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    40'' Seaplane Tender, new build
    Just started a 40" model of a 41'6" seaplane tender. I have been wanting to do one for years and now that my 36" 100 series 64ft HSL is done I was getting itchy fingers. Started with drawings from the 1976 Model Boats mag (part of the series on ASRs they did back then) which show frame shapes and positions, and enlarged them to 40" (A-O paper after rearranging the images on the A4 primary enlargement used as printing 'pattern' to enable max size on A-O. ) I did the same with the HSL and with a bit of fiddling got all the frames to line up nicely to shape. You have to be a bit inventive building this way regarding framing material etc, but it's possible if you have previous building experience. I found with these particular drawings that the frames were not drawn with identical profiles (left and right sides) so I had to create 1 side and flip it for the opposite side. I also had to create an extra frame between 2+3 as there was no real support for the stringers without it. The front top deck frame is cut from 3mm ply, as are the frames,-(ply is from packaging of a big Toyota Landcruiser axle recall which was done during my time at Toyota, which is 3 ply, very light, and perfect for this type of job, and not to mention, free!) I borrowed this frame method from the old 60s Vic Smeed MTB plan and it makes a good strong bow section to work with (used it on the HSL also.) Ply longerons are run through from transom to F2 with hardwood stiffening between transom and F4. Chine, gunwale and mid stringers are 4mmx2mm Beech, bottom stringers are 3x3 beech with mid stringer doubled. I may have to put extra stringers in the sides but that will depend on how the planks lie in the flares. planking will be 1.5mm balsa as the flares are quite pronounced especially in the bow area, and you just can't get
    sheets
    to go round the compound curves. Hull will be glassed and faired when finished and sealed with thin resin inside once everything is ready. Cabin is reasonably easy but takes a bit of working out and fiddling with due to lack of any plan, but it seems to be working out reasonably with the use of photos etc. The model is going to be a representation of a tender which was imported privately in the 50s by a doctor in the Milford sounds area here in the South Island of NZ, to enable him to visit patients, due to there being water access only in many of the remote areas. I have modified the drawings to represent this boat, which included changing the mast and removing the rear oval port and replacing it with a small round port, (not sure why this was changed, maybe an interior modification made the large port unnecessary ?) The boat ended up in Auckland at some stage and was owned by a family not far from my place for a number of years (pic is on the hard at our local yacht club in the 70s, - colour pic is from a friends super 8 movie taken from his boat, on an outing together with Jaguars owner 60s/70s). It is now apparently back in the South Island being restored. The model will use brushed 540 motors with twin ESCs etc but still a way off yet. I have to work out a way to make the cabin removable either with or without the rear cockpit, but more likely it will be a 2 piece job. It's a bit of a make it up as you go project. Model Boats frames boat
    sheets
    Landcruiser motors ESCs ๐Ÿ‘ Like ๐Ÿ’ฌ Comment ๐Ÿ—ฃ๏ธ Share 5
    3 months ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    Re: Not at all amused!
    I'd be more inclined to first contact the supplier / manufacturer and check if a build manual accidentally got left out. I'm assuming that (like my Deans Marine HMS Manxman kit) all plastic parts for the superstructure etc are either precut of printed on the
    sheets
    together with an individual part number. At the same time I would check the web for build blogs from folks who have gone before! Generally - "A picture tells a thousand words!". Cheers, Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    12 days ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Re: Ocean Going Tug: Atlantic
    Hi Commodore Sir, I'm not volunteering but I do have some experience of moving boats from the third floor. However, in my case it was real boats, not models. At the time, forty years ago, I lived in an upstairs maisonette, essentially third floor. I needed a tender for the 43ft Cat Schooner I was building (In a boatyard!). My lounge wasn't very big, but I decided I could just about build an 8ft praam dinghy in it. Luckily the lounge was at the end of a straight run to the front door. I designed it to be built from 3
    sheets
    of 8 x 4 ply and the actual build could be done in two evenings, not including painting. And so it happened. To get her out, I enlisted a friend to help. We carried her on her side to the balcony walkway outside the front door, lowered her down onto the pavement. Put her on top of the car., and that was it. She was such a pleasant dinghy to row or scull, that I soon built a new improved version complete with centreboard, rudder and sail. She sailed beautifully. Hope you are as successful. Nerys
    17 days ago by Nerys
    Forum
    Work with Balsa wood
    Hi All, Really surprised at all this "too short" only 18" stuff๐Ÿ˜ฎ I buy my balsa supplies from Krick here in DE. https://www.krickshop.de/e-vendo.php?shop=krick_e&SessionId=&a=re_search&SearchStr=searchfield_technic_0%3Abalsaholz&select=brand%3DKRICK Can still get 1m lengths of
    sheets
    and profiles. ๐Ÿ˜Š Get a stock in chaps and chapesses, before Boris Yellow Hammer mucks everything up!โ˜น๏ธ Snag is no local shops where you can "taste and try". So far so good though with Krick. If it's a bit soft I harden it with diluted EzeKote like Colin๐Ÿ‘ Surely SLEC etc must also have decent lengths? (Not what Alice might be thinking Nerys ๐Ÿ˜ฎ keep her under control! ๐Ÿ˜‰) Cheers, Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž PS Our posts crossed DG, thanks for the SLEC confirmation๐Ÿ‘)
    18 days ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Work with Balsa wood
    "....The trick is to feel how the plank likes to lay around a flare with the least stress, and go with that angle if poss...." Indeed. Woodworking's a skill, like riding a bicycle. You get to feel what the grain will let you do, and make use of the way it will move. You can see simple examples on other EeZeBilt plans, where items requiring extensive bending, like the transom of the Beaver tug, are required to be cut across the grain. ................ I remember back to the dawn of time, when there were still beam engines pumping water, the summers were blazing, the winters were white, 64k was as much core memory as anyone could possibly need and when you bought balsa
    sheets
    from the model shop the density was uniform throughout. ๐Ÿ˜ Nowadays machinery controls are non-intuitive graphics, any weather change is the subject of emergency alerts from the Met Office, you have gigabytes in a smart phone but no ability to control what goes where and when you buy balsa off the net it has bands of differing consistency along each sheet... ๐Ÿค‘
    18 days ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Work with Balsa wood
    If you are bending things like stringers, chine spray rails etc soak the part you want to bend in a trough (if you have one- wallpapering trough is good) of boiling water for about 4-5 mins, -remove and bend around screws/panel pins set to the radius on a flat board and weight down till dry (long enough pins will let you stack a number of pieces). If you are bending sheet balsa, the softer the better, (across the grain and with it, careful bending across,- snaps easily if too firm or thick) This will also depend on how tight a radius you need, ( if only gradual- like a clinker dinghy) you might get away with firm balsa. 2mmx 10mm wide strips will follow a curve nicely. For a bow with a flare you will need to plank (vert or angled)with soft to med balsa strips (10mmx 2mm or thereabouts)- gives you room to sand and fair. The trick is to feel how the plank likes to lay around a flare with the least stress, and go with that angle if poss. If the hull past the flare is flatish you can use whole
    sheets
    to speed things up. For the truest shape, complete planking gives the best result (although a bit time consuming and a bit more sanding involved). JB
    18 days ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Workshop
    Used 5mm Acrylic (perspex)
    sheets
    for my large sliding deck windows and it has been there for around 9 years without too much deterioration (faces Nth with full sun). I never touched it with any polish and just washed it with a hose on the outside, and it's stayed good all this time (pretty much self cleaning). Will scratch if you rub it with a cloth before removing dust though. Cost me about $600 for the 2
    sheets
    . Didn't want glass there as was too heavy and dangerous if it broke in the high winds we get here at times, (Acrylic flexes)
    29 days ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    Re: clyde puffer
    "That's how my free flight glider started out, 3
    sheets
    of 36x4x1/4", " So Doug are you saying that you started out 3
    sheets
    to the wind. LOL! Martin555.
    1 month ago by Martin555
    Response
    Re: clyde puffer
    "2
    sheets
    of 100x1mx4mm balsa" 100m balsa!๐Ÿ˜ฎ Wow! you must have ended up with wings bigger'n a 747 (75m) ๐Ÿ˜ Nice job JB๐Ÿ‘ That's how my free flight glider started out, 3
    sheets
    of 36x4x1/4", ca 2m wingspan. Caught a thermal on it's maiden flight on Hemswell Cliff and disappeared heading roughly North East๐Ÿ˜ญ ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    1 month ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    Re: clyde puffer
    Believe it or not, this started out with 2
    sheets
    of 100x1mx4mm balsa, planned/modified as I went, and it flew perfectly (gets near the ton in a slight dive) first time out. Wingspan 48" , 3548 1200kv, 4s 40c LiPo. Just used good old fashion eyeometry (and good luck.)
    1 month ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Workshop
    Martin you wont believe what I bought most of the stuff for mostly at a Lymington boot sale on various occasions - very near Setley Pond - my clubs home waters - 2 cased Mini Drills (one with small variable speed transformer) cost all of two quid, self powered Jigsaw as new for a fiver with large VS transformer also fiver. Many
    sheets
    of veneer at two quid. 100 odd tins of various enamels a fiver and so on - Victory Fireboat a fiver - too many to list...........
    1 month ago by redpmg
    Forum
    Plans for Mississippi paddle Steamer
    Hi Nod, Welcome aboard ๐Ÿ˜Š You can buy a set (10
    sheets
    ) here, ain't cheap though ๐Ÿค” https://www.modelerscentral.com/plans/mantua-ship-plans/ship-model-plans-mississippi/ But probably worth it to get a โ‚ฌ473 kit right! https://www.modelerscentral.com/ship-model-kits/mantua/mississippi-river-steamboat/ Good luck, Doug ๐Ÿ˜Ž
    1 month ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    All the hard work would have now been done, if I had got the waterjets and had finished designing the stern. We will have to wait for that, as well as a delivery of balsa... But I have a couple of spare
    sheets
    of balsa and a few final parts, so I can give you a short sample of how things will go on from here while the machine is cutting them. We want to cut parts out of a 4"x36" balsa sheet so I draw up the boundaries, and fit the parts in at appropriate places (fig36). The sheet is oriented vertically, because that's how my CNC machine wants to see it, and the top right corner is positioned at 0:0, so I know where my origin is. Then I remove all the lines that I don't need to cut. Because I have lined up the long straight edges with the edge of the balsa, I don't need to cut along them. I don't need to cut the boundary lines either - so I have a rather odd drawing for final cutting as at fig37. From now on we don't need to look at any more drawings. I save just the bits I want to cut as a .DXF file - which is a standard CAD drawing format. Then I take this file and input it to a free software package called 'DXF2Gcode'. Which, you will not be surprised to hear, outputs instructions for cutting those lines in G Code, which is a standard language for controlling cutting tools. The language looks like this - my comments in brackets: G90 (Absolute programming) G21 (units in millimeters) G17 (We are working in the XY plane) G40 (Cancel automatic tool radius compensation.) G49 (Cancel tool length compensation.) G28 (go to the pre-programmed Zero position directly over the balsa sheet) G92 x0y0z0 (Set this position to Origin Zero. All distances will now be measured from here) G0 Z -10.000 (drop the cutting tool to height -10mm - just above the balsa) (*** LAYER: Layer1 ***) (* SHAPE Nr: 2 *) G0 X +0.000 Y -68.551 (go to the first place to start cutting) F60 (set the feed rate to 60) G1 Z -15.400 (drop the cutting tool through the z axis to height -15.4 - this cuts almost completely through the balsa, leaving just a thin web underneath to hold the part in place) G1 X -25.258 Y -68.525 (Move the cutting tool along the x,y axis to cut the first line) G1 X -25.255 Y -65.350 (Move the cutting tool along the x,y axis to cut the second line line) G1 X +0.000 Y -65.350 (Move the cutting tool along the x,y axis to cut the third line) G1 Z -10.000 (raise the cutting tool along the z axis out of the balsa) You can easily learn the basic commands - but you don't need to as DXF2Gcode just creates a working cutting file for you. Next, you put some balsa in the machine, turn it on and send the G Code commands to it. This is done with another free software package called 'G Code Sender'. The names are quite descriptive! I enclose some photos of what happens next, and a 'media file' (video) which, as you know, you download by clicking on it, and then clicking on the miniature little blue square on the top left of the screen. As you can see, there is very little dust with a thin cutting tool, and the sound from a 12v motor running at 10v is low. This was recorded with a camera within a foot of the cutting tool... After that, it's just an evening of taking the parts out of the balsa
    sheets
    , assembling them and gluing up...
    1 month ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    Now we are on the home straight! We have a drawing, a reasonable structure, and we can start pulling out the detail. It's at this stage that I usually confuse myself completely, since I will make numerous slight alterations to put bulkheads and formers in better positions for several reasons - internal layout, better strength and balance.... and I end up with several dozen slightly different hull designs, each of which are slightly incompatible with numerous slightly different bulkheads, and I then lose track of which parts go with which others... However, here are some examples of the output from this stage. The superstructure base(fig32) is going to have to be made from parts as I mentioned earlier. The bulkheads (fig33) can now all be drawn with their slots and tabs, ready for assembling into the classic egg-box on the sub-deck (fig34). The front formers and the keel are taken off the drawing, again with tabs drawn (fig35)... There will be quite a number of other parts to be drawn and made - the transom and other flat sections of the stern, the triangular bulkheads under the subdeck, the trapezoid plates which go to make up the funnel and mast, and other details like the anchor well. Almost all of these parts will be uninteresting rectangles with dimensions taken off the drawing, so I am not going to list them all down here. The full set of parts, however, will be needed when it comes to the cutting stage, because we will be trying to get as little wastage as possible from the balsa, and sneaking little triangular formers into all available gaps on the
    sheets
    . I will take a bit of a break now, because I need to get the water-jets delivered before doing the final stern design - and I am running short of balsa, so I will need more of that! I may cut a few parts on a sheet of 1/8" inch as an illustration. To do this you simply arrange the parts you want into a 4"x36" rectangle, load the cutter with a 4"x35" balsa sheet and send a file describing the parts to the cutter over a USB link. We will cover the software used and the stages of converting the drawing file to cutting instructions at that point...
    1 month ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    A little aside now, for the superstructure. We can now draw a bit more detail on the superstructure, and shift it onto the hull to check how large an access cavity we have. If it looks too small we can always use part of the deck, but this looks as if it should be big enough. See fig27. I still don't know how I will hold it on - magnets perhaps, with a locating dowel? Then we start measuring in just the same way as we did the bulkheads - base and height. This will give us the angles at which the superstructure walls are placed - most boats have these vertically upwards! Fig28 shows the cross-sections of the superstructure at 4 places, where the joints are. Now we have a base shape and a top shape - we can draw these in as fig29. The vertical lines mark where the walls change their angle - these have to be in line top and bottom. How easy to check with a CAD package! Imagine the superstructure base and top - held apart by those cross-sections. measuring on the diagonal line gives us the shape and size of the
    sheets
    which will be needed to cover it. Here they are drawn as fig30. Finally, we have the roof with the bridge wings, and the upper roof of the bridge proper. They are drawn out as fig31, and immediately you can see that they are too big to be made from a 4" wide sheet of balsa. We may need to add parts on - or make them from plasticard? The base is also too big for a single sheet - that will need building in parts... I still need to think about the actual construction, but now I have the shapes I can work out how they will be assembled and attached to the hull...
    1 month ago by DodgyGeezer
    Response
    Re: What filler?
    Hello Colin, the bow and stern are each made up from 7x 19mm thick balsa sections sandwiched together, glued and dowelled to the main hull, which is made up from 3x 3/8
    sheets
    . The sanding is going well however i just want to make the finish a little better. Not looking for a 'as new' overall finish as it was a working barge so i guess that it was knocked around a bit in its time! regards chris
    1 month ago by oscartrain
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    We just need to draw the superstructure and bulkheads, and then we can start estimating how much balsa will be needed. Next, arrange the lines to fit on the
    sheets
    with minimum wastage, and point the output at a CNC machine. Then all you have to do is glue it together and paint...
    1 month ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    EeZeBilts From Keil Kraft
    For a simpler hull I would have done all the hard work now - for this one I might need to go back and start from the beginning if I find it doesn't work..... But anyway, here is the next instalment. From the plan and elevation views (fig20) I can take all the data about where the
    sheets
    cross, and where tabs may need to be put in. These are then marked and the egg-box structure (fig21) is just taken away. Easy to do this with a drawing package! So we are left with cutting lines for the top deck (fig22), the sides of the internal box (fig23) and the sub-deck (fig24). The decks are made with two balsa
    sheets
    to obtain the width. I have included a rear bulkhead (fig25) and a front former (fig26) to illustrate where these will go. Note that we now have much of the hull shape, and we haven't even specified the keel (which will need a few more tab cutouts from the sub-deck). For eezebilts the keel is often made in two parts - above the sub-deck and below. I am expecting assembly to follow this route: 1 - add bulkheads and box sides to subdeck. 2 - when glued, add front formers and keel top, and bend bow up. 3 - when glued, turn over and add keel bottom and bottom formers. Since the keel is not relied upon to add a lot of strength, it could just be a single sheet of 1/8" balsa. But I note that Martin used multiple
    sheets
    of plasticard to build his keel, and am wondering whether two bits of 1/8" should be glued together... Another thing we do at this point is check that the measurements of any large items don't exceed the maximum size of a sheet of balsa. And we can do a bit of thinking about where each item will come from - slight size adjustments might mean that we have less wastage when it comes to cutting... P.S. - actually, two pairs of centre tabs are not going to be needed, since those bulkheads will just be connected straight to the outside of the box and there need be no internal division. It's slips like this that make me end up putting out incorrect plans... ๐Ÿ˜ญ
    1 month ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Transport System for model boats
    Yes - you use washers. Just one needed at the rear, because a pop rivet already has a rim. This is a common technique. Pick a light rivet and it won't compress the plastic much. For the handle bolts I use a little 4mm spacer, as the web page shows. I use these for EeZeBilts, which are typically light - but the biggest one I have carries nearly 20kg, with spare batteries and radio and everything inside. A kid can sit on them - indeed, I have done so on occasions. You use the 4mm thickness, but if you really want to use them as seats you would probably be better off with 6mm. Of course, if you wish you can build a wooden frame inside if you want to carry something really heavy. What I like is the cost. You can get 5
    sheets
    of 8ftx4ft on ebay for less than ยฃ50 - that's ยฃ10 per sheet with free delivery. If you go to your nearest stockist (look for 'twinflute') and carry them away they will probably be ยฃ5 per sheet. And you can typically get 4 boxes out of a sheet. The cost of a strap handle and some clasps is minimal (a few quid on ebay), so you are looking at a custom-sized box for a fiver or less. Means that you can box ALL your boats at low cost, and then stack them away under beds or out in the shed. I must have a dozen or so of these piled on top of each other... and they are very light, so you are not carrying any extra weight apart from the boat... Incidentally, I've standardised on these toggle clips - they seem to work the best... https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Case-Box-Stainless-Steel-Spring-Loaded-Toggle-Latch-Catch-Clip-6pcs-Y6U9/323801617239?hash=item4b64149357:g:3S0AAOSwhMJc004r
    2 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    46'' RAF Crash Tender
    John B Not sure if this clip helps you or not, what ever it is worth a look. If there is not room for that, even if you lengthened the centre shaft to bring the outboard motors nearer the centre line. Then what about this thought. UK supplier Cornwall Model Boats and others do gear packs. If you can get 1:1 gear sets. mount between two perspex
    sheets
    with suitable bearings to form a dropped drive line with input and out put on the same side. Make two units and mount on port and starboard shafts with the motors aft, over the shafts. If you are short of width angle the gear sets inwards at the top to bring the motors closer. Then just mount the centre motor direct on the end of the centre shaft in the conventional way, With a bit of luck and good model engineering all three motors will be accessible through the same aperture. Just a thought for you. It of course could be totally wrong too!
    2 months ago by ikseno99
    Forum
    Where are they?
    Spent at least three hours searching for
    sheets
    for the orbital sander today - still not found - but discovered unused detail sander in a very odd place (under the kitchen sink) - used that - does a better job on our hardwood trophy plaques. Bought from Woolworths just before they closed down on sale for next to nothing - sad........ Best one ex managed - lost her car keys - turned up a day later in the freezer section of the fridge......... the remote a bit iffy after that.
    2 months ago by redpmg
    Forum
    Pond Weed
    Thanks for posting about pond weed control. Biological Control .. best seems to be Grass Carp reported to eat the weeds, we are still investigating. Chemical Control... not allowed to use herbicide as our pond is linked to the River Itchen. However we do use Barley straw extract to control algae. Mechanical Control ... motorised cutters etc are far to expensive and you still have to rake up the cut weeds. In the end throwing a rake out or placed behind roots by guy in a boat and pulling it in is the best solution for us, so far. one in the boat, two each with a rake and barrow. we cut and collected barrow fulls. We continue to use Pond Dye (see biofix and dyofix.co.uk) other shading can be obtained by planting willow trees. Weighted black polythene
    sheets
    for 6 months at a time has been suggested as has solar powered fountain or air pumping air bubbles as this reduces infestations and oxygenates the water. Regards, Tall Paul.
    2 months ago by Tall Paul
    Forum
    Martin Westquay's Piper Cub ;-)
    Hi Doug - are those printwood
    sheets
    in the kit ? Must be a very old one
    2 months ago by redpmg
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    "....I am sure that you will end up with a lot of customers when see these...." While it is, of course, quite reasonable to charge for materials and time, I am looking forward to a future where the base patterns for a model boat kit will be available for free off the Web. You can download a lot of free patterns already, but I haven't seen anything I would call a 'real boat kit'. CNC cutters and 3-D printers are already available at most schools, and local councils now operate 'MakerSpace' workshops where this kit is made available to the public. Hobbyist designers could turn out the cutting files - all a modeller would need to do would be to buy the
    sheets
    of wood and feed them into the machine to have a kit coming out the other side. Not too sure how to do fibreglass hulls, though...
    3 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Blog
    40'' Seaplane Tender, new build K
    Deck is now on and trimmed and chine spray rails and gunwale rubbing strip are on. Will be making the toe rails next and a few tweaks here and there, and inside edge of deck trimming to balsa facings (to be fixed) before undercoating. Cabin is a work in progress and still to be 'fitted'to deck ( whole sandpaper
    sheets
    strapped down tight to deck, and cabin placed on top and sanded fore and aft till a good fit) Cabin will fit over an internal coaming/upstand to keep water out. Spray rails and rubbing strip are hard balsa toughened with cyno (toe rails will be the same) Glue for decks was West System 105 resin with 404 powder additive (magic stuff, most widely used epoxy for full sized boats in NZ.)
    3 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Motor identification.
    Wow - that's a bit of a wide requirement! I assume you are having difficulty finding some data? Are we talking I/C motors or electric here? Brushed or brushless? .... If the item has ANY markings you can usually look it up on the Web - though you may need to translate from Chinese. The big companies are easy enough to get English data from, but smaller ones may pose a problem. Recently I had to photograph the characters on a box of hydrometers, get that automatically translated from, I assume, Simplified Chinese, look up the company name in Latin characters, download instruction
    sheets
    with likely pictures attached and then translate those.... A lot of things, including electric motors, are now made in China as 'clones' - that is, as copies of an original design, often sourced from the West, perhaps with a few modifications. Such items often come with very little info from the manufacturer, and may be made as a short run with a 'one-off' badge on them. Under these circumstances the only way you will get information is to have enough experience in the field to be able to recognise the item as being a copy of a known item and work from there. Often specialist forums have people who can help you here...
    3 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    Hintsand tips - Decals made easy
    If anyone is looking for a cheap easy way to make any decals of photos name plates, designs etc, here is an idea you might find useful. I use a waterslide decal paper on which you can print anything you design, draw etc on your inkjet printer. I buy this paper from a company in Australia for around $30 NZ for 10 A4
    sheets
    . You can buy clear or white. What you do is just print your design, photo, text etc onto the paper (plastic waterslide coated), let the ink dry, spray with either a clear lacquer or Helmar clear (the best), allow to dry, trim,soak in warm water as usual and apply. This material is quite tough and will not tear easily and you can spray lacquer over it to seal it on the model. It is a similar stuff as sold by Testors in a kit but is a lot more cost effective. I've included some examples of decals I've made for my boats and planes . For small decals you can cut a small piece a bit bigger than your design, print your picture on A4 to see where it will come on the page, sellotape the piece of decal paper over the print, (tape horizontally top and bottom) put the page back in the printer with the same orientation as is was, and print onto your decal. This saves wasting a whole sheet of decal paper which cannot be re used. If you find a nice clear sharp design it will come out nicely on the decal
    3 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Hintsand tips - Decals made easy
    Is that 321 new P for 20
    sheets
    (assuming it's not just for 1) if so not too bad, about the same as mine from Aussie.
    3 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    Hintsand tips - Decals made easy
    Hi C-H, had a look at that site thanks, and they don't do too bad a job by the looks of it. I still prefer to do my own as for $30 I can make hundreds of decals (depending on size) from 10 A4
    sheets
    . Looks like they do pretty much the same thing as I can do but just on sticky backed vinyl. They still need to be sealed as well by the looks of it to water / fuel proof them. Some of my planes fly at up to 100 MPH so these decals once sealed hang on pretty well as do the ones on the boats. As I mentioned previously about having to wait, Callies say up to a month for a custom decal ? Also, as they mentioned, the better the pic you send them the better the result, which is what I said earlier, doing it the way I do. Either way, if it works, you make it yourself or have someone do it, its how the model looks in the end that counts.
    3 months ago by jbkiwi
    Response
    Re: 40'' Seaplane Tender, new build F
    Thanks Martin, I find that if your framing is ok, and you use medium balsa (plank grain lengthways, you seem to come out with a much truer shape to f/glass than trying to torture
    sheets
    of balsa or ply round corners, (pretty much do it the same as a 100% boat and you can't go too far wrong) Managed to bring the chine down at the bow using filler (which took the most time) I'll re-do the frame patterns to fix this problem and do a few other dimension changes and frame positions in case anyone else might want to have a crack at this boat, once I've sorted everything out. I'll try and do it so I can email 100% frame outlines etc plus a bit of info to enable anyone with a bit of modelling skill to knock up a hull. As I said before, I'm making this up as I go along so it won't be perfect, but at least it should be a reasonable 'stand off' (long way off) scale model.๐Ÿ˜‚ Glassing is the fun easy bit! (check out my last 100% big glassing job on my 12ft 70s racing dinghy) I enjoy glassing, as it means you are sealing in all the hard work you've put in to building, repairing, restoring etc and it's going to be there for years to come.
    3 months ago by jbkiwi
    Forum
    AERKITS SOLENT LIFEBOAT
    Hi, I have found this on the net. Send an email to the engineering secretary at the RNLI as they sell a set for the Solent (three
    sheets
    @ approx ยฃ6 a sheet including postage. mailto:louise_chapman@rnli.org.uk Louise is always ready and willing to help modelers in any way she can. The RNLI needs all the help and funds it can get to continue its great work at sea. Hope this helps. Martin.
    3 months ago by Martin555
    Forum
    Joining ply hull sides
    Hi there, Somewhere - in the UK - you can purchase 8 ft x 4ft
    sheets
    of 2 mm birch plywood. I know because I bought some for a model shop in Whitburn, Tyne and Wear a while ago - they cut if from an 8ft x 4ft for me - but the problem in now the shop in Whitburn has now closed down. I have been doing a bit of web search and I have come across this link but it seems it will only sell to the industry. If you contact them they may be able to let you know who they supply too. https://www.specialisedpanels.co.uk/birch-plywood.html Or they may even sell it to you - good luck. When I was joining plywoods on real boats we used to feather them (taper them) but you wont be able to do that with 2mm thick ply. So, as suggested above, may be the best option. John
    4 months ago by JOHN
    Forum
    Hints and Tips.
    Mate, too many years in salt water . Tips? the secret? I really paint all my wood models so thoroughly and make internal wood coamings inside of the superstructures and actually hose down first thing at home with a soft hose stream to wash off salt. Most of my hulls and decks when the model is finished have been "painted" local hardware paint or sprayed with fibreglass resin thinned down about 50% or so on paint varnished wood ( even polyurethane 50% thinned ) of which BOTH are so clear and some models over 30/35 ( i/c and steam ) years are still impervious to attack and a bit bullet proof and every so often I do a clean down with say a household (any brand will do) kitchen bench type of cleaner, supermarket spray mist cleaner , you know the ones that smell so fresh and clean that they kill ONLY 99% of all germs and baddies ( what a crock ) and I then take the model/ bits onto the grass still smelling so fresh (UGH) and gently wash away the germs and baddies and just sun dry for a bit and put back in the shed for another day. I am so petty, I also save up the dry cleaning flimsy plastic
    sheets
    and cut the sides so I have a long sheet to drape over each model till the next run the sawdust of other shed jobs does NOT get on the model. I fold the
    sheets
    off with the dust side to the inner fold , hoping I do not forget which side is which ( I think I am getting OLDER )before I check out the model (radio test, fuel ok , just lightly SINGER oil carburettor shaft , rudder post prop shaft bits , check the glow plug works, inline fuel filter is clean , AND AND leave my engine settings alone year after year AND try to exactly mix the same fuel blend over and over by careful measure but you can slop a tad more oil in as *Oil is CHEAPER than steel , if a bit rich then one click on the needle yet my mates rib me as I leave it *ALONE ). I always check, ALWAYS on the day BEFORE next days run and avoid things that go wrong at the pond side , ( you know the guy who glitches and bleats it was going so well last time ) as I am in OPEN waters I do not chance fails. Regards and good boating Lyle from Oz.
    4 months ago by Lyle
    Forum
    Look for a simple balsa build
    "........I have found that most old hand drawn plans are inaccurate......." I bow to your experience, of course! My rather more limited exposure to vintage model plans is that they are indeed inaccurate. Your points are all true, and on top of that wood and paper can shrink and warp over the years. I handled that on the initial EeZeBilts by providing a copy of the die-cut
    sheets
    as well as the 'improved' cutting lines, which were 'what I thought the designer meant'. It was still hard to be sure that I had got things right, because manual cutting from plans introduces more errors - but now that I have a cutting machine that source of errors should be minimised. I originally thought that PDF format was a good one to use for distribution, since it was meant to be a 'facsimile image' - but I didn't realise that people can set their printers up to do all sorts of default formatting, which can alter sizes...
    5 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Ah well, grandmothers and eggs... ๐Ÿ˜Œ Still, I did say that the collet was cheaper than 1 grubscrew - not 100... I found that mine worked first time, so you probably won't need the platform. You seem better equipped than I am for the rest of it ๐Ÿ˜‰ I can, however, report that holding balsa sheet in this way is very effective. It is a sheet of ply bolted to the base, with another sheet of ply 4" wide on top. The sides have hard balsa edges rising about 1/4 inch above the ply, which are held in with a spruce strip. A 4" sheet of yellow correx is there to provide a soft base for under cutting. If I cut outside the workpiece the cutter just goes through the balsa sides, so no damage done. 4" or 100mm
    sheets
    of balsa drop into the 1/8th recess on top, and are held by the side balsa, which is slightly sprung inwards. If necessary they can be packed around the edges, but the recess is sized to hold them tightly. They are firmly held against the cutter, do not move at all, and the workpiece can be removed and replaced precisely in the same position if necessary. If you want you can put a weight on top of the sheet during cutting to hold it perfectly flat, and move it when the cutter is going to go over it.
    5 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Having successfully used the machine to make the workholding support for the wood
    sheets
    , I started on the final leg - getting the machine to actually produce parts for a model boat. It's just going to be used for EeZeBilt balsa parts initially, until I understand a bit more about cutting tools and feed rates. I'm not using a 'professional' spindle motor (which can cost well north of ยฃ100), but just an old model boat motor with a cheap Chinese chuck and milling head. You can see a couple of examples in the pictures below. The first material I tried to cut was cardboard. I wanted something really weak, because the cutting tools are very narrow, and I did not know how much sideways force they would take. Turned out fine, though. Further pictures show the first attempt at cutting balsa sheet, a whole sheet of 1/8 balsa being cut, and a couple of parts which have just been cut. Points to make: 1 - you need a high RPM from the cutting motor if you want a fast feed speed. Boat motors work, but a high speed brushless would be better. As it is the edges of the balsa are a bit ragged... 2 - Probably the best way to keep all the parts in the balsa sheet is not to use tabs, but just to cut 90% of the way through. I left about 5 thou on the balsa part, which meant it stayed in place but could easily be pushed out... 3 - you need a soft surface under the balsa sheet in case you do cut deeper by mistake. I thought of felt but that gets caught up in the blade too easily. You could use another balsa sheet, but I used a bit of Correx. Depron would be fine... So there we are. I have now cut a complete kit out of balsa and will start to make it up. I can recommend this machine if you want to just sit and have a beer while all the hard work of cutting parts is done for you...!
    5 months ago by DodgyGeezer
    Blog
    Hull Paint job complete
    So.... Patience is not one of my strong points and paint spraying is definately not. I don't have the facilities or the right equipment to create a first class excellent paint job, so this part of the build was always going to be a challeng and it proved to be right. the first primer layer went on great and it looked good, followed by a layer of brilliant appliance white from a large can from my local Halfords.....all looked perfect. Then came the masking and application of the Capri Blue hull and pinstriping at deck level. Well, this didn't go great as I couldn't get the hull line correct as it shows on real life Huntsmans or the instruction sheet. In addition, the Frog tape I used, lifted in places over the hull stringers and was a real mess......it had to come off! A re-application of primer and white gloss coat followed, and with more patience than I thought I had, managed to mask up again for the Blue Hull. I learnt from the first mistake and made sure that the stirngers were masked on all sides first, then added a solid masking strip all the way down the hull. Although not perfect the results can be see here in the pictures. I decided that I'd add a couple of layers of Halfords clear laquer to finish of the paint job to create a tough, clear, glossy finish, but before this decided to name the boat by using lettraset. Here I learnt a second and third valuable lesson.....make sure the paint is completely dry first and also don't spray too much laquer in one place......it makes the paint run into the laquer!!! The results can be seen on the bow. Oh well, I tried my best and not going to re-do it now. So, Rosalie hull is now painted and its time to do the decking. For this I am going to use thin
    sheets
    of mahogany. They were not provided as part of the kit so had to appeal to SLEC who kindly sent me two
    sheets
    of mahogany for this purpose. Thank you SLEC for being understanding that a "Kit" should contain all that's necessary to build it and not have to go and find more pieces to buy. Judge the paint job for yourself and don't be tooo critical as its only my second boat build.๐Ÿ˜‹
    6 months ago by StuartE
    Forum
    Transmitter Mode 2
    Newbie question. I am going to buy a FlySky FS-i6 and want a spring loaded throttle on left and spring loaded rudder on right. Do I get this if I buy mode 2. ie will it be spring loaded. Chose this brand as I understand it and use it on my sailboat. My sailboat transmitter is not spring loaded on left as it pulls the
    sheets
    on and is then left alone.
    6 months ago by juskiddin
    Blog
    Flying Scotsman. Iron paddle tug
    This is a scratch build using plans from Brown,Son &Ferguson Ltd. plans come on three A1
    sheets
    which include hull profiles, plan and elevation views, and details of two types of paddles. A straight forward one and paddles fitted which an excentric mechanism. The latter is supposed to be the most efficient with the paddles turned to maintain max area to the water. While researching found this web site with more detail. However the text is in German but it has loads of detailed drawings in PDF format. http://www.john-tom.com/RcShip/Strongbow%20Paddle%20Steamer/StrongbowPlansComplete.pdf Research showed that lots of these tugs were built in the late 1800, using the same design. My build was named because it was one of the last built for a Glasgow shipping company. Taken from tynetugs web site Name: FLYING SCOTSMAN Launched: 12/09/1898 Completed: 1898 Builder: JP Rennoldson & Sons, South Shields Yard Number: 188 Dimensions: 177grt, 29nrt, 118.0 x 20.1 x 10.1ft Engines: SL1cyl (38.25 x 56ins), 90nhp, 400ihp Engines By: JP Rennoldson & Sons, South Shields Propulsion: Paddle Construction: Iron Reg Number: 108767 History: 1898 Clyde Shipping Co Ltd; registered at Glasgow 13/05/1948 Christopher & Richard Jennings, London; renamed CAMBRIAN 16/01/1951 Broken up Comments: Last paddle tug built for the Clyde Shipping Co 1898: Cost ยฃ4650 25/08/1939 to 16/10/1939: On War Department service 13/05/1948: Sold for conversion to a yacht. Subsequently abandoned at Oban 16/01/1951: Arrived at Troon for breaking up
    6 months ago by Hillro
    Forum
    Display cases
    Hi Just been sourcing an array of display cabinet impossible cost ,can be more than the model. So dug arround in my old data
    sheets
    from a few years ago and found laminating
    sheets
    ! Basically using A3 laminator run the sheet through once soft let cool and floppy run a second time it when cool is harder put through 3rd time when cool itโ€™s harder and clearer almost like glass ? ( you MUST lay on flat surface each time or will distort) Hope this helps Dave
    6 months ago by Ravydave52


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