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    Blog
    36'' Thames River Police Launch by Robbob
    After the successful build of the β€˜Vintage Model Works’ RAF Crash Rescue Tender I was asked by Mike Cummings of VMW if I would undertake to build a prototype of their new model with the aim of checking the construction method and the assembly instructions for accuracy before the kit is put into production. The model is a β€˜Thames River Police Launch’ and is based on the original design by Phil Smith for the Veron company, this was a very popular model kit in the late 50’s and 60’s and sold for the princely sum of 43 shillings and tuppence, approximately Β£2.15 in today’s money but an equivalent cost of Β£48.50 in 1960. This design has been updated to accommodate electric propulsion and radio control by Colin Smith, the son of the original designer and it has been re-scaled to be 36” in length where the original was 24” which gives much more scope for detailing and provides more β€˜hiding room’ for the drive, control systems and all the associated wiring. The kit produced by VMW uses the same construction techniques as the original and the materials are a combination of balsa and
    plywood
    both of which a laser and CNC cut for precision. The ply and balsa materials supplied are of very high quality as one would expect from VMW and all the stripwood for the chines, rubbing strakes and deck detailing is included, even the dowel required for the mast is in the box, very comprehensive! The kit also includes white metal fittings such as the fairleads and stanchions, and the searchlight and horns. The glazing for the windows comes in the kit too. The instruction sheet supplied is in need of revision as it is largely taken directly from the original as written by Phil Smith and some of the terminology needs updating, for instance the ply bottom and side skins are referred to as β€˜strakes’ but I understand that a re-write of the instructions is in hand along with an updated plan showing the best positioning for the motor, prop-shaft, battery, ESC, receiver, rudder and servo. During construction I have added a few additional pieces of ply or balsa as reinforcement or supports and substituted some balsa parts for ply where I thought a stronger material would be better. I also added some hatches to give access to the wiring at the bow and the rudder & servo at the stern but largely I have not gone β€˜off plan’ to any extent. The pictures show the model in it’s present state (Nov 2018) and is ready for painting and finishing.
    10 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    46'' RAF Crash Tender
    I am reminded of the 1/72nd Revell Flower class corvette model. That had a steel plate deck, with non-slip walkways and some small planked areas at the bow and amidships. But the model has the deck completely covered in moulded-in raised planking lines, and if you want a more accurate model you have to sand or scape these away... My own EeZeBilt PT Boat had a stained and drawn planked deck, because I thought that looked pretty. But in reality the originals had
    plywood
    sheet decks which were painted. I think a few of the ELCO 80ft prototypes may have had planks - but they were all initially delivered painted grey, so you would never have seen them. They just look better with wood planking, don't they...? "....I have been told that when the boat was commissioned into service all the superstructure was painted white ~ I see the majority of other models grey with white roof......." I think that all service craft have a delivery specification paint job, which would act as an 'undercoat' and then they have other paint jobs specified for different theatres, and maybe even different tasks. These paint jobs may change rapidly - particularly where camouflage or FoF recognition is involved. So if you want to be accurate, you need to look up a date and a location and find the official specification for that craft at that time. Luckily, I think that that Crash Tender had a short career on the South Coast, and probably only ever sported one official pattern.
    3 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Directory
    (Working Vessel) Northlight Clyde Puffer
    The Clyde Puffer is a Caldercraft kit of 1:32 scale. it is a representative model of a typical small coaster from the Western isles of Scotland, known to many ship lovers as a 'Clyde Puffer'. it has a GRP hull which has full external detail, riveting, strakes etc. and a
    plywood
    superstructure and decking plus over 200 white metal fittings. As usual for Caldercraft you need to have your thinking cap on as the A0 plan and the 'instruction book' do not match up but of course they do expect you to have a little bit of experience in model building. it has taken me about 6 months to build, but working on and off over this time. it has a large hull which is easy to house the motor, ESC, RC and batteries, etc. (I installed 2 lead acid 6 volt batteries, one on each side amidships) which gives stability and ballast. Being a large deep hull it needs a lot of ballast, even in its short length. I have only tested her in the big white test tank at home so do not know how it will perform on our lake. I have sailed her many times on our lake and she certainly sails well. I installed an electronic switch for the navigation lights and gives a good effect during the darker afternoons/evening. (Motor: MFA) (ESC: Viper Marine 15) (9/10)
    3 years ago by ads90
    Blog
    Keel
    Printed out the frames /ribs drawings and outlined each in orange so I could easily see the correct lines. Cut those out and pasted to some
    plywood
    . The
    plywood
    is Baltic Birch 1/4" -5 ply, very nice quality that I get from a local woodworking supply store. it's a bit nicer than from the local warehouse hardware lumber yard, but that would work also. Used some spray rubber cement, sprayed only the paper back and stuck on the
    plywood
    . Spraying just one surface allows quick removal of the paper once cut. I don't have a bandsaw of scroll saw, so I use a sabresaw/hand jigsaw mounted upside down on a surface that secures to my drill press. Works pretty good. My shop is so tiny that I just don't have a space for larger tools. Maybe someday. Keel board was glued up, will show more tomorrow on that. Joe
    8 months ago by Joe727
    Response
    Sports cruiser ''ALI''
    I know what you say about CA glue with
    plywood
    , but once you have put the CA glue on I found a quick squirt of CA accelerator set's the glue quicker and works better for
    plywood
    . Have you given that a try? I After the first application of Ca and a squirt I then gave it a second smaller drip of glue and another squirt. it worked well for me.
    8 months ago by BOATSHED
    Forum
    Fairmile D 1/24 Scale Build
    Sakibian, My friend Graham built his E-boat with a fibreglass hull but scratch-built everything else. He does magnificent detail work. For you to build this hull you first need to get the plans to the scale you want to build. 1/24 is good for these models. The cross sections are essential. You need to determine how many bulkhead frames you will require. You won't require as many as shown on their plan and photos - maybe less than half - as many as will enable you to support the stringers to give you a shape of the hull on to which you can fix the planking or skin. The frames you choose need to be at or very close to cross sections, so you can use them to mark and cut your frames. I use 5mm
    plywood
    . There is a photo of my Fairmile D frame earlier in this series of posts. One of my earliest posts on this website was a Youtube video with the E-boat and my Fairmile D in action with sound effects.
    8 months ago by reilly4
    Forum
    Fairmile D 1/24 Scale Build
    Hi Sakibian, The PT boat site now sells stuff too, but was originally a site where the author John Drain described how he was building his PT boat and then the E-boat. There are good plans and examples of how he has constructed these boats. My Fairmile D was made from
    plywood
    frames, pine stringers, planked and skinned with balsa and then fibreglassed. it was a very interesting and difficult shape, but very satisfying once completed. it sails beautifully in the most difficult conditions. I have also included a few more pics of my friend's E-boat with the newer camouflage for further inspiration.
    8 months ago by reilly4
    Response
    Fitting the side skins.
    Robbob, Looking back again on some of your earlier posts, I see the
    plywood
    skinning that you did. I will be doing this on a future build as I am not the best at planking a hull. Your reference to HEATING THE
    plywood
    is a great tip, I have never tried that. Thanks, Joe
    9 months ago by Joe727
    Response
    Crack in seam Repaired!
    Ed, I have the plastic hull. I used a strip of fiberglass per instructions and never have had a leak issue. At the time I did this, about 4 years ago, I was doing a lot of fiberglass work so I had the proper supplies. Adheres to plastic hull well. My current build is a Springer Tug Rescue Vessel, I am hoping to get the
    plywood
    hull sealed only with paint. We will see... Joe
    9 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Deck, servo mount
    Put together a pilot house based on some tugs I've seen. Just freelanced it as I went. I build a lot with styrene so I am used to just cutting and building. I use liquid styrene cement that fuses the materials together. See photo, will trim it out as I mount it, need to add some detail at roof and some Navigational lighting. Put on on 3mm
    plywood
    deck, same as hull bottom. The deck is also curved (proper term is SHEAR) and I started to build up some wood edge at the opening. Will sand everything well, then start sealing and priming all surfaces. Made a bracket for the rudder servo mount and an adjacent platform for the ESC and RX. Ordered two 6v 5ah SLA batteries. I will wire in parallel to stay with 6v and get 10ah. I like to stay with 6 volts as I want the motor to run slow like a tug should. Will wire in an in-line fuse. Haven't decided where I will put switch, up high somewhere to avoid water. I will show the wiring once I get to it. This build is going fast because it's a simple design, just what I was looking for. I work on it late afternoons and into the evening while I watch basketball games. About 4 hrs a day. Looking forward to building the hatch and getting some primer started tomorrow. Regards, Joe πŸ‘
    9 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Moving along
    Merry Christmas to All! Yesterday I made a brass strap to secure the motor, then aligned the drive shaft and stuffing tube. Tacked tube in place with a gel superglue, will be covered with epoxy later. Used a short piece of aluminum tube to help align the motor and shaft. A coupler will be placed here. Cut some
    plywood
    pieces to create keel at the shaft tube. White stuff is marine epoxy by locktite, just enough to set everything. I will then coat and finish this assembly. Finished the day's work by constructing a rudder, no photo yet. Enjoy Christmas! Joe
    9 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Day Three
    Hi, Using 3mm Baltic birch
    plywood
    , I skinned the hull. Used Titebond III wood glue, bent by hand, drilled and tacked in place with small brads. I cut the bottom oversized so it was easier to position, after drying 16 hours I cut the edges flush with the sides using a Japanese pull saw. Built the core for my rudder, see photos, solder my own arm as I did not have one. Used a 3/16" set collar, filed the surface to expose brass and solder a piece brass. Will drill the second hole later. Attached brass plate that will be inside the actual rudder, will build from either plastic or wood. Next, laid out the placement of the stuffing tube, then drilled the hull then I built a motor mount from wood and added some green foam to limit mount vibration and sound transfer. Set the rudder post and block. Time to let everything overnight. Joe
    9 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Day Two Springer
    Springer build log for website Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe Day 2 Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch
    plywood
    from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade drill press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. if you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic, woodworking, etc., a good practice is to use this both adhesive and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate adhesive. Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe
    9 months ago by Joe727
    Response
    Rescue Vessel - Springer Tug
    Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch
    plywood
    from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade drill press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. if you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic, woodworking, etc., a good practice is to use this both adhesive and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate adhesive. Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe
    9 months ago by Joe727
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    The bend was done using a "jig" and two strips of a thin
    plywood
    as a protection of the planks (nor to distort them by clamps as it happened for the first time). First, I cooked them a little, of course. When dried, they kept the shape nicely. For caulking, the epoxy (or aliphatic wood glue) could be "injected" into the gaps left between the planks. I have tried all three methods (black paper, epoxy and aliphatic glue) and went for paper, at the end.
    9 months ago by Zdenek
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    I found the pencil did not give enough definition to the plank join. A fine fibre tip pen produced a good line but the ink still tried to chase the grain of the wood. I managed to smudge a couple of lines before they had dried. But finally, the grain of the
    plywood
    looked 'wrong' on the planks which would not be too bad down the side of the cabin but the foredeck planks will have a quite significant curve and a large surface area to see how 'wrong' the grain is. I have a wallpaper steamer somewhere in the garage so modifying that will be the next job. Steve
    9 months ago by steve-d
    Forum
    steam water pump
    You don't need to buy a water tank, simply build one into your hull using
    plywood
    and fibre-glass, the favourite is the sharp end simply fit a wooden bulk-head and cover it in fibre-glass.
    9 months ago by GaryLC
    Blog
    Vintage style yacht designed by ''Vic Smeed''
    Any one interested in buying my Yacht ? ''Starlet'' Vintage style yacht designed by "Vic Smeed" all
    plywood
    construction, 11" beam x34" length, sail area 465 Sq inches. Complete with heavy duty sail arm large servo and rudder servo installed. Good sails although slightly marked and rigging. Install a receiver ready to sail.Β£135 Best if collected in person. Located in West Surrey.
    10 months ago by lhpen
    Forum
    Pretend deck planking
    Hello from Australia, First start off with a scrap piece of
    plywood
    the same as you intend to use for the deck. Work out the width of the planks and score lightly with a scriber (not to deep). Using a ruler or suitable guide ,mark the lines with a no 3 fine tipped marker pen. wait till dry(usually 24hours to stop bleeding) then either spray or paint on satin laquer. (3coats). Always works for me. Good luck. Sid
    11 months ago by sidley70
    Response
    Cast keel bulb
    No mounting points yet. I thought I was pushing my luck trying to DIY mould 6.5Kg of lead without making things worse with fixings. Plan is that the fin will be between 12 and 30mm thick with a 10mm
    plywood
    core which I will set into the lead. Then an 8mm diameter carbon rod right up into the hull finishing above the waterline and two M6 stainless steel studs to hold the keel on. One of those studs will pass right through the lead. There will not be space for the second stud to do the same.
    11 months ago by steve-d
    Forum
    EarlyVosper M.T.B by Simplas
    Found on E Bay but sold in June of this year, a 42 inch kit of a Simplas Marine Construction Vosper M.T.B. It would appear that there are not many about now. I built one in 1972 and the kit contained a fibreglass hull with all fittings including the guns being in cast metal. Deck and superstructure were
    plywood
    and the boat was a model of an early Vosper as it had a very narrow beam and torpedo tubes were towards the stern. I fitted a DC Sabre 1.5cc diesel but had to add a lot of ballast which resulted in a sharp drop in performance. This was solved by replacing the Sabre with a Fuji 15 marine version glowplug engine . The boat was free running and as I was on an apprentice engineers pay and could not afford r.c.as I was having to support an ageing Mini. This was my transport from Ellesmere Port to the boating lake in New Brighton. If I had bought a Taycol Supermarine motor it would have solved all my problems as the battery would have been the ballast. Boaty 😁
    12 months ago by boaty
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    Hi Martin, ALL Dumbphones and PCs (or better said the browser used on the PC) have these irritating auto correct / auto type functions. BUT they can always be switched OFF. Just look in the [Settings] of your web browser. Cheers, Doug 😎
    12 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    Hi. what is the best way to bend thin ply 2.5mm to form a curved hatch cover ? Thanks Dave
    12 months ago by Gardener
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    A hair dryer/heat gun played on one side of the ply while bending it to the hot side. bend it a little more than needed and hold in that position or strap it in position round a tin till cool. Oh yes wear gloves to save your fingers.πŸ‘ Or get some flexi ply. it is made easily bendable in one direction. Can be rolled very tightly. used in cabinetry in kitchens etc for boxing in curves.πŸ‘
    12 months ago by onetenor
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    666 is the Devil's number! Draw your own conclusions folks 😁 Martin, every time you post something that number will increment, Cheers, Doug 😎
    12 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    If 666 is the number of the Beast, is 668 the neighbour of the Beast?
    12 months ago by terrymiff
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    When I typed that, the little thing on the left said Forum posts: 666, but it no longer does, oddly. People have this thing about the number. And I would say the doctors use the machine that most reliably runs the NHS programme they all use. They have updated the appointments system (with no obvious improvements), but the normal medical files aspect always seems to work very well and they are very good at reminders, etc. compared with my last surgery. Martin
    12 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    That's what i was wondering Mike 😲
    12 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    Martin, what's the significance of 666 posts? PS. I'm glad I don't use your health centre sounds as if they behind the times, are you sure your well?
    12 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    666 posts, but fear not, recent research has shown that the number was actually more likely 616, which is long gone. Martin
    12 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    Did I say it was green? I wondered what it meant as it appeared on its own. I don't do emoticons, I think they're corny. My "steam" computer is the same as those in my Health centre's consultation rooms, but with a more usable graphics card.....he said like he'd know it from a hole in the arse! I don't possess a mobile' phone, which is why you can usually understand what I type as no mad auto type thing is trying to take over as it does with Klevafones acting as computers. Martin
    12 months ago by Westquay
    Blog
    Life Rings
    The white metal fittings supplied with the kit are somewhat lacking in detail and some are overweight to say the least. I decided to produce some life rings to my specification I had tried to find suitable replacements on the web without success. So how to produce the ring part. I first tried with
    plywood
    but the finish achievable was not acceptable (can be seen in the pictures) so I then decided to use Bamboo (Ikea phone stand) for those who have followed from the start the same material as the grating on the foam tanks. First I cut some rough circles out of 10mm bamboo sheet and drilled a 10mm hole so it can be mounted on a 10mm screw mandrel. This allows the piece to machined on one side and then reversed and machined on the other side. The tool I used was ground with a 22 mm radius to produce the shape on one side of the ring and then when reversed and machined again the tool actually β€œparts off” the ring on the inner diameter leaving the ring free on the now remaining peg, the finish on the bamboo was good enough without any further sanding. The next step was to put a slot in the OD at 90degree intervals to hold the β€œrope” in position while the rope is bound in four places. The easiest way was to make a jig to hold the ring and to keep the rope in place while it’s glued into ring, it can then be removed and bound in four places each turn being super glued to keep it in place. Next job is to give a coat of sanding sealer that stiffens the rope and seals the wood. The rings are theoretically held to the cabin roof with clamp type brackets so again to ensure consistency I machined a piece with a suitable profile. I then cut radial slices to create individual brackets. The rings will actually be fastened to the cabin roof with 2 x 8BA bolts this is to enable them to be removed for painting of both the ring and the roof. At a later painting stage, I will be giving them two coats of grey primer and three coats of white, then hand painting the rope loops with red paint. The finished rings are much lighter and hopefully look more realistic.
    12 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    Hi Mike, Suspect that Martin's steam powered computer can't display the thumbs up, so it shows a default square instead. Where the 'green' came from I've no idea! Cheers, Doug 😎
    12 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    What green square?πŸ‘
    12 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    Thanks don’t know about green square.
    12 months ago by Gardener
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    I see no real difference. You go over, I go inside. Water is the really important thing and hot or cold makes no odds. As I've been doing this during this year's strong sun, the water in the ply gets hot anyway. I also only dip it in once and then slam it in the tin. I have never found the need to soak it for ages. Of course it won't hurt it, just not really necessary. 3" thick x 10" wide oak, however, needs up to 5 hours in a steam chest. And you get exactly 7 minutes before it goes rigid again. Ask me how I know Gardener, what is that little square supposed to mean? I haven't even got one on my keyboard. Martin
    12 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    πŸ‘
    12 months ago by Gardener
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    Slightly more comfortable - The bending is done simply by soaking in hot water for 10 - 15 mins and then forming around a suitable paint tin/circular object and left a couple of days to dry. The skins must be absolutely dry before fitting as further drying out when glued to the bulkheads will twist the whole hull.
    12 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    Gardener, I go out in the garden, where I have some large ex paint tins. I soak the ply in the water butt, then wedge it against the inside of the tin with a stick of bamboo, until the sun has dried it. By then it's nicely curved and can be glued to your frame members, you made while it was drying, out of 3mm ply. Make sure the top really IS dry and then weight down the structure while the glue is setting thoroughly. I've just made a long section of deck/hatch for my Chris Craft version of a Sea Hornet that way. Cheers, Martin
    12 months ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Bending thin
    plywood
    πŸ‘
    12 months ago by Gardener
    Forum
    So, why not woodies?...
    A valid point, Brian, but many woodies were painted. Chris-Craft red and whites for instance. But veneers can be used for the "planks" over
    plywood
    shapes. That's how I made my Riva models. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Response
    The Saga of the Cabin Roof or - Arrrgh!
    Did you mean me John? Or Mike? I had considered planking but my mahogany planks are very very thin about 0.5mm x 5mm wide, and I would still have had the problem of 'warping on' a
    plywood
    base skin. So I persevered with the mahogany veneer and I'm happy now with the result of making it in two pieces. matching the edges for the centre line joint took the most time πŸ€” More power to your plank cutters GentsπŸ‘
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Media
    Dumas USS Crockett
    Asheville Class gun boat model is 51” long weighs 22 lbs. hull covered with 2 layers of 2 oz. fiberglass cloth and resin. All
    plywood
    and balsa construction finished with fiberglass resin and Model Master paints. Working radar mast, turrets, desiel sound, whopper sound, general quarters sound, sierene. Power is MACK Drives 12 volt system 2 x 2 6volt 3000 nimh each drive. Very fast in the water.
    1 year ago by Mikep
    Blog
    Part1 research information
    Deck From the construction hand book:- Decking shall be single layer of mahogany
    plywood
    , approximately 9/16 inch thick, installed in general accordance with plan, BuShips No. PT486-S1106-411193, subject to development of satisfactory material. Note. I have seen photos of some perhaps later ELCO 80s with planked decks. Planking 62 degrees hull planking angle not 45 degrees as many have used. stern transom at 12 degree angle approximately. Prop shafts of real boat. All three propellers turned in the same direction clockwise looking from rear, not the greatest configuration for a model boat. propshaft angles are around 10 degrees. The centre shaft is at a larger angle to the side ones. The centre prop shaft angle is 11 degrees and the wing prop shafts are 9 degrees. Using these angles may restrict your propeller selection. The centre shaft appears from hull further aft than the side shafts but the propellers are all at the same distance from the stern or transom.
    1 year ago by CB90
    Forum
    SuzyQ
    Hi Guys If you use Hobbyking 3648-1450kv 35mm brushless on a 4S 5800mah Lipo, 100Amp ESC and a 2 blade 40mm prop it will go like the clappers !!! You would have to make it from
    plywood
    to take 1600Watts(about 2HP @ 21,000 rpm(unloaded)!!! Canabus
    1 year ago by canabus
    Forum
    SuzyQ
    Hello from Australia I built it years ago and converted it to a Skidoo. Went like the clappers. Build it out of Balsa not
    plywood
    as the
    plywood
    makes it a bit heavy and you need a gutsy motor to push it along. Regards Sid
    1 year ago by sidley70
    Forum
    Inspiration for beautiful boat builders ;-)
    Mike, to me scratch building is just that. You start with bugger all and end up with a model boat. if you start with a kit, you're kit building and if you have to modify it to correct it you're kit-bashing. All perfectly valid, especially if you are using scratchbuilding skills to make a good job of a kit, as I had to do when a client asked me to make up an Amati Riva kit. Biggest pile of crap I ever opened the lid on. Having already built two Rivas from a pile of
    plywood
    , a plank of pear and a set of stolen Riva works drawings I was able to kit-bash the garbage into something I could deliver, but never again! I wouldn't know how to share plans, but have em all here if you can inform me how. I have Gary Griswold plans...useful, but crap. You will be correcting the build as you go along, but it's no big deal, just time consuming and a bloody nuisance! I have also a pile (roll) of drawings from The Rudder magazine, an American publication from the 20s. These are of real craft, not models, but that's irrelevant, really, when sections are given. Cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Charging NiMhs, one for Doug?...
    Right, gentlemen who know fings, here are shots of the wires I have. OK, I must have put the banana plugged wires in a box marked R/C Gear, I'm assuming, but the charger's wires mainly have brick red flat contact -containing plugs. However, none of my battery packs have those, they have the white things with two small round pins in 'em, one socket square, one round. The newest pack for binding duties has a little black jobby that fits the Rxs. Pictures included of all relevance. I tried to charge an old(ish) lead acid after making up a lead, but the charger put up a "Connection Break" legend on its screen. I assume that means, That one's f****d, mate. Fair enough, I thought it might be. But i still haven't worked out a lead to charge those green wrapped old NiMhs. I HAVE charged them before, because I have had two attempts at flying the aircraft. it went round in circles and then took a slate off my daughter's roof, proving that aircraft models really DO need insurance! Anyway, enclosed are three pics. The shot of a Lipo is to show that I do have such things, but that dates way back and although not damaged or bulged hasn't been charged while I've had it. it was sent to me with 2 small outrunner brushless jobbies and a couple of brushed ESCs as a thankyou for sending
    plywood
    to a part of Britain that the PO won't go to with biggish parcels. Finally....I have today received my FlySky RC set and guess what? it all works, perfectly, out of the box. it's PRE-BOUND! Whoopee do! it musdt be an upgrade as it came with a small Li-Po battery pack for the Tx. and a charge lead from USB to Tx. body. That's all great, but how do I know how long to charge it for? it currently has what looks like a full charge on it, judging by the brightness of the LEDs. Getting used to a passable impression of my son's old Subaru front wheel and tyre (complete with vented disc and caliper behind!) will take a while. I am guessing that pushing the throttle trigger forward is like a brake on a car. I assume on a boat it would be reverse? The instructions are not in any way exhaustive! But hey...on a tatty old Futaba servo it all worked a treat. Here's the pics of wires. Cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Fibreglass hull/deck fit
    Fits but leaves gaps suggest to me that it only really fits where it touches, as my Dad used to say. Which suggests a wavy deck edge. Not worth the hassle. if it'll fit once cut, cut it, back it up and fill. I would imagine you could bond in some 2mm styrene or
    plywood
    then fill over that with a car body filler, to smooth the joint. I am assuming the deck is meant to fit that hull? You never know! Cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    what have I got?
    Bryan, yep, that is a Bassett-Lowke. I was going to say, but wifey has had me out doing stuff on and off all day. I can't moan as she's bought me a new RC set for my birthday next month. I think your Bassett-Lowke motor will be fine and the new mags from Oz sound great. My Basset-Lowke goes well with its own mags so far and is going in my Darby One Design stepped racer (a la Oulton Broad). I would keep it all as is, just do some repairs. That cabin roof looks like it could be repaired or replaced without spoiling things. Cellulose sanding sealer is your best friend on
    plywood
    models as it puts that slight amber tinge to the wood, existing or new. Doug's yer man to advise on batteries and lecktricks generally. Looking forward to seeing this progress. Cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay


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