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    Response
    Re: Forecastle Bulwarks and Hull Fittings
    The rigoles came as complete portholes in the white metal fittings. However, many years ago I built one of Deans Marine kits, HMS Verulam, a 1/96 scale destroyer. Included in the kit were lengths of thin plastic sprue with the instruction to wind the sprue tightly around a
    pencil
    . Remove the resulting 'sprue coil' from the
    pencil
    and cut it lengthways with a small pair of scissors. The semi circular pieces created by the cutting made quite acceptable rigoles. Steve
    10 months ago by cormorant
    Response
    Re: a few computer problems, but back on!
    I've found a
    pencil
    or felt tip does the job as well Ed! Then follow the line with a razor saw or the trusty Dremel ๐Ÿ˜‰ ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    10 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    This is all above me I just use paper and
    pencil
    . If it doesn't work out then rub it out and redraw LOL! Martin555.
    1 year ago by Martin555
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    I use a VERY old copy of Ashlar-Vellum's DrawingBoard. It's no longer current - it ran on W95, and worked up to XP. Their current products are Graphite, Cobalt and Xenon. This package has an interface designed by two people from the Xerox PARC research centre, where they developed the ideas of a mouse and windows which we use today. It is completely intuitive, and you need no training whatsoever to use it - it's just like sketching with a
    pencil
    on a pad. Unfortunately, they maintain patents on the interface, which is probably why other products are more clumsy, and they sell to the professional market. Their cheapest package starts at ยฃ1.5k, so I'm not suggesting that anyone use it. But if anyone is in the market for a commercial high-end CAD package I would recommend that they take a look at that company...
    1 year ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    Hi DG, The CAD program that I have been messing with is Designspark. I gave up it is easier and quicker for me to use paper and
    pencil
    , at least I don't lose my temper with that. Martin555.
    1 year ago by Martin555
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    Hi Martin 555 - think DG is the best person to answer your query - he has built many more EeZeBilts than I have. For my sons ones, simply used polyurethane paint on the hull as for full size dinghy's . Cant remember what for the superstructure - but did use satin type of varnish still available here for the
    pencil
    lined decks. Long ago (in the eighties) and memory not good in parts like the curates egg.............. The two finished modern ones are polyester coated - varnished inside only on the enclosed bits. Humbrol matt enamel to finish as it was on hand , sprayed clear satin varnish cover.
    1 year ago by redpmg
    Forum
    Boat retrieval
    If you use the US favoured closed face reel type its very easy to place a small lightweight "sinker" accurately (ie: a rubber off a
    pencil
    or one can use a medium hook with a piece of an artificial worm) which does not do much harm to any sized boat . Takes very light line and a small rod to cast at least 30ft with one - even light line can haul in a big boat.
    1 year ago by redpmg
    Blog
    40'' Seaplane Tender, new build L
    Bit more progress, bit slow as I had to have a change and 3/4 finish some 1/2 finished jobs on the house). I've fitted the toe rails, glued on the cabin roofs, made the floors, (both 2pc so as to be easy to remove to get at the bilges,) made the shaft support blocks, milled out the shaft slots and slotted the hull to match, ( still have to epoxy blocks in when happy with shaft angles ), made the motor mount plate and trimmed the inside edge excess off the deck. Still have to make the rear cockpit floor and rear cabin /door panel but I'll wait till I've fitted the motors, as I have to see where the engine boxes end up, (they will probably end up being in the correct place with the motors partly inside the cabin but if I'm clever enough it won't be noticed. The odd pic out is of some of the tools we use to make our models and don't even think about. I know most of us have our special home made 'tools' for different little jobs (ie sandpaper glued to flat or shaped blocks etc) but I thought for anyone just starting, it might give them an idea of what they could need to make it easier to build a model. Obviously there are fillers, paints, brushes, planes, drills etc (couldn't fit my mill on the table, weighs about 400lbs) and a number of other items for doing the larger bits. Mostly it's some of the simple smaller tools which are the handiest (assortment of modelling knives, small hacksaw, cutting board,
    pencil
    s and sanding blocks/paper. If you are fortunate enough to have a lathe you will obviously save a lot of money on scale fittings, shafts etc, but most people don't have one and have to come up with other methods or $$.
    1 year ago by jbkiwi
    Blog
    Fitting shafts and motors
    I have spent the last couple of sessions preparing and fitting the prop shafts, mounts and pump plate. First was to prepare the wood profiles, paint with sanding sealer and then prime them. They look a lot neater sprayed grey than just plain ply wood. I checked the two motors and found that the suppressor was not of the correct value. I removed it and replaced with the normal 47nf capacitor across the terminals and 10nf from each terminal to the casing. I then connected the wires to the terminals. I built the assemblies, fitted the motors and placed then in the hull. I then inserted the shafts and connected them to the motors via solid connectors. I prefer solid drive connectors where possible as I believe this should reduce vibration which is often introduced through universal joints. When I was happy with the alignment, I glued the shafts in place with Acrylate. I then fitted and glued the water intake pipe also with Acrylate. Next came the pump plate. This plate also has the rudder servo secured to it. After assembly, this was also glued to the hull. Next job was to fit the rear deck support and the bead on the outside which will eventually hold the rubber fender strip. The
    pencil
    taped to the flat stick at a distance of 12mm was used to mark the outside of the hull similar to marking the deck support line before. It was now time to prepare the two deck levels. Strengthening braces of ply wood were fitted all around. This has resulted in quite a strong unit. The instructions say that the fitting of the decks is next. I think they have forgotten all of the working features of this build. If the decks are glued now, there is no room for fitting in all of the gadgets. I will wait until I know what is required. Next time I will start the preparation of the cabin. This part contains most of the fire monitor servos and piping, radar and search lights plus general lighting. Very busy.
    1 year ago by MouldBuilder
    Blog
    Fitting the Rudders
    There are four rudders on this boat. The design for these is a vast improvement on the Aeronauts Pilot Boat I recently completed. The first stage was to drill all of the required holes in the hull. These include two for the anchors, two for the prop shafts, one for the water inlet tube and four for the rudders. As this is an ABS hull moulding, drilling is not usually too much of a problem but due to the cost of the model, I decided to protect the insides around the holes with tape to decrease the possibility of cracking. I start the holes off with a 3mm drill and then increase to the final size which in this case was 4mm, 6mm, 7mm and 4mm respectively. I gently filed around the holes to get a nice slide fit and correct alignment of the tubes. The deck lies on a support rib which will later be glued around the inside of the hull. The instructions highlight the build of a simple device which will hold a
    pencil
    at a height of 7.5mm. A
    pencil
    is taped to a straight piece of wood of about 30cm long with a suitable spacer in between which was 3mm in this case. You can then place the stick to contact both sides of the hull and then draw a constant line at exactly 7.5mm down. Simple but effective. This will form the height guide for the deck support. This line was also continued around the bow of the ship which will form the bulwark later. The next job was to prepare and glue the side supports inside the hull for the rudder tube support board. Next job was to glue the support board in place. I did not notice at this time that the support board had quite a bad bend in it. The bow was upwards which resulted in the two centre tube alignment inserts being above the end of the tubes. The solution was to glue the two middle alignment inserts under the support board instead. A little awkward but the result is good. The rudder tubes were now fitted and glued to be water tight with Stabilit Express glue. This is good for water tightness. I painted the four rudders matt black and then protected with Lacquer. Although the instructions state that the rudders should be fitted and set up at this stage, I have decided to leave this for as long as possible to avoid damage. The next job is to fit the twin motors and prop shafts. This is a job for next week.
    1 year ago by MouldBuilder
    Forum
    Hints and Tips.
    Hi Guys, A little inexpensive tip for marking water lines on your models. Just use a clothes peg,
    pencil
    ,and a couple of elastic bands.
    1 year ago by Martin555


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