cable runs involved than in models may play a role. A very small value capacitor, in the picofarad range might help to short out any potential high frequency RF interference but I've never experienced the need to fit them. in this respect it could be more important that the length of the cable is not close to the wavelengths typically used by RC sets (12.5cm at 2.4GHz) so that it does not act like an antenna. Cheers, Doug 😎 jbkiwi have looked at the link you posted but I'm not convinced considering the small lengths we use in our boats. Yes there will be some overshoot spikes in the pulse train but so severe as to damage anything is in my opinion highly unlikely, given a decent quality ESC in the first place. Something else on that link just occurred to me. There is a pic of what looks like electrolytic (polarised) capacitors between the wires. This is fine for aircraft ESCs which only run forwards, and thus produce positive going pulses. in our boats with reverse the pulse will switch over to negative going. Which after a while could have an explosive effect on the electrolytics. it blows the cans off and produces an interesting snowstorm effect. Good party trick😁 but maybe not so super inside a model boat😑 IF you do fit them to a reversible ESC be sure to use tantalum capacitors which aren't so fussy.
    8 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Proboat UL19
    Just had a new Proboat UL19 Hydroplane delivered. Has anyone had any experience with one. It says 4 to 6S lipo but it mentions not to run flat out all the time on 6S and advises to reduce power in the turn to save the
    electric
    s overheating. Never had this info with my Backjack 29 and new Sonic Wake as both don't overheat when at full throttle. For some reason the UL19 has a larger prop fitted than the two other boats and the Blackjack has an Octura prop which I got from Prestwich Model Boats and goes very well. The motor in the UL19 is the same as the one in the Blackjack. My theory is that as the UL19 is a hydroplane which when set up is heavier at the bow and will need an extra burst of power to get it up on the plane. Boaty😁
    8 months ago by boaty
    Blog
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Finally the new brass propellers arrived, delayed about a month in one of Canada's regular postal disruptions. After minor modifications to the boss profile (the brass are more streamlined and thus longer than nylon) to give clearance with the rudder leading edges, they were easily installed. Could now refit the
    electric
    al equipment previously removed to get access to the shaft couplings. Inevitably took the opportunity to make β€œimprovements”, so then could not get anything to work! After much frustration determined the problem was not from my improvements, but from the cheap and nasty slide switches provided with ESCs. These must have got damp during the test runs and corroded internally. Suggest when using these switches they be consigned to the garbage and replaced with proper toggle ones. Had decided to use the centre brushed motor/propeller for manoeuvring and low speed operation and then the outer brushless for high speed. Brushless ESCs do not modulate smoothly and motor operation is erratic. This was particularly evident when going from forward to reverse and vice versa. Using a lever control Tx, it was also easy to inadvertently operate the brushless control along with the brushed making the model response unpredictable. After some thinking, decided to insert a small relay into each of the white signal wires for the brushless motor ESCs. These relays would be controlled by a RC switch operated by another channel on the Rx. Hoping this way the brushless motors could be switched on and off whenever desired. The two relays would retain the ESCs as separate circuits and avoid any interference between them. The idea worked, can now operate the brushed motor confidently knowing the brushless will not be inadvertently triggered. This means low speed manoeuvers can be gently undertaken using the modulation and control ability of the brushless motors and, by selecting the auxiliary control, can add the high speed capability of the brushless. Am also hoping that when the Li-Pos trigger the low voltage cut-outs in the ESCs, this will retain a β€œget-home” facility on the brushed motor as that ESC operates independently. Much to look forward to when next on the water.
    8 months ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    All hooked up, nowt happens...
    You're as BAD as me Boaty πŸ˜‰ but I had a Rover 2000 with fully reclining seats back then - no problem 😁 Re 3 wires on a brushless. Simply put, this is analogous to a 3 phase AC motor (such as used in bathroom extractor fans etc). If you apply a single phase AC voltage to an AC motor it just twitches backwards and forwards in the same place as the voltage crosses from the positive to the negative half cycle. Thus 3 phases are applied giving 3 'shoves' in sequence to keep things moving. A starter capacitor is also needed to give the motor a 'belt' to shove it off. Similarly with a brushless: the ESC senses where the motor armature is in relation to the magnet poles and applies a DC pulse to the next armature coil in sequence. When you shove the throttle up the pulse width lengthens applying a longer shove and thus more energy and speed. Pulling the throttle back with a reversible ESC just turns the pulse train upside down so that negative DC pulses are applied to the motor, reversing the magnetic field created in the armature and thus the rotation. Simple really. It's the sensing and timing done inside the ESC that's the tricky bit, which is why we had to wait about a hundred years from the invention of the AC motor (Nikolai Tesla) until we could use them in models - thanks to micro-electronics. Here endeth today's seminar 😁😁 Happy brushlessing Folks, cheers, Doug 😎 Hmmm, perhaps that's why
    electric
    toothbrushes use brushed motors! 😁😜
    8 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    All hooked up, nowt happens...
    Hi Westquay It sounds Doug has got it right. I only went over to brushless 3 years ago when I returned to fast
    electric
    . All my existing models at the time had brushed motors installed and I did become confused with the "new technology". Having three wires from the motor to the ESC was a bit difficult to comprehend but as the boat was an RTR it was helpful due to having an instruction manual with it. It just takes time and experience to get use to such changes but it will be right in the end. My only experience of a non starter was back in 1976, this being the only time I had a date with a married woman. I had a Lotus Elan then and there was no room in the back and it would have been a waste of time calling the AA to resolve it.😁😎 Boaty
    8 months ago by boaty
    Directory
    (Working Vessel) Formidable
    Hemmens 'Formidable' 5 years to make! Double plank on frame. First plank skin fastened with wood trenails. Scale planking. Second skin mahogany strip to Lloyds spec. 10,00 copper rivets. Was intended for Hemmens V-4 steam but chickened out so
    electric
    - V-4 now bench run only. (9/10)
    8 months ago by humelvin
    Forum
    All hooked up, nowt happens...
    Doug, just managed to download the PDF. I hadn't noticed the download sign and it just put up a bigger PDF picture. BUT...what the hell all that stuff means I have no idea. 1 Beep, 2 Beeps, 3 beeps. My motor just beeped continually. And no, I didn't know the Tx had to go on first either. it's been a LONG time since I played with RC gear of any sort and that was much simpler than all this modern stuff. I've put it all away now, so I'll have another go during the week and see if I can get any sense from it. I can't ask any locals as they're all old tuggers with basic
    electric
    ks. Cheers, Martin
    8 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    All hooked up, nowt happens...
    Thanks Doug, all this
    electric
    kery baffles me but I have managed to pass the first hurdle, soldering the EC5 cannectors to the power leads! I'll post as things progress. Selwyn
    8 months ago by rapidair65
    Forum
    All hooked up, nowt happens...
    I can only sympathise, I have had these lecky problems since I started building some time back. My solution was to find a friendly "
    electric
    savvy" builder to help me out by wiring one of my boats for me, I now have a system I Can use as a pattern.πŸ‘
    8 months ago by Lordgord
    Directory
    (Yacht) fair wind
    kyosho fair wind yacht .This is getting on for twenty years old,it is a big yacht wth a main mast and sails that is over 4 feet high.The
    electric
    s are futaba and it has two servos fitted one for the rudder and the other is for the sails.The hull is Abs with the mast and booms made from aluminum.I purchased this in a poor state with problem
    electric
    s and in need of tlc. (8/10)
    8 months ago by keithtindley
    Media
    kyosho fair wind
    This yacht was purchased on a whim ? i spotted it for sail locally and thought it was about 30 inches high. i had a shock on collection as its over 40 inches high and 3foot long.lt needed some attention to the
    electric
    s and transmitter and a lot of tlc. i think its big enough for my jack russell to curcumnavigate the world single footed !
    8 months ago by keithtindley


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