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    Forum
    Look for a simple balsa build
    "........I have found that most old hand drawn plans are inaccurate......." I bow to your experience, of course! My rather more limited exposure to vintage model plans is that they are indeed inaccurate. Your points are all true, and on top of that wood and paper can shrink and warp over the years. I handled that on the initial EeZeBilts by providing a copy of the die-cut
    sheets
    as well as the 'improved' cutting lines, which were 'what I thought the designer meant'. It was still hard to be sure that I had got things right, because manual cutting from plans introduces more errors - but now that I have a cutting machine that source of errors should be minimised. I originally thought that PDF format was a good one to use for distribution, since it was meant to be a 'facsimile image' - but I didn't realise that people can set their printers up to do all sorts of default formatting, which can alter sizes...
    1 month ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Ah well, grandmothers and eggs... 😌 Still, I did say that the collet was cheaper than 1 grubscrew - not 100... I found that mine worked first time, so you probably won't need the platform. You seem better equipped than I am for the rest of it πŸ˜‰ I can, however, report that holding balsa sheet in this way is very effective. It is a sheet of ply bolted to the base, with another sheet of ply 4" wide on top. The sides have hard balsa edges rising about 1/4 inch above the ply, which are held in with a spruce strip. A 4" sheet of yellow correx is there to provide a soft base for under cutting. If I cut outside the workpiece the cutter just goes through the balsa sides, so no damage done. 4" or 100mm
    sheets
    of balsa drop into the 1/8th recess on top, and are held by the side balsa, which is slightly sprung inwards. If necessary they can be packed around the edges, but the recess is sized to hold them tightly. They are firmly held against the cutter, do not move at all, and the workpiece can be removed and replaced precisely in the same position if necessary. If you want you can put a weight on top of the sheet during cutting to hold it perfectly flat, and move it when the cutter is going to go over it.
    1 month ago by DodgyGeezer
    Forum
    CNC boat kits...?
    Having successfully used the machine to make the workholding support for the wood
    sheets
    , I started on the final leg - getting the machine to actually produce parts for a model boat. It's just going to be used for EeZeBilt balsa parts initially, until I understand a bit more about cutting tools and feed rates. I'm not using a 'professional' spindle motor (which can cost well north of Β£100), but just an old model boat motor with a cheap Chinese chuck and milling head. You can see a couple of examples in the pictures below. The first material I tried to cut was cardboard. I wanted something really weak, because the cutting tools are very narrow, and I did not know how much sideways force they would take. Turned out fine, though. Further pictures show the first attempt at cutting balsa sheet, a whole sheet of 1/8 balsa being cut, and a couple of parts which have just been cut. Points to make: 1 - you need a high RPM from the cutting motor if you want a fast feed speed. Boat motors work, but a high speed brushless would be better. As it is the edges of the balsa are a bit ragged... 2 - Probably the best way to keep all the parts in the balsa sheet is not to use tabs, but just to cut 90% of the way through. I left about 5 thou on the balsa part, which meant it stayed in place but could easily be pushed out... 3 - you need a soft surface under the balsa sheet in case you do cut deeper by mistake. I thought of felt but that gets caught up in the blade too easily. You could use another balsa sheet, but I used a bit of Correx. Depron would be fine... So there we are. I have now cut a complete kit out of balsa and will start to make it up. I can recommend this machine if you want to just sit and have a beer while all the hard work of cutting parts is done for you...!
    1 month ago by DodgyGeezer
    Blog
    Hull Paint job complete
    So.... Patience is not one of my strong points and paint spraying is definately not. I don't have the facilities or the right equipment to create a first class excellent paint job, so this part of the build was always going to be a challeng and it proved to be right. the first primer layer went on great and it looked good, followed by a layer of brilliant appliance white from a large can from my local Halfords.....all looked perfect. Then came the masking and application of the Capri Blue hull and pinstriping at deck level. Well, this didn't go great as I couldn't get the hull line correct as it shows on real life Huntsmans or the instruction sheet. In addition, the Frog tape I used, lifted in places over the hull stringers and was a real mess......it had to come off! A re-application of primer and white gloss coat followed, and with more patience than I thought I had, managed to mask up again for the Blue Hull. I learnt from the first mistake and made sure that the stirngers were masked on all sides first, then added a solid masking strip all the way down the hull. Although not perfect the results can be see here in the pictures. I decided that I'd add a couple of layers of Halfords clear laquer to finish of the paint job to create a tough, clear, glossy finish, but before this decided to name the boat by using lettraset. Here I learnt a second and third valuable lesson.....make sure the paint is completely dry first and also don't spray too much laquer in one place......it makes the paint run into the laquer!!! The results can be seen on the bow. Oh well, I tried my best and not going to re-do it now. So, Rosalie hull is now painted and its time to do the decking. For this I am going to use thin
    sheets
    of mahogany. They were not provided as part of the kit so had to appeal to SLEC who kindly sent me two
    sheets
    of mahogany for this purpose. Thank you SLEC for being understanding that a "Kit" should contain all that's necessary to build it and not have to go and find more pieces to buy. Judge the paint job for yourself and don't be tooo critical as its only my second boat build.πŸ˜‹
    2 months ago by StuartE
    Forum
    Transmitter Mode 2
    Newbie question. I am going to buy a FlySky FS-i6 and want a spring loaded throttle on left and spring loaded rudder on right. Do I get this if I buy mode 2. ie will it be spring loaded. Chose this brand as I understand it and use it on my sailboat. My sailboat transmitter is not spring loaded on left as it pulls the
    sheets
    on and is then left alone.
    2 months ago by juskiddin
    Blog
    Flying Scotsman. Iron paddle tug
    This is a scratch build using plans from Brown,Son &Ferguson Ltd. plans come on three A1
    sheets
    which include hull profiles, plan and elevation views, and details of two types of paddles. A straight forward one and paddles fitted which an excentric mechanism. The latter is supposed to be the most efficient with the paddles turned to maintain max area to the water. While researching found this web site with more detail. However the text is in German but it has loads of detailed drawings in PDF format. http://www.john-tom.com/RcShip/Strongbow%20Paddle%20Steamer/StrongbowPlansComplete.pdf Research showed that lots of these tugs were built in the late 1800, using the same design. My build was named because it was one of the last built for a Glasgow shipping company. Taken from tynetugs web site Name: FLYING SCOTSMAN Launched: 12/09/1898 Completed: 1898 Builder: JP Rennoldson & Sons, South Shields Yard Number: 188 Dimensions: 177grt, 29nrt, 118.0 x 20.1 x 10.1ft Engines: SL1cyl (38.25 x 56ins), 90nhp, 400ihp Engines By: JP Rennoldson & Sons, South Shields Propulsion: Paddle Construction: Iron Reg Number: 108767 History: 1898 Clyde Shipping Co Ltd; registered at Glasgow 13/05/1948 Christopher & Richard Jennings, London; renamed CAMBRIAN 16/01/1951 Broken up Comments: Last paddle tug built for the Clyde Shipping Co 1898: Cost Β£4650 25/08/1939 to 16/10/1939: On War Department service 13/05/1948: Sold for conversion to a yacht. Subsequently abandoned at Oban 16/01/1951: Arrived at Troon for breaking up
    2 months ago by Hillro
    Forum
    Display cases
    Hi Just been sourcing an array of display cabinet impossible cost ,can be more than the model. So dug arround in my old data
    sheets
    from a few years ago and found laminating
    sheets
    ! Basically using A3 laminator run the sheet through once soft let cool and floppy run a second time it when cool is harder put through 3rd time when cool it’s harder and clearer almost like glass ? ( you MUST lay on flat surface each time or will distort) Hope this helps Dave
    2 months ago by Ravydave52


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