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    Blog
    Aerokits 46'' twin screw brushless conversion
    Today I had a run with the new batteries, and It was a great success. I wasn't after more speed, although I couldn't help myself seeing how fast It would go, but wanted more efficiency, which didn't happen as I went too fast, and better
    run time
    . When you have a big lake all to yourself on a sunny bank holiday morning, you just got to open It up. Data logging was on board, so with 5 cells per motor, almost 20 mins going fast most of the time, I recorded 25.3mph which Is stupid speed for this boat as It Is so heavy now and a whopping 939watts, 51.82 amps, which are maximum spikes. On a smaller lake It would last a lot longer, but I like speed! πŸ˜€
    6 years ago by pmdevlin
    Forum
    LiPo batteries
    Please can I get some advice on LiPo batteries. I intend to buy a 3300-5000mAh battery to run an offshore power boat model. I will be taking the battery with me to Hungary to use on my local river which I have found is ok as hand luggage properly protected from short circuit. My problem is that at present, I only go there three time a year so the battery would remain unused for 4 months at a time. If I leave the battery with a safety charge, will it last for four months unused or will it fall below the critical voltage. If it is felt that it will not hold the charge, I will have to carry it with me forward and back. Thanks.😊
    2 years ago by MouldBuilder
    Response
    Basic hull construction completed
    Nice hard work, well done i now usually get a glass fibre hull if i can. Ive run mine with Irvine 40, and 2 different brushless, 2075 kva and 1150 motors and all performed well 3 or 4 cell lipos, go for the biggest capacity 5200`s as the weight is no problem and double your
    run time
    . Pic shows latest motor i think its 2900 kva ill try it out soon. I seem to use the Huntsman then take the motors out for other projects
    9 months ago by vortex
    Blog
    Detailing the deck.
    Some obeche coaming strips were added to the insides of the well deck and a piece was added at the rear which notches into the side coamings, this required shaping to the curvature of the deck so I wound some masking tape around a pencil to the required diameter and marked a line on the coaming to sand the profile down to. This piece won’t be fixed in place until I have added some internal detail in the rear of the well deck. Some thin strip was fitted along the sides of the deck which form part of the β€˜treads’ that run the length of the cabin sides, these were glued and pinned in place after the edges and ends were rounded. At this point I applied some β€˜Antique Pine’ stain to the bulwarks, rubbing fenders and deck strips. The position of the treads that run along the deck for the length of the cabin sides were marked by taking a measurement from the plan and transferring this to the deck strips. The tread angle from the plan was determined to be 68 degrees using a digital angle finder (another little bargain find in Lidl for less than a tenner πŸ‘πŸ‘) and position marks pencilled on the deck. I chose to mark and apply these treads as per the model that is in the National Maritime Museum which I’m following to recreate my version of the Police Launch. These β€˜photos have been very helpful in detailing this model. They can be seen here: https://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/67590.html I used some temporary spacer strips along the cabin sides and deck strips and then cut and shaped each tread individually to fit in the desired positions, all the treads were fixed using a couple of dots of superglue making sure that no glue got onto the deck surface as CA and aliphatic glue does affect the way the obeche accepts the wood stain as I discovered when I did some β€˜colour tests’ earlier. The whole deck was then given a very light rub down with a fine abrasive pad before the first of several coats of β€˜Teak’ stain was applied. The contrasting colours of the Antique Pine and Teak stain works well on this model and is in keeping with the wood colours of the NMM model that I’m using as a reference. EDIT…..I have just noticed that the digital angle finder and digital callipers are back on sale at Lidl on 3rd of March for Β£9.99 each…….still a bargain πŸ˜πŸ‘ https://www.lidl.co.uk/en/MiddleofLidl.htm?articleId=20539
    10 months ago by robbob
    Forum
    Shroud for Model Air Boat
    Good Morning Chief Petty Officer. Glad to hear of some enquiry about air boats. I built a few of these in the mid to late 1960s and they were great fun. I powered them with engines like the Cox Babe Bee up to a Frog 150R diesel. All were free running of course and it was either a keep fit excercise to try and catch them before they hit the bank across the lake or in most cases there was always a good person ready to perform the "save".. Due to political correctness and the environment. the I.C powered versions are consigned to history . Them days we didnt have shrouds over the airscrews. Best method of securing a shroud is to use ZAP Z-Poxy Resin. it is durable, water resistant and can be bought from good model shops and is a two pack. One bottle contains the resin and the other the hardner. its a 50/50 mix and you can purchase a range of them with various setting times. 😎Boaty
    10 months ago by boaty
    Forum
    Being Sociable.
    "Why go to all that trouble of adding artificial engine sounds and smokers, when you can have it all and more, by installing a gas boiler and steam engine. When I think of the problems involved to find plans and scratch build a boat, why not go for the authentic look and fit a steam engine." 1. Cost. 2. Space available in the model. 3. Complexity of the engine and difficulty of control. 4. Fire risk, and not just to the model.😲 5. Shorter
    run time
    s, longer 'steam up' times. 6. Unsuitabilty for many types of ships / boats. I.e. originals weren't steamers. If I read above posts correctly I thought you had already found at least two kindred spirits here. I'm sure that if you take the time to cull throught the hundreds Build Blogs and technical Posts here you will find others. Try using the Search function. See the panel on the left of the Home page. Good luck,😎 BTW: Nobody likes a fanatic! Don't get steamed up 😁
    10 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Help with vintage rc.
    I wouldn't want to stop people running old kit - far from it! I have a single-channel 1962 Macgregor with a Kinematic which I use occasionally - when there's no other 27Mhz around. But you need to be aware of the issues. With this sort of kit (and even worse for valve systems) you will find that summer is for sailing, and winter is for repairing. Here is the start of a thread on RC Groups with myself and Taurus Flyer sorting out a capacitor problem on the TX - which meant reverse engineering both the Rx and TX.... https://www.rcgroups.com/forums/showthread.php?2609824-Reverse-engineering-and-repair-of-a-vintage-Metz-Mecatron-single-channel-radio/page32 One example of problems you may encounter is that the caps in old kit tend to die, particularly if the equipment has not been used for many years. Electrolytics, in particular, suffer. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrolytic_capacitor#Failure_modes,_self-healing_mechanism_and_application_rules You can sometimes reform the electrolytics by turning the TX and Rx on and leaving them powered up for a day or so. it's tricks like this that you need to be aware of if you are going to run vintage equipment....
    10 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    RC steam lever
    Hi Gary Yes I watched the videos great work . I only have a small boiler but should get about 15 mins.
    run time
    and yes I'm hoping the eyes hold up the good thing is I can take my time at it. The slide valve timing may be another issue I will have to learn. Will keep you up to date when the engine comes in . Rick
    10 months ago by Newby7
    Forum
    RC steam lever
    Hi Rick, and there is no news like good news, I promise you will not regret buying the engine, a wonderful piece of kit and runs like a Swiss watch. its crowning glory is the fact it runs on less than 30 PSI an easy boiler pressure to maintain. I am sure you will enjoy building the engine and sorting out the slide valve timing, and you will have a good understanding of exactly how it works. Hoping the old eyes are still sharp, for all those tiny screws. Regards, Gary. PS. The ideal boiler size is 3 1/2" dia. 6" length, will give you near enough 30 mins.
    run time
    .
    10 months ago by GaryLC
    Blog
    Rescue Vessel - Springer Tug
    Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent
    run time
    . Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe
    12 months ago by Joe727
    Forum
    1950s sea commander refurb.
    This old sea commander was built by my dad in the mid 50's. With the help of the wife, we have started to repair and rebuild, the wife stripped it down. Doug (RNmunich) is rebuilding my taycol supermarine ready to fit into it. So far we have relaminated some of the hull boards and cabin sides. Sealed some of the sprung joints with 2 pack epoxy. Once that's had 48 hours hardening time I will rub down and coat the hull in glass cloth and Eze-Kote. I have 1 problem, the main cabin roof is missing and I don't have any plans to remake, so if anyone can help me please let me know. Thanks for reading, watch for updates in the coming weeks. Cheers Colin.
    10 months ago by Colin H
    Forum
    Being Sociable.
    Hello to Rick and Peejay, Rick this bit is for you, Good to hear you have a steam engine fitted, and are contemplating a bench run to see how long it will run on a boiler full of water. it will bench run longer than on the water as the engine has no loading, I would recommend you fit a gas cut off valve to be on the safe side. I once years ago ran out of water and had to watch the boiler turn its wooden lagging to charcoal. No major damage was done but it did smell a bit for some time. Peejay may I suggest that you Google the likes of Microcosm and other Chinese manufacturers of model steam engines, there is an awful lot out there you will be surprised, try for a twin double acting side valve as they are very efficient, and will run on only 20 - 30 PSI, plus a 1/2" bore twin cylinder will easily power a one metre length hull. Regards to you both, Gary.
    11 months ago by GaryLC
    Forum
    Fairmile D 1/24 Scale Build
    Not suggesting Doug dosn't give good advice or is nothing other than a skilled builder, but the way that post was written came across to me as I described. Is it such a problem if my boat wont run for more than 10 minuets at full steam, come on man how often do you imagine that scenario evolves, most of the time is spent gently cruising around the pond with the occasional full throttle run to wake up the old farts. Tut Tut such disgraceful behaviour.
    11 months ago by bikerjohn57
    Forum
    Fairmile D 1/24 Scale Build
    Hi biker, Depends on whether you want to build true scale model and build it 'right', or just a near scale 'Runabout'. Rowen has learned (with a little help form his friends πŸ˜‰) to build it right which is extremely satisfying and the correct detail underwater truly compliments his superb detailing above the waterline. To me the two are inseparable. Seems to me that that is what Andy wants as well. I applaud him. About time we gave him some constructive answers - but first we need to know something about his boat:- Length, beam, probable max weight? If all you want is a near scale quickbuild fast runabout John there are plenty of ARTR/RTR options on the market. But then; that's just my opinion - and whadda I know!😁 Look forward to at least some pics / vids of your boat in action Biker. Cheers, Doug 😎
    11 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    6 Volts of Course!
    Captain's Log: Well I found a 6 volt 8.5 amp Battery. For my Brooklyn to use! Just have to order her main motor and a new smoker! Both of which will be at 6 volts! Now, if I've done my math right! And all I use is her main motor. I would end up with about 2.5 hours of
    run time
    ! But, if I use her main motor and smoke. I will end up with a little over 1.5 hours of
    run time
    ! I was lucky in that I have a buyer. For her old 12 volt motor and 12 volt smoker! They have about an hour of use! Not exactly what I call used. But, Have to sell as used equipment!
    11 months ago by figtree7nts
    Directory
    (Naval Ship) March'71
    The BEST thing about this one is, she's very smooth on the run. Decent power, makes it more fun. When it turns with speed, gets down like a bike. So that's the time when it leaks a tiny amount of water. Bcz it's not waterproof on the deck. Can take 2s-3s Lipo. Bcz the motors are 3s rated only. Have a plan to change them into better Mabuchi ones. (Motor: 180 brushed motor) (ESC: Hnadmade by arduino) (8/10)
    11 months ago by Sakibian
    Blog
    Weight Too Much!
    Captain's Log: After careful consideration. I have decided to use only one battery at a time! This being 6.5 lbs. is way too much weight. Her bow is too low to the waterline. She get's thrown off by the weight. So, one battery at a time will be used! Now, having lowered the volts. From 12 volts to 6 volts is a problem. See her main motor and smoker. Are 12 volts each! So, now I have to replace. The main motor and the smoker. To a 6 volt system! This is not so easy. If any of you are familiar. With Dumas and Harbor model products. You know this ain't cheap!😭 Luckily, I will be selling both parts. Together next month! As both parts are in new condition! I will then order a 6 volt main motor and Smoker! Oh, each battery will give me about 1.5 hours of
    run time
    ! And that's not bad at all..... NOTE: I'm only losing $10.00 on the resale of her Motor and Smoker!
    11 months ago by figtree7nts
    Directory
    (Tug Boat) Steam Tug Challenge
    This little model was built to see how much my Parkinson's had affected my modelling abilities. Surprisingly little as it turned out but I cannot write legibly and find keyboards tricky too. it must be muscle-memory! The model is loosely based on Challenge and is built around a tug hull that I made as a boy I made in the sixties but with some modification. She is fully lit for night running. The crew figures are model railway lineside track gang models. They have been left in their modern high viz and helmets as the model is depicted as she is today operated in preservation as a Dunkirque little ship. She is equipped with 2 function R/C. She has not yet maidened at the time of photographing (ESC: Motroniks) (5/10)
    12 months ago by wunwinglo
    Blog
    Day Two Springer
    Springer build log for website Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery vessel. I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent
    run time
    . Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe Day 2 Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch plywood from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade drill press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. if you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic, woodworking, etc., a good practice is to use this both adhesive and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate adhesive. Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe
    12 months ago by Joe727
    Response
    Oh, NO Water Everywhere!
    Ed, I do want Doug does, attach a silicone tube and run it up and so filling with grease is easy. Periodically, I use a large syringe to apply pressure while running the motor to make certain its getting the grease. As to finding the leaks, next time it gets water in the hull, pick it up with water still in it, dry it off with a towel and lift it up high. Look to see where it's leaking. When I Build fiberglass hulls they look good but I soon learned to fill them with water full. (Prior to putting anything inside) Lift it up and there always a few pin holes in the hull, you never see them normally, but under the water pressure it will shoot tiny stream of water into the air. Mark and patch. Regard, Joe
    12 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    1-35 Scale Schenllboot By TeeJay
    Hi all for the second blog report on the schnellboot I am going to go over the rudder a propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat, these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts. which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel) and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum powder mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The fourth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I must ask for some help could anyone advise me on the length of propeller shafts, I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft, but port and starboard will have to be longer. and I also need advice on selecting the motors, I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.
    1 year ago by teejay
    Forum
    steam water pump
    sent you a photo of a mechanical boiler feed pump connected to an oscillating V4 engine. get on eBay and type in Microcosm steam engines. if you use a decent size boiler for your steam engine you should get 20 to 30 minutes run-time. Let me know how you get on. Regards.
    1 year ago by GaryLC
    Blog
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Back to the build. Next milestone, to complete the superstructure and engine covers. The superstructure is essentially a cowl that supports the open bridge and serves as the air intake for the gas turbines. The engine covers fit into the rear of it. The superstructure is full of curves and will be interesting to make. Still trying to save weight, decided to make it out of glassfibre. Rather than first make a plug then a female mould and finally the cowl, wanted to try the technique of making a plug out of styrene foam sheet, then covering it in a glass fibre matt. Once the glass fibre is set, the foam is dissolved out using a solvent and the cowl remains – inshallah! To ensure the foam did not react to the glass fibre resin, painted the finished cowl with enamel paint before sticking the matt down. See pictures. What a mess! The resin had crept under the paint and into the foam dissolving it. When the resin dried the plug had shrunk slightly and had the surface finish of a quarry. First thought was to hurl it and start again, this time in wood. On second thoughts, wondered if the plug could still be used. Decided to build it up with wood filler and from it make a female mould, as originally intended. The cowl would then be made from the mould. Built the damaged plug up and sanded it smooth. As the plug would be covered in fibreglass, the surface finish was not critical. Brushed a coat of fibreglass on the plug and, after drying filled any defects with glaze putty and sanded smooth. Once the finish and dimensions were satisfactory, applied a thicker coat of glass fibre to the plug. This was again smoothed down, waxed with carnauba polish and then covered in mould release. From it the cowl was made. Picture shows plug, mould and cowl placed side by each. The cowl requires reinforcement; the fittings and various mountings then adding before installing. A trial installation showed that it fitted properly the deck and was accurate. A lesson for the next time is to make the plug and mould much deeper than the finished item. That will allow any rough edges, on either the mould or the component, to be trimmed off leaving a smooth fibreglass edge.
    1 year ago by RHBaker
    Response
    Broads Light Class Cabin Cruisers
    Many thanks Richard indeed. Yes, decades of knowing these craft in real form and the designers and builders right back has hugely helped us of course gain such a first class reputation of precise detail. However, like all these things, such has not come without heartache, where in running up a one year purposeful trial as a manufacturing business for these, I simply failed in being far too much of a perfectionist, and this took too long in getting every kit out. Although we perfected the trial run on time for every customer, we realised it could not continue without mass stress for a sustained period of years, and so sadly had to pull the plug on the purposeful trial, much to the disappointment of many potential customers. Broke our hearts too, but then, what were we to do, our pride told us to pull back before running up a full production.
    1 year ago by NorfolkBroads
    Response
    Broads River Cruiser Yachts
    Many thanks Guys, yes we did a trial business in 2016, to test the market 'Broadland Classics'. The initial runs sold with real enthusiasm, and reported back to us the best they had ever had as kits, however, sadly, my own failure was being far to fussy on getting every kit out more than perfect, and treating the kits as so individual to every customer per real commissions, that I slowed down the production process massively, thus creating self worries on demands, which I became concerned if we could not keep up with supply. We were so lucky to have gained the original lines plans from these classics life sized craft, but I had to make a decision, and following our one year trial, ceased, which I recognise broke many potential customers hearts. I was simply not prepared to do mass production in the sense of same, same. Every customer to us had to have their kits as though the real thing, beyond perfect,a commissioned kit if you like. I know perhaps crazy, but there you go, it is what we strived for and just took far longer than any other kit manufacturer to produce. We are looking at way of perhaps re-producing the kits that people may enjoy, or even do commissions, but just need to carefully think it all through one final time. Being we have the complete rights to the designs in model form, there is no rush from our part against competition, and of course only we know every real detail imposed on the real Broads craft to relay to every kit. Lots to think about all over again, but it has finally come to light following lots of enquiries of our kits, that we simply wanted to show them in their pride and glory here. Cheers to you all.
    1 year ago by NorfolkBroads
    Directory
    (Pleasure Craft) Sally forth
    Pictures to follow. ply deck and cabin scratch built on glass fibre hull from an anglers bait boat. As a novice I am unsure on amps and running times etc. (Motor: mtronics 700) (ESC: mtronics) (7/10)
    1 year ago by bluebird2
    Forum
    My other hobby
    Good to see other PPLs and former PPLs on the Model Boats website. I took mine at Liverpool Airport known now as JLA (John Lennon Airport) in June 1984 and completed it in January 85. Trained with Liverpool Flying School aka Keenair in Cherokee 140s and a PA 38 Tomahawk. Later I moved into Air Nova which was also a Liverpool club and the actor Lewis Collins was also a member of that Club. At the time I was a member of Merseyside IVC (Inter Varsity Club) thus had plenty of passengers. One of them was Victoria Field, my former psychology lecturer who later became famous as a psychologist and writer. Eventually Air Nova moved to Hawarden Airport near Chester but the Club folded shortly after. I then joined the in house Club based at the field and I ceased flying in November 2016. Best flights were going over Snowdon VFR and down the Dee Valley. I also flew over Colwyn Bay to have a look at the boating lake though I haven't sailed there. I also saw the lakes at Llandudno West Shore and LLanfairfechan. The latter I am considering for sailing my fast electrics. Downside to PPL flying was the crosswind component of the aircraft being 17 knots , At Hawarden there is only one runway the 04/22 and Liverpool the 09/27. I did have to cancel many times due to this. Thankfully sailing model boats is much more enjoyable as we don't have that many snags to deal with and if the motor stops we don't have to do an emergency landing.😎😁😁 Boaty
    1 year ago by boaty
    Forum
    My other hobby
    Hi. Mi private pilots license also does not include night flying. But interesting is to consider when they define what is included. When having a certain number of instructed night flights you are entitled to fly in the vicinity of an airport. Vicinity of an airport German definition is that you have to be able to see the traffic in the pattern of an airport. When I did my flight from San Jose, CA to Phoenix SkyHarbour, I was able to see the traffic being about 1.5 hours from the airport. The night definition is that the night begins 30 minutes after sunset. So was entitled to do this night approaches as you can see the traffic in the pattern, on a large airport like Sky Harbour, and in the Southwest of the USA from very far. But when doing these landing operations at a large international airport, shortly before touch-down you are flying into a black hole. Due to this on my first landing in Sky Harbour, I made an awful 3-point-landing making the plane jump 2 or 3 times. Fortunately, I was aware of how to react properly when this happens. The second special experience is when you are taxiing on the runway to get to its exit and report "runway vacated" in a small plane like a Cessna Cutlass the lights lose their structure. So I went to search for the yellow line on the left side of the runway until it curved into the exit. But this yellow line and the blue runway lights are hugely distant from each other so I had to focus my efforts to stay to the right of the blue lights but still being able to see the yellow line. Once I crossed the lines that mark that you are leaving the runway I could report back to the tower "runway vacated". My second-night landing was when I did try to fly to an airport next to the "Grand Canyon". As the report of the airport said expect gain or lose 40 knots of speed on final I decided not to land and flew back To Phoenix. What a wonderful experience. The landscape was already impressive on my flight to the Grand Canyon, but it was topped when I flew by night. First I was in contact with one center in charge while being above a certain altitude. Then this center passes you to one in charge below that altitude. Makes you feel like a professional pilot. Finally, this center did pass me to the tower of Sky Harbor. I was approaching from the north. Then, what controllers of large airports like they make you cross the airport midfield what ensures you stay away from the other traffic of the airport. You cannot imagine what a sight it is when you approach a large city like Phoenix by night. After he gave me its clear to land I was remembering my awful night landing earlier. When I did have the feeling that I was about to touch-down I did control the airplane so that all you felt on touch-down was the vibration of the wheels turning. A Geman friend of mine that was on the plane with me was so impressed that he said he would fly again with me at any time. One other fact I want to share is the importance to really dominate the phraseology of radio communication and what Americans call to know the system. On my first approach by night to Phoenix, I did confuse the last VOR with the ILS beacon. So when switching to what I thought to be the last VOR the needle got full to the right and stayed there. So I did a report I was not able to tune in the VOR and so tower did give me instructions for the further approach. When you fly in from the west you fly over a mountain full of antennas and the red lights on top of it. I felt very good being routed by the tower. Those of you familiar with night-flight and how to find the location of the airport know the rule of the black spot within the lights of the city is where the airport is. Well, Sky Harbor has the terminal building between its 2 runways and so Sky Harbor does not look like a black spot. So when the tower asked me if I had field in sight I did respond negative a couple of times until he reported that I was on the 45 for the runway. Then I finally saw the airport. Here is something that is the consequence of good radio training. My instructor always said to report negative until you are really enabled to say affirm. So Tower knows when you are really able to report affirm. Do not be shy, it is your and others life! The second time on that approach was when tower gave me the instruction: 3-60 to the right until further advice! My teacher played the role of the tower and one of the things he said to teach us the right behavior was to stay silent and fly as instructed until tower contacts you again. I do confess I had never done 3-60s neither by night nor during the day! So I put the plane into a standard curve, kept it there, watched my altitude and speed. Being so familiar with this instruction from the tower I felt "at home" and this being relaxed was very useful!
    1 year ago by Hellmut1956
    Forum
    Proboat UL19
    Just had a new Proboat UL19 Hydroplane delivered. Has anyone had any experience with one. It says 4 to 6S lipo but it mentions not to run flat out all the time on 6S and advises to reduce power in the turn to save the electrics overheating. Never had this info with my Backjack 29 and new Sonic Wake as both don't overheat when at full throttle. For some reason the UL19 has a larger prop fitted than the two other boats and the Blackjack has an Octura prop which I got from Prestwich Model Boats and goes very well. The motor in the UL19 is the same as the one in the Blackjack. My theory is that as the UL19 is a hydroplane which when set up is heavier at the bow and will need an extra burst of power to get it up on the plane. Boaty😁
    1 year ago by boaty
    Forum
    A return to the hobby!
    I also tend to use Sla batteries a model this size should easily be able to take a 12v 7ah battery, some of my models I have to use 2 batteries, 1for ballast or in parallel to give longer running time. The 660 motor should be fine, what size prop are you going to use. Cheers Colin.
    1 year ago by Colin H
    Blog
    Vintage Model Works 46'' RAF Crash Tender
    Here's the history bit so pay attention... Many years ago as a boy in the fifth year of my north London secondary school, circa 1971, our woodwork class was given the option to make something of our own choice. Having mastered the majority of joints, wood turning, finishing techniques and the making of table lamps, stools and bookshelves etc. this seemed a good idea, so myself and a fellow classmate and model making chum asked if we could construct a model boat. The teacher, on hearing that it was to be from a kit and not from scratch was a little surprised but agreed. So my friend and I jointly invested about 20 quid in an Aerokits 34.5 inch RAF Crash Tender from Blunts' model shop in Mill Hill (long since gone like many others) and we set about construction during lesson time and sometimes at break times. I recall we used "Cascamite" to glue it all together on the advice of the woodwork teacher because neither 'Scotch' glue nor PVA was suited to marine construction. Good progress was made over the course of our last year at school but it was never fully completed, only requiring painting, running gear and detailing. My friend decided that he needed to withdraw from the project as he was enrolling in a college away from home to study for a career in the merchant navy and I agreed to buy out his share and continue with the project. And so it was that I carried on with the painting and installing the running gear which consisted of a 1.5 cc marine diesel engine, water pickup, prop shaft and rudder and a MacGregor radio system with a stick for steering and a single button for speed control. The engine and radio came from Michael's Models in Finchley (also long gone) for Β£20 as my elder brother, who had started a Saturday job there, was able to get a staff discount for me. The diesel engine was noisy and smelly and a pig to start with a leather thong around the flywheel and I decided to abandon this means of propulsion (I foolishly ran it for slightly too long 'dry' and melted the soldering around the brass water jacket!). By now I had graduated from my part time job in Woolies to an engineering apprentice with Post Office Telephones and my new income of 20 quid per week could support my modelling and electronics hobbies after my contribution to the household for my keep. So off to the model shop to buy a Taycol Supermarine electric motor, two 12v volt lead acid batteries and a suitable charger. The diesel came out and was sold on Exchange & Mart and the mount and coupling re-made to accommodate the new Taycol motor. What an improvement that was! I can't remember now what speed controller or servo I used but whatever it was did the job, and it went like the clappers on Friary Park boating lake (also long since gone) even though the radio control system was a bit crude with the non-proportional steering and 'blip' throttle control. The boating took a back seat when I acquired my driving licence and my first car (a rusty old Cortina Mk 1) and I also got involved in sound recording for radio. I decided to sell the boat and bits for Β£60 through Exchange & Mart and bought an Akai 4000DS tape recorder and a 'Chilton' audio mixer, built a home studio and along with a good mate of mine started making radio commercials for the new commercial radio stations including London's Capital Radio. We even won a 'Campaign' advertising award for one of our efforts! And so after several years as a 'phone engineer I moved into professional recording for A/V and broadcast and then into TV production. Fast forward to today. Semi-retired with grand kids and with more free time on my hands I still had an interest in model making so in Jan 2016 went to the Model Engineer exhibition at nearby 'Ally Pally'. It was there that I saw an RAF crash tender just like the one I built all those years ago and got into conversation with the chap on the stand. This re-ignited my model making interests and I researched the hobby and that model in particular.
    3 years ago by robbob
    Response
    BRAVE BORDERER - BRUSHLESS SUMMARY
    I used this pump from E Bay which pumps well, and with the rubber mounts is quiet. 6-12v (I use a 2 cell LiPo which seems perfect) and am cooling 2 2000kv 28mm in-runners. Have tried a few different pumps and these have been the best so far. You have to be careful that you don't over pressurize your plumbing system, as if the hoses come off while running you can fill your boat up in no time. it's safest to adjust your pump voltage or piping to a 'neutral' pressure rather than risk hosing down your electrics. I used twin pick-ups behind the props and separate feeds, one for the pump and one direct in case the pump stopped or blocked.
    1 year ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Brushless motors (again)
    Again, as not wanting to nick someone else's thread. Huntsman 31 currently has a geared (belt) brushed motor which was probably quite a good spec. many years ago. I don't remember how quick it was but having watched brushless boats running this morning in Southsea I have decided now is the time for change before I start painting. I've been reading various threads and gleaned some info but it is still a minefield. Whilst this boat (original) is twin screw I am not yet ready to go that far so will stay single screw. A thread suggested 3639 -1100KV which is fine as a spec. but there are a zillion different makes and models for that spec. Cornwall models seem to offer 6 or 8 so I am looking for more specific advise for make and model of each piece of the power system...motor, ESC, battery, charger. I'm not going to say 'money no object' just that I don't 'need' to buy bottom spec. I suspect there will be as many different suggestions as 'Cornwall' have motor makes but something good will come out of it. Many thanks Steve
    1 year ago by steve-d
    Blog
    1-35 scale S100 schennllboot
    Hi all for the second blog report on the schenllboot I am going to go over the rudder an propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat , these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts .which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel)and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum power mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The forth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I have to ask for some help could any one advise me on the length of propeller shafts , I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft but port and starboard will have to be longer . and I also need advice on selecting the motors , I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.
    2 years ago by teejay
    Response
    Spraying Again.......
    Mornin' Neville, ."How wet is wet"? Hold the paper under a running tap, warm water, until it goes dark all over. Remove excess water with kitchen roll. You don't have to flood the hull but keep the paper well wetted. For convenience I use the Tamiya sanding sponges. They mould themselves to any shape they are used on which is great for compound curves. Keep a bowl of warm water handy to re-wet the paper or sponge from time to time and to clean of the residue that builds up on the paper. Also regularly wipe off the slurry that builds up on the object you are sanding with kitchen roll or a damp flat dense kitchen sponge. When you are finished wash off the hull (or whatever) with the the flat sponge and clean water. Dry off carefully with kitchen roll or non-linting cloth. DON'T do a bath test with just primer on the hull as the primer is porous! it consists mostly of finely ground chalk dust or similar in a solvent suspension. Wait until you have at least the first top coat on to seal it. You only have to look at a car with a primed wing, that has then been driven around in typical British weather for a few weeks, to see why!! Don't forget the 'secret ingredient' πŸ˜‰ All the best, Doug 😎 PS Nearly forgot 😲 Start using a few drops of liquid soap on the w&d from the final preparation of the primer coat through til the end.
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    RC....mixers? And other unknowns..
    Ok... Currently trying to build a Itaieri Schnellboot, ...but am questioning if what little I think I know to be correct/ workable... I have amassed the following : 3- Hobbyking ST3007 1100KV brushless motors each direct drive to 32mm plastic props.... (2 right hand drive and 1 left hand drive props... swapped over leads on on motor to get it to run as yet untested the left hand prop) 3- Turnigy nano tech 3s 3000mh 25-50C Lipo ( Have got a balance charger and board , flame proof charge bag , battery voltage check/ alarm units, and will check and charge them await the only local help I have in RC / lips battery a helicopter flyer who has no experience with RC boats ) I just read the post on WTail mixer and wonder if I need that or if my current unkowning idea to just connect all 3 ESC β€˜s together to one channel on the radio , again was give Eflite Blade SR HP6DSM 2.4GHz to try out ,Will this unit work or do I need something else , currently will/ can use all 6 channels but would / could use more if I had them ... last time I had anything to do with RC was a a kid/ teen and back then you had ground radios and flight radios and the two should not be mixed .. Ok please advise , how far off am I or am I still within range of keeping it simple ? Thanks All Bill
    1 year ago by BW3
    Forum
    Old outboard motor...
    Believe that was the dog's dilemma as well! 😁 Since my little inflatable is only about 10 to 12", and was originally a free running toy, it's not worth that much for an outboard. I'll just see if I can soup up the original motor a little. It has has a blow up valve, like beach balls huff huff huff - collapse, so I was thinking of filling it with something like building foam, as used for cavity filling etc, and putting an alu plate in the floor for stiffening and to carry the necessaries, disguised under driver's console and equipment boxes & benches. Pics of your dinghy? Time to test the new camera? Cheers, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Kingsmere Model Boat Club
    I do know there is a large pond in Norwich in Eaton Park and you can run any type of boat on that pond. if I ever win the lottery big time then I will buy somewhere in Norfolk with a couple of acres of land and have an enormous lake built so I can play boats when ever I want. Also have a small boat moored so when it runs out of fuel or for any other reason cuts out then I could recover it easily.
    1 year ago by BOATSHED
    Forum
    Kingsmere Model Boat Club
    When ever I went to watch the competitions straight running,it never seemed noisy to me ,and the pond was not particularly near to housing,and the large properties around there seem to have large gardens and you can bet a few of them will be merrily motor mowing ,strimming or leaf blowing on a Sunday afternoon.Sadly now the pond is a shadow of what it was a the edges all over grown and it seems to have shrunk in size the last time I looked at it .
    1 year ago by Ray
    Forum
    Anteo 2 Tug
    Hi Dick, I have a few tugs and the largest at 49" uses a geared 540 running from a 12v 7ah sla battery giving a good 90mins running time. This model weighs in at 15 kilos ready to sail. I also have a caldercraft model tug Joffre. Which is about 30" long and runs using a 6v monoperm motor and gearbox. 6v 4.5ah sla battery giving about 1 hour
    run time
    . Weight is 5kilos ready to sail. Hope this helps. Cheers Colin.
    1 year ago by Colin H
    Forum
    Kingsmere Model Boat Club
    Sorry no photos ,but I remember back in the late 60's early 70's spending some enjoyable Sunday afternoons sitting by the pond with my wife and children watching the straight running events against the Victoria club I believe,so that and seeing a guy with radio control air sea rescue launch got me started building model boats something which I had last done as a nipper.Does the King's mere club still exist,last time I went by the pond a few years back it had shrunk in size and was very overgrown around the edges.
    1 year ago by Ray
    Forum
    Twin Motor Perkassa
    I attach some pics of my 34" Perkassa. It uses two large water cooled brushed motors (650?). Two Mtronic 25amp ESCs with one red wire disconnected. You can see the ESCs on off switches over the former in the next to last pic. Presently has a Planet Tx/rx and I use 9.6v or 8.4v NiMhs of 3 to 5 amps. Not fused (naughty). The battery sits between the prop shafts towards the stern in a tray. I control the motors on the left and right sticks with the rudder on the right horiz stick. The left stick has a ratchet so I set the speed with that and use the right sticks to keep straight and steer. As an ex flyer this is an easy set up for me.
    run time
    is about 10/15 mins but that's long enough for me and the other models on the lake!
    2 years ago by Dave M
    Guestbook
    Guestbook Post
    Hi All. Many may already recognise the 'nutter from Munich' 😁 but I just wanted to say- I first stumbled across this site and enrolled here in 2014 but was still in harness and trundling around the world working with various navies and shipyards on all sorts of naval ships from small Fast Patrol Boats through subs, Corvettes and Frigates up to LPDs, Heli and Escort Carriers. So I didn't have much time for model building (sounds better than 'Modelling' somehow 😁😲) or contributions to the site, but I did try to keep up to date with advances, as I always did in my profession - Naval COMMS systems - and dipped in and out of this site without getting involved. Since I retired last year I have become an active member and have also dipped into, and registered with some, other Model Boat forums in various countries. But in all of them I have never found such an international, friendly and knowledgable bunch as on this site. Or such a well organised site where it is 'relatively' easy to find the info you need, or to just ask and get informed answers pronto. Sure there is room for improvement in some areas but "Tempus fugit" and things move on - so is it also on this site. I understand that a facelift and changes are afootπŸ˜‰ whatever the outcome I'm sure you won't find a better web site for informed (bin there done that!) info on model boat / ship building as well as research on the original vessels this side of the asteroid belt! Welcome aboard and Happy Building and Sailing, All the best, cheers, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Hobby Engine Factory Tug Motors
    Hi I have just read your post about your tug, I am one of those who modified mine to two new motors:- A. Because the original gear box nylon pinion gears split and there was no way that one could get them to fix securely back on to the motor shaft, plus the fact that when initially refitted they would no longer mesh and if the motors stopped at the wrong point they would not restart they just jammed. B. I wanted to make the tug more manoeuvrable so fitted separate speed controllers to each motor enabling me to run one motor forward and one in reverse this with suitable rudder positioning allows the tug to rotate on its axis with very little forward or reverse motion. C. I was able to use a 6v 4Ah Gel type battery which gives a much greater runtime. As to the old gearbox I think that because the gears were split it was disposed of. Somewhere in my harbour here there should be some photo’s of the conversion. I am now using speed 300 motors with a 2.5:1 reduction position much further forward in the hull an I made extension shafts to the original fitted ones, and it all works. Hope this helps and perhaps explained the need to change the original setup. Graham
    1 year ago by jelley_baby
    Forum
    motor sizeing
    Hi Jim I used a Hobbyking D3548/4 1100kv , a car ESC (hk60A-SL)(electric fan on top for cooling), program card(HK PROG-CARD) and a 40mm 2blade prop(test out the one on the boat first). Battery a 3s 5800mah 30C Lipo. This is in my Sea Commander and gives a good turn of speed with a long
    run time
    . ESC set up:- 1 Cutoff Voltage for 3S=10.2 and 4S=13.6 2 Start Power Percent=5% 3 Advance Timing=4 4 Run Mode=2 5 Brake Force=1 6 Drag Brake Force=1 7 Neutral Range=1 8 initial Brake Force=1 9 Reverse Force=1 Canabus
    1 year ago by canabus
    Media
    ASR 64ft R/C VID 2
    Boat is Scratch built 36" British Power Boat 64ft High Speed ASR Launch which belonged to the RNZAF. The launch was one of the 22 built and was shipped to NZ in 1940. it was the only one of its type in the Southern Hemisphere. Model has twin motors, ESCs, sound units etc. Has remotely switched water pump for water cooled brushless 2000kv in runner motors and remotely switched lighting. Uses 2x 2200mah 2s LiPos for drive and 1 1800mah LiPo for the pump (also a separate battery for the LED lights. Boat is built with strip planked balsa on ply frame and fiber glassed. Deck is ply, wheelhouse is varnished balsa. The colour is as it was for most of its time in the RNZAF . Took about 5 years on and off to build and finished it last year. (please ignore the time date - can't get rid of it .
    1 year ago by jbkiwi
    Blog
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Adjusted the transom flaps and reprogrammed the ESCs to the softest start settings, retested. Until now, the test runs did not have the duration or stability to really examine what was happening. Using 3 S batteries acceleration is rapid and a is plane quickly achieved. However, as the acceleration continues and speed increases, the bow digs in. A cloud of spray then surrounds the model as the plane is lost. Brushless motors do not modulate as smoothly as brushed and adjusting power tends to be erratic or exaggerated. This is a scale model and the propeller shaft angles are per the plans. The thrust from the propeller has two components, horizontal and vertical. The horizontal propels the vessel forward. However, the vertical component forces the stern upwards and, correspondingly, the bow down. Have moved as much weight as possible towards the stern to counteract this, limited by maintaining the correct displacement and waterline. The easiest solution is to reduce motor power, decreasing both speed and the lifting component. Decided to retry the 2S batteries as they give reduced power. A plane is again achieved, but as the motor response is more docile, it can be controlled. if the speed gets too high the bow lowers, as before, but the motor output can be more easily adjusted. Spent a pleasant half hour or so with the vessel accelerating onto and off a nice, controllable plane. Much less spray and drama than with 3S and much more controllable. Have now decided to revise plans and use 2S rather than 3 batteries. A further advantage is the motor noise is muted and now sounds more like a gas turbine than a dental drill! Finally feeling comfortable with the model. Will thus shelve further building until the late fall when sailing in Canada concludes. Want to enjoy the rest of my fleet in the meantime! Will summarize my experiences with brushless motors in another blog shortly for the benefits of others contemplating their use. After restarting the model will resurrect periodic build blogs to advise progress.
    1 year ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights
    Hi Pete, Welcome backπŸ‘ Yes, I did remove the moulded rungs. No chance of cramming the wiring in if you don't. I just twisted them out with a small pair of pliers and machined the rest out with a 3mm milling bit in my mini drill. I had hoped you would come to the 'cluttered' conclusion about the mast! Don't know of any standards for lamp spacing, never thought about. Spect there is, maybe Ed (figtree) knows, but he's having internet problems at the moment πŸ€” Thanks re antenna cables. Not difficult with a couple of chunks of copper wire and the pin-drill. Some time I will also add the two small booms carrying a GPS antenna and an anemometer. Re anchors: all tugs I've ever seen have anchors. This is on my list of 'Missing details on the model'. it's quite a long listπŸ€” Pics attached showing the anchor in a recess on the stbd bow. BECC still exist but only seem to sell through agents/stockists now. Here the US/Canada stockists;- http://www.becc.co.uk/contents/en-uk/d47.html This probably your best bet http://www.loyalhannadockyard.com/ Some of the others have disappeared😲 Look forward to your winch sketch, cos I wanna build one too! Cheers, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Huge liner model from 1929
    I often visit the British Pathe site, which has an archive of over 60,000 film clips covering an infinite range of subjects, going back to the beginning of the 20th century. I have wasted many hours looking at it. However, if you visit the site and punch in Miniature Mariners, (www.britishpathe.com/video/miniaturemariners/query/miniature+mariners), you will find an interesting selection from 1929, that includes the still extant Victoria Park Club running a hydroplane with a huge audience. The clips finish with a truly awesome liner model of about 40 feet length and apparently sea-going. The information board ( it was a silent film in 1929) tells us very little: it is French and 40 foot long. I know that it is a long time ago and French but do any other sailors know more about this?
    3 years ago by wunwinglo
    Forum
    LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights
    Mornin' Pete (it is in Germany anyway!) I agree, there are lots of details and 'standard equipment' missing from the basic model. You can see the winch and Life Raft canister in one of the photos of the original I posted above. Re Mast wiring; don't fiddle about putting a divider in the mast. it'll just get in the way. Attached is a pic of my modified mast. I used a 0.5mm brass wire on the right-hand side for the earth return. Wire is better than rod cos it's flexible (can be pushed into the corner). I glued it in with gel Gluper Sue WHEN all connections were soldered and tested. The LEDs are standard domed lens types. I ground the tops flat and painted the tops with several coats of matt black until it was opaque. After testing I closed off the mast with some plasticard and fitted ladder rungs made of copper wire. I also added the missing antenna cables to the bottom of the VHF IMM antennas, 0.5mm brass wire. (Some time I'll also fit the missing GPS antenna and anemometer.) Then painted the mast matt black. I then turned my attention to the searchlight and red/green NAV lights. First I stripped the wheelhouse roof and painted it white as in the original. On my model it was greyπŸ€” Then I drilled out the searchlight to accept a 5mm Bright White LED. You won't have to do this cos you have a later version with lights, mine had none 😭 Then had to paint the searchlight with several coats of matt black. Otherwise it just glowed all round! Pics show construction stages and finished lighting effect. All wires inside the wheelhouse roof I super glued to the ceiling and ran them down inside the funnels (stacks to you guys across the pond!πŸ˜‰) ready for connection to a switch board in the hull. While I was at it I rubbed the false Southampton name off the cabin using a 1000 grit Tamiya sponge and am preparing inkjet printed decals with the correct Wyeforce name and logo. Have fun getting all lit up Pete,😁 Cheers, Doug 😎 PS Attached some pics showing the original 'Southampton' πŸ˜‰ and making obvious what's missing on the model πŸ€”
    1 year ago by RNinMunich


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