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    Blog
    36'' Thames River Police Launch by Robbob
    After the successful build of the β€˜Vintage Model Works’ RAF Crash Rescue Tender I was asked by Mike Cummings of VMW if I would undertake to build a prototype of their new model with the aim of checking the construction method and the assembly instructions for accuracy before the kit is put into production. The model is a β€˜Thames River Police Launch’ and is based on the original design by Phil Smith for the Veron company, this was a very popular model kit in the late 50’s and 60’s and sold for the princely sum of 43 shillings and tuppence, approximately Β£2.15 in today’s money but an equivalent cost of Β£48.50 in 1960. This design has been updated to accommodate electric propulsion and radio control by Colin Smith, the son of the original designer and it has been re-scaled to be 36” in length where the original was 24” which gives much more scope for detailing and provides more β€˜hiding room’ for the drive, control systems and all the associated wiring. The kit produced by VMW uses the same construction techniques as the original and the materials are a combination of balsa and plywood both of which a laser and CNC cut for precision. The ply and balsa materials supplied are of very high quality as one would expect from VMW and all the stripwood for the chines, rubbing strakes and deck detailing is included, even the dowel required for the mast is in the box, very comprehensive! The kit also includes white metal fittings such as the fairleads and
    stanchions
    , and the searchlight and horns. The glazing for the windows comes in the kit too. The instruction sheet supplied is in need of revision as it is largely taken directly from the original as written by Phil Smith and some of the terminology needs updating, for instance the ply bottom and side skins are referred to as β€˜strakes’ but I understand that a re-write of the instructions is in hand along with an updated plan showing the best positioning for the motor, prop-shaft, battery, ESC, receiver, rudder and servo. During construction I have added a few additional pieces of ply or balsa as reinforcement or supports and substituted some balsa parts for ply where I thought a stronger material would be better. I also added some hatches to give access to the wiring at the bow and the rudder & servo at the stern but largely I have not gone β€˜off plan’ to any extent. The pictures show the model in it’s present state (Nov 2018) and is ready for painting and finishing.
    2 years ago by robbob
    Forum
    Folding Bulwark????!
    Hello John Thank you again. I did appreciate seeing the earlier picture with a different style of opening. The latest image is a delightful period photo is it not. Beautifully lit and good colour with interesting detail. John, re your view of bulwark hinging would you do me a favour and be kind enough to make a sketch of what you say in order that I might visualise more clearly where and how the fixings would look. From such I would be able to fashion something. Also, with regard to removable railings when they are in situ, how are they locked or kept in place or do they just rely simply on long stemmed
    stanchions
    going in to the deck and the weight of the railings to keep in situ. T
    1 year ago by Toby
    Blog
    Railings
    Last night I had done a quick railing mockup as seen in the first three photos. Decided to go with styrene and use a rectangular
    stanchions
    (verticals) and top handrail along with horizontal round intermediates. Drilled holes through the verticals and inserted the round rods, then glued. Worked pretty well. Next few shots show how I typically sketch up to scale and determine proper spacers, dividers come in handy for this. Then drew some guide lines for assembly, taped it to my tack surface, covered in wax paper and pinned the assemble in place. Pins do not penetrate anything,just uses pressure to secure. Some drops of styrene cement and the parts are welded together. Then on to all the railings needed. Will let dry overnight and trim ends in place. FYI -- Tack surface is just a piece of acoutical ceiling tile, I cut down the 2'x4' size to make smaller ones for my tiny workbench use. I learned this pinning method from building balsa airplanes, comes in handy a lot...... Joe
    2 years ago by Joe727
    Response
    Paint / epoxy work
    Hi Joe, Why not put
    stanchions
    on each corner. And every 1" or so. Go around to the back of the second deck. Put the Pilot House ask flush to the front! Then on the back have a ladder going. Down to the Main deck! Regards, Ed
    2 years ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    Ship rudders
    Mornin' Toby, I'm back😁 Pardon the delay, just finished tidying up the wiring and final running tests on Colin's Taycol Supermarine motor and converter board - to make it run off a standard brushed ESC! The rivets look greatπŸ‘ and the last pic was much better as well😊 Soooo many rivets 😲 guess you have to do them in batches, and then go pull up a tree or something, or you'd go doolally 😑 And I thought I was patient doing all the portholes and
    stanchions
    on my 4' 6" 1936 destroyer - that was ONLY hundreds! Rivets? Didn't even contemplate that!! I think you should continue this in a proper Build Blog - there's lotsa good stuff you're doing hereπŸ‘ And at the end you can make a pdf file of the whole story with just a few clicksπŸ˜‰ Be a nice mementoπŸ‘ Look forward to the Launch Report. During my career I attended the launches of several naval ships I had worked on,designing the COMMS systems. The funniest one was a glass fibre minehunter at the intermarine yard in italy near La Spezia. The ship was still in dry dock, like a huge bath. They turned on the 'taps' and slowly up came the ship! Keep up the good work, cheers, Doug 😎 BTW; were you sitting on the saw to help keep awake? 😁😁
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    PS Waverley
    real gentleman who started selling timbers for modelmakers, but had to stop that as he got a sensitivity to the dust of woods, but he also had a range of amazingly good stuff for amazingly low prices, including various
    stanchions
    . I bought all the remaining portholes from him because I hate glazing portholes! I have tiny working compasses, rigging scissors, tiny woodscrews, rigging cord, bottle screws, all sorts from him and all cost me very little. Alas, health issues have caused him to cease trading and he has been flogging of his stock on ebay. A great loss. Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Forum
    PS Waverley
    Hi Martin, My
    stanchions
    were pre-drilled, from Graupner ca 30 Years ago. Never 'eard of Modelling Timbers. Timber
    stanchions
    !!!😲 I "only" had to drill the holes in the decks (thought that was what you meant), there were enough of them. Much worse though was fitting all the two part portholes 😑 Since fibre glassing the the hull I have to do that all over again😭 Frankly I think anyone who gets so many
    stanchions
    made as castings without pre-drilled rail holes need his bumps feeling. I thoroughly agree ref mini drills, too easy to snap fine drill bits. πŸ‘ For precision / repetitive drilling I use my Proxxon mini milling machine as a drill press. if I need more than one of something I knock up a simple jig (usually from hardwood taken from demolished old furniture) to hold the work piece in the machine vice attached to the milling machine cross bed. I took the irritating collet fixing off the mill and fitted a real 3 jaw chuck πŸ˜‰ Happy 'Vincenting', All the best, Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    PS Waverley
    Doug I will PM David. Been busy all day dealing with casting problems on the wheels of the Vincent and making dozens of dummy nuts'n'bolts. I would have thought you'd have used Modelling Timbers for pre-drilled
    stanchions
    . His prices were so low, but now, alas, he's gone. I would probably make a little jig to drill the cast
    stanchions
    . I think boredom would set in before I broke a drill, but you're bang on about hand held minidrills. They go too fast and cannot be held really firmly. I use mine for cutting and grinding, shaping and polishing. I have a very small pillar drill with a buggy motor adapted to hold a small Jacobs chuck and run off a variable transformer. Today I drilled 40 1mm holes in the pattern for the Vincent rear wheel to assist the mould maker. All went very well. Cheers, Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Forum
    PS Waverley
    Don't have to imagine it Martin, I know it, from all the
    stanchions
    on my H class destroyer πŸ˜‰ Couldn't get the ship under a pillar drill. Free-handing a Dremel type drill is more likely to bend the bit. Did my destroyer in batches and amused meself with summat else in between . Each to his own, Happy pillaring (never tried drilling a pillar meself 😁) Have you tried PMing david greatbatch to see what he's got plan-wise? Cheers, Doug 😎
    2 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    PS Waverley
    Thanks for the link, Doug. Nice job and lots of people on it. I think my mate is going to do the finish as it is now with grained wood effect superstructure and shit brown vents. He'll probably want me to do a bras pattern for the
    stanchions
    and get them cast by my chap round the corner. I wonder how many half mil. drills he'll break! Cheers, Martin
    2 years ago by Westquay
    Response
    deck planks
    On to the railings. I am using striped electrical wire. Free & easy to solder, and different sizes. The only drawback it is a little soft. The hardest job is getting it straight. This is done in vice & between fingers.( fingers not in vice) I also flatten the
    stanchions
    where rails cross. The long silver is the flagstaff at the bow, half way along the section being made. Held in a jig to solder, saw cut hold
    stanchions
    & nails stretch rails. The tape was to hold rails against
    stanchions
    . This was not needed as I pushed them down with a screwdriver as I removed the soldering iron.
    2 years ago by hammer
    Forum
    Robbe Smaragd
    Have not found your boat images yet................ With mine I am most concerned about the 'weak'
    stanchions
    , the fishing line rails and lack of any 'proper' windows/portholes. I will dig out some images and post them up. Re the RAF 'Tender'. Well wished on me in a way. More of that model on another bit of the site. All the best. NPJ
    2 years ago by NPJ
    Blog
    Rear Cabin construction
    today has seen the rear deck and cabin constructed. I lined the deck piece with some mahogany strip for a neater finish on the edge of the crapy liteply. Construction of the cabin was straight forward, this was followed by shaping, sanding, filling any gaps and a couple of coats of sanding sealer ready for paint. I have also added the railings and
    stanchions
    to the roof of the cabin as a start to the detailing to come. I have ordered a book from Amazon which is a reference book of the Waveney Class lifeboats, so hopefully there will be ample photos for the detailing I hope to add as we go on!
    2 years ago by Skydive130
    Directory
    (Pleasure Craft) Billings Sea King
    Found at a Boot Sale in a sorry state. Retained the 2 Como motors but replaced ESC with Chinese Fan Cooled 320a. Acoms AR-201 Rx, Futaba servo all linked to new old stock Acoms Techniplus Alpha 27mhz Tx. New rudder, original propshaft with new couplings. Hull painted in Hammerite Gold and Plastikote white. Retained orignal Billings decals. New
    stanchions
    and rails. Re-veneered deck and added some fancy balsa work. Plains well after contra-rotating the props. (Motor: 2 x Como Drill) (ESC: Chinese 320a Fan cooled) (8/10)
    2 years ago by AllenA
    Forum
    Graupner Elke HF 408
    Elke stripped down, cleaned and base colours flatted. Hopefully, on the water in about a month. I read somewhere that she, originally, had a 300 motor and with a narrow propshaft gap I am down to a 2mm propshaft, 4mm OD. Looking in my motor box I have a 300 motor with 2:1 gearing set up. Actually fits perfectly as the propshaft has to be low to the keel. I plan to use a 30mm 3 blade propeller, because I have one in my box, and hope, that even though it is slightly big for the motor which is 25mm diameter, I will escape any undesirable consequences. Noticeably, the
    stanchions
    and safety ropes only run along one side of the deck. I assume that this is to facilitate nets being brought in on the open side?
    2 years ago by AllenA
    Blog
    TRIUMPH (CG-52301) USCG Type F MLB
    Laser cut kit from Barracuda RC Boats, N Carolina, USA. Baltic birch plywood false keel, ribs/frames, hull sheathing, deck and cabins. No formal plans; I was able to source a handful of B&W archival photos from the USCG website. Fortunately I was able to procure a motherload of archival photos and a few hard to read layout drawings from Mr. Timothy Dring, LCDR, USN (Ret.). He is co-author of "American Coastal Rescue Craft", which is the "bible" if you will, of such. I do sometimes thank the internet. I am certain that without his assistance, my efforts on this wouldn't have been as enjoyable. The kit was also void of fittings, which I was aware of prior to purchase, so I invested in a 3D printer. That I've used to a limited degree, due to searching for parts in the correct file format is mind-numbing! I have globally sourced fittings; USA, UK, ASIA. As a matter of fact, the searchlights I got from this Model Boat Shop were 3D printed, and I was able to fit 5mm LEDs into them. I'd like to get a couple more and put some superbright 12v LED drone lamps in them for use on my 35" towboat. Many deck fittings are handmade when possible, the cleats and fairleads are from Cornwall Boats, UK. (Very reasonable & diverse source, if you didn't already know.) I try to keep wood natural when detail allows it, as I never have enjoyed painting over natural grain. Her decks are covered with 1/16" scribed basswood sheathing from earthandtree.com, which is normally used for wainscoting dollhouse walls. All my boats that have wood decks are covered with scribed sheathing; I feel it makes 'em look "sexy". Believe it or not, the idea for wainscoting came from finding 3/16" at Hobby Lobby's dollhouse department. A couple of feet x 3.5" was about $16, so I found a less expensive source that also had more selections (earthandtree.com) The rail
    stanchions
    are 3/16" square dowels with 2 corners rounded over on the Dremel router table. Leaving their base square, I fit a square peg into a round hole with no glue to facilitate removal, and also for ease of replacing broken ones, which is inevitable. The rail is 1/16" brass rod that also is readily removable. The stern rail is stationary on the lower half, and the chain & wire
    stanchions
    are removable for towing ops. The deck coamings and knuckle are African mahogany strips, other mahogany accents came from leftovers of a prior build. I also try on all my boats, to incorporate vintage leftover scribed sheathing salvaged from my late Father's builds, so I know he's got a part in my builds. Note-the raised deck section between the aft ladder trunk and towing bit is actually a laminated deckhouse he made for the Frigate Essex. Unfortunately, he was unable to build that kit due to Alzheimer's disease in his latter years. (I blame that mostly on the hazardous fumes from the airplane "dope" & glue he used when building RC planes in the 60s & 70s.) I use polyurethane instead of resin due to COPD, 37 yrs of smoking, I quit 2.5 yrs ago. The driveline consists of: 775 Johnson DC main (3500 RPM@12V), Harbor Models 4mm x 14" shaft w/brass stuffing box, Raboesch 75mm 5-blade brass wheel (not OEM), 5mm U-joint couplers, Dimart 320A fan-cooled ESC. Handmade wooden teardrop rudder on a 3/8" sternpost, 1/4" tiller arm steered by a Halcion sail winch servo and cable system. Flysky 6 channel. The nav lights and other illumination are Lighthouse 9v LEDs, also a GoolRC Receiver controlled flashing blue Law Enforcement light. Obviously, I put the cart before the horse and completed the topsides and below deck before finishing the outer hull, but the Wx and season change dictated such. Can't wait for Spring!
    3 years ago by circle43nautical
    Forum
    How do I make Bow Railings
    HI Grandpa, if you mean the entire pulpit railing from cabin to the bow and round. First measure the deck, marking where each upright will be, the uprights seem to be the same height, so that part is easy, source some 16g welding rod, (stainless will be to difficult to braze) then shape to the size of the deck, try to keep the bends smooth as it may kink. Second. Get a scrap board bit bigger than your deck, mark each stanchion position and drill holes to match, stand the
    stanchions
    in the holes and start to lay the top rail silver solder for strength each stanchion as you get to it, might be easier to work side to side towards the bow, this will stop you burning your fingers!!!! To finish you could have the rails chromed or use a chrome spray paint, can't tell if the rails have feet (small washers) if so add these over the
    stanchions
    before you solder the top rail, they will stop them going too deep into the deck, finally drill and glue the railing into the deck, a sod of a job but the look will enhance your model Hope this helps Mark
    3 years ago by jarvo
    Blog
    wheelhouse
    So whilst the hull saga continues ,thought I would do some work on the wheelhouse deck funnels are the tube that gas welding rods come in ,3D printed the vent cowls long live thingyverse ,the rails are 1.6mild steel gas welding rod and the
    stanchions
    20mm x1.6mm split pins soldered at the joints ,the only colour mentioned in the book was yellow funnels so went for a subtle matt shade rather than bright gloss used the same colour for the vents
    3 years ago by marky
    Response
    Billings Sea King refit
    Unfortunately the
    stanchions
    suffered when the boat was "drowned" in Waste water in the flood and several have broken so will have to replace.
    3 years ago by Wingcoax
    Response
    Billings Sea King refit
    Hi Wingcoax, I found my
    stanchions
    and rails at http://www.modelboatbits.com/ . They were good to deal with and delivered in a couple of days. I spent half an hour on my knees at the boot sale where I bought my Sea King searching through 3 boxes and found most of my external fittings. I will have a look on line to see if I can find a supplier for you. You will be surprised how well the existing
    stanchions
    look when gently redressed with a multi tool wire spindle.
    3 years ago by AllenA
    Blog
    Moving along towards finished!
    After beck paint dried overnight, spent an hour painting the deck boards before alit of masking followed by spray painting the bulwarks. I have installed the
    stanchions
    . Tomorrow will see any areas of touching up required (tip- if using rattlecans, gently spray some into the cap which can then be used for touch ups, clean brush using cellulose thinners) and then final coats of laquer. After all this it will be on with the final fittingbif rope work and s few other bits n bobs
    3 years ago by Skydive130
    Blog
    Bulwarks, bollards, cleats and
    stanchions
    !
    Another good day of detailing before light stopped play! Have now got 3 out oif 4 of the Bulwarks fitted, sanded and sealed ready to prime, will do the last one tomorrow after work. Have also fitted the fore and aft Bollards and side cleats. Have also drilled and test fitted one side of the
    stanchions
    which I am delighted with, really starting to look the part now. So, all thats left now is the final Bulwark, drill for remaining
    stanchions
    then prime and paint the deck, Bulwarks ect. Then final coats of laquer before adding the
    stanchions
    , wash boards and the various rope work, anchor ect. Another week or so inbetween work should see it finished!
    3 years ago by Skydive130
    Response
    stanchions
    a making!
    Those brass screws are tiny and cost a fortune at Β£2.75p for a pack of 10 x 3! That’s the reason I didn’t buy another 3 packs and used 3mm brass tube for the lower railing holes!
    3 years ago by Skydive130
    Response
    stanchions
    a making!
    You could always use aluminium and leave unpainted but difficult the add all the bits although you can get ali solder! Looking good. I turned some brass rod to cap my tubes but I like the idea of brass screws.
    3 years ago by Dave M
    Response
    stanchions
    a making!
    Thanks mark, and yes unfortunately will have to paint them!
    3 years ago by Skydive130
    Response
    stanchions
    a making!
    Nice work ,pity you have to paint them ,or do you ? cheers Marky
    3 years ago by marky
    Blog
    stanchions
    a making!
    Have started to make 30
    stanchions
    from 3mm brass tube. All have a tiny brass screw at the top and a tiny section of 3mm brass tube soldered into a filed groove 35mm down. 4
    stanchions
    either side of the hull have a brass 2mm brass support post. 10 completed 20 to go!
    3 years ago by Skydive130
    Response
    Impatient but hit away with it!
    Good advice mark! I’ve had laquer reactions before and the mess it makes is horrendous! I shall let it harden until tomorrow night before doing anything else to it. in the meantime I can get on with making 30 brass
    stanchions
    !
    3 years ago by Skydive130
    Response
    Superstructure finished!
    Thanks Dave, some helpful info there. Looking at pics of the real thing, it appears that the bulwark fore/aft
    stanchions
    are fitted on top of the bulwarks? However for ease and probably strength most people seem to have fitted the
    stanchions
    to the inside of the bulwarks which is what I will do. As for the washports, I shall replicate those. I plan on leaving my rubbing strake black as the most recent pics of the "Douglas Currie" show it like so. Hull painting starts today then I shall start building the
    stanchions
    at work tonight!
    3 years ago by Skydive130
    Response
    And......!
    Very nice detailing - will be a real eye catcher on the pond. I would be interested to know where you sourced the grab rail
    stanchions
    from. Shaun.
    3 years ago by Flack
    Response
    Added extras
    Many thanks fir your info Shaun, especially on the
    stanchions
    Regards Sy
    3 years ago by Skydive130
    Response
    Added extras
    I have an original Aerokits Solent powered by two Torpedo 800 brushed motors controlled by two Mtronics 25 amp brushed speed controllers. I normally use two 8.4 volt 5000 mah NiMh batteries, although I have also used two 11.i volt Lipo's. The shafts are fitted with 50mm three bladed brass propellers. The boat performs nicely on the water. My
    stanchions
    are home made from 3mm brass rod with holes drilled to take 2mm chain. The
    stanchions
    are 70mm in lenght above the deck with approx 10mm below the deck, the base of the stanchion has a suitable sized brass washer fitted where it passes into the hull, the top of the stanchion is filed to a ronded profile. Shaun
    3 years ago by Flack
    Response
    Added extras
    Hi Skydive I use a couple of Bhuler motors in my Solent so the 600 should be OK with your setup. The Solent was not a fast boat with a max speed of about 10 knots. You will need the battery for ballast. I have a whole series of pics of my model during restoration that I will share over dropbox if you wish. Just send me a pm with your e-mail. My
    stanchions
    were about 2" if I remember correctly. Looking good Dave
    3 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    Soldering 1/12 Scale Brass Railings
    Hi Guys. Progress with my Cygnus Crabber is slow but positive. I am using the old "measure twice cut once" approach to every aspect of the build and picking as many brains and taking valuable advice from people, such as your good selves, as I can ! This is one such occasion. I am fast approaching the task of soldering, which I have never done before. I am making all the steelwork of the boat, i.e.
    stanchions
    , shooting bar, 'A' frame and railings out of brass tube and rod. I have made up a wooden jig to pattern the railings and 'A' frame. I have bought enough brass to afford me some extra for "dummy runs". Now when it come to the actual soldering I see on the market is some solder paste (solder and flux mixed) called "Plumbers Mate", I've watched a couple of videos using this product and it seems as though it would suit a novice like me. The thickest rod I am using is 2mm. Do you think this product suitable and do you have any other views please ? Yours studiously !πŸ˜‰
    3 years ago by Ballast
    Response
    Decks
    Hi Norm, seems ya pays yer money and takes yer choice! Some were recessed, some not. in the early days they were stuck up on
    stanchions
    for the landings. Later leaf springs were set into the deck. See attached pics. #1 HMS Furious 1930. Here is a (longπŸ€”) link where you can find many pics of carrier arrester systems and crash barriers. The barriers were raised on
    stanchions
    and let into the deck when not needed. https://www.google.de/search?q=Aircraft+Carrier+Arrestor+Cables&tbm=isch&imgil=w2jChBz8VS5JPM%253A%253B-9W6BTT6DUl5YM%253Bhttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.navair.navy.mil%25252Fnawcad%25252Flakehurst%25252Fcapabilities.cfm%25253FContentID%2525253DArrestingCableManufacturing%25252526NavlID%2525253DCapabilities%25252526NavgID%2525253DStandard%25252526NavgID2%2525253DCapabilities&source=iu&pf=m&fir=w2jChBz8VS5JPM%253A%252C-9W6BTT6DUl5YM%252C_&usg=__9Fx_XZq9e2OTMcbO8fyJwRMCAsY%3D&biw=1642&bih=939&ved=0ahUKEwimuoKIgPXVAhWFPBQKHb5qAq0QyjcISQ&ei=7nahWaaLHoX5UL7ViegK#imgrc=w2jChBz8VS5JPM: Cheers Doug 😎
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Building a deck
    I began laying the deck on April 5th. it had snowed as recently as the week before, but it finally warmed up enough to use glue. The strips were cut to 6-5/8" length, about 20' in 1:36 scale. I used a black marker on two opposite sides to represent the pitch in the seams. The deck was laid in a 5-plank pattern to mix up the butt-joints as much as I could. My research on her decking found she's had various styles and plank widths over her life. The earliest photo showing her deck that I could find, showed it straight planked with 7 or 8" wide boards based on the number of planks between her waterway and the main hatch coaming. Her waterway logs seem to be placed ON the decking, as there's no margin planks or joggling - even today. The planking was set with gel CA. Gorilla sells it in a nice bottle with a metal pin in the cap to keep the spout open. it would up taking 3 of these bottles to complete the deck. The planks are cut at a 45 on the ends along the fore and aft access hatches, to try and hide this seam as much as possible. Once the deck was down, I scraped it. The glue is more resistant than the basswood is, so sanding would have scalloped the wood between seams. Scraping makes everything level. Some lite sanding, more to polish than remove anything, was done last. I had planned to stain the deck a very light grayish tint, but an active naval vessel gets holy-stoned regularly and wouldn't be gray as the ships that sit at a dock today are. In all it took 455 pieces to complete the deck and there wasn't any scrap longer than 1 inch left over. in all I have 3/4" deck beams, 1/4" plywood, a layer of 4oz cloth and resin, and a 3/16" basswood deck - I don't recall why I designed it so heavy, but it certainly doesn't hurt the model at all, and I think the 3/16" square strip will prove to have been easier to set than the 1/16" x 1/4" planks Pride and Macedonian will get. The deck go a coat of water-based satin poly, and I stared working on hatch coamings, cap log, and waterways. The cabin skylight and two hatched forward of it, including the capstan, and all combined into one hatch where the battery is accessed, and which hides the aft ballast rod and main power switch. The cap logs Are 1/2" wide x 1/4" tall basswood that was tren'led, glued, and copper nailed, onto the deck, flush with the outside of the hull covering this seam completely. The the angled wood waterways were installed around the inside of the cap log, and the deck got a coat of oil-based satin poly. This actually leeched in and made the marker seams bleed a little. in hind sight, I think I'll go with paint over marker for seams in the future. The coamings got painted black. I'm not sure why the Navy painted deck fittings black. it was even common to paint to top surfaces of tops black. I wonder how many injuries and losses this cost the navy that white paint would have prevented. Anyway... Constellation didn't have "solid" bulwarks, but rather she had hammock irons bolted to her cap log. These were removed when Baltimore tried to pass her off as a frigate and tossed in the bilge. When the ship was restored as a sloop of war, they found all but one. These irons are designed to have wooden rails at their tops, inboard and out, and have holes so several lines can be run through them. The Navy in it's wisdom though, decided to wainscot them to appear as solid bulwarks, despite the additional splinter hazard that would be in battle. I wasn't making all those metal
    stanchions
    just to hide them under wood and tarps, so I made wood blocks sheathed in sheet bass, scribed to look like vertical wainscotting. It was the end of April by now, and the Baltimore Port Expo was in two weeks. I wanted to have hammocks in the bulwarks, as she appears in the portrait, but there was no time to figure this out, so I layered on some balsa and shaped it so it looked like tarps were laid over the hammocks. When I figure out how I'll represent the stowed hammocks, I can pull the balsa off easily enough. The bulwarks on, I made some fittings for the spencer masts; installed the eye bolts at the base of the masts; made some bollards (or whatever name they gave those posts), made and installed the catheads, which are laminated 1/16" basswood. I then started setting up a jury rig and her controls so she could sail at the Port Expo. I set her t'gallants and all three heads'ls this time around. By the night before the Expo, she was ready to go.
    3 years ago by Jerry Todd
    Forum
    1/12scale SPEEDLINE Trent lifeboat kit
    I Have been asked by the widow of one of our old members to sell this kit, it is the complete works from speedline for the Trent lifeboat at 1/12 scale. 48" long. Very little has been done to the kit so far. comprising of:- Hull and wheelhouse Handrail
    stanchions
    and kicking boards Casting set Window set Vac forming set Brass rod Screws very small nuts and bolts Running gear set Brass detail set 3 made up crew members She would like offers very near. Β£500. PM me if interested for contact details this would be for collection from Gravesend Kent only.
    3 years ago by modeltugman
    Forum
    fitting in stauntobns solent lifeboat
    Is stauntobns Irish for
    stanchions
    ? I still don't know the measurement but surely one of the Lifeboat buffs does. Cheers Doug 😎
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Small scale cleats and bollards
    And by today's post I receive a small Jiffy bag full of goodies!! What a service, from the IoM too! ModellingTimbers:- http://www.modellingtimbers.co.uk/ Everything I asked for, rigging cord to die for, Japanese rigging shears, a scale model galvanised bucket kit with photo-etched detail(!!!) and the most beautiful
    stanchions
    . 2 ball for my scale, but no matter, they will look superb on "Vanity" with a bit of cable run through the balls. And the cheapest brass strip I have ever seen (for deck trim, once plated, on classic speedboat models). I repeat my warning that anything you require, I would get now, as he may run out and several lines will not be repeated, at any price. Martin
    3 years ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Make what you can and buy what you have to
    and in the adjacent handicraft section you can find things like reels of inexpensive and fine silver and brass wire, like I used for the 'balcony' on my U26 πŸ‘ soldering needs cleaning up I know! Or stainless steel cable as I used for the handrails just visible at the bottom of the picture 😎
    stanchions
    are split-pins πŸ˜‰
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    working on hand rail and
    stanchions
    Hi i need some help on hand rail and
    stanchions
    the measurement how far in from the side of the superstructure all so between
    stanchions
    and the full length of the hand rail front and back of the of superstructure. many thanks cliff
    3 years ago by Mataroa
    Response
    Ketch Irene
    Thought I would have ago at the fittings for the booms. The bands around the mast made as before ( bore a bar to fit & part off). Solder a lug on place on a mandrill together & drill pivot hole, so they are the same. The barrel, drill down the centre of a 3/16th rod to fit a 3/32 rod. Solder on a lug wile soldering the rods together. Notice the small rod protrudes farther out at the bottom. This is so as I take the tension of the sail the top can pull out freeing the barrel, allowing the sail to be rolled around the boom. The lug is drilled 10BA clearance. The rod in the centre of the boom is turned from hexagon bar, a saw cut down the centre of the remaining hexagon. Drilled & tap 10BA & clearance one side. Now looking in my old gears, thinking of a size to make the reefing drum a stroke of luck. I found the wheels from a correction tape dispenser just the job. Made the
    stanchions
    in the 4 jaw. A jig to get the holes the correct distance from the out side of the hull. As the hull planks are 3" & the bulwark planks only 1" the do not run up flush as nearly all models show.
    3 years ago by hammer
    Blog
    The radio aerial & handrails.
    Only the aerial base is supplied in the set of white metal fittings so it needs a rod added to complete it. First I bored out a hole through the base using a 2mm bit in a pin drill and then I used a short length of 2mm brass rod for the aerial. This rod was tapped with a 2mm thread and a nut filed to a round profile used as an end stop on the thread. I left sufficient thread below the base for fixing through the tapered aerial base, cabin roof and the reinforcing piece on the underside of the wheelhouse roof. The upper end of the rod was fitted with a hand turned knob as a finishing piece and for safety and the piece was sprayed with etch primer and two coats of white gloss. Finally I tapped a 2mm thread into a small piece of brass which was glued to the underside of the roof for the piece to screw into. The handrail bases were bought on-line from Polly Model Engineering and are 3Β½" gauge
    stanchions
    , normally used on steam locomotives, along with some 3/32" stainless steel rod and 8BA fixing nuts and washers. The fitting of these was quite straightforward but the two rails on the wheelhouse roof need to be bent to follow the roof curvature. The rods are fixed into the
    stanchions
    with a drop of thin superglue.
    3 years ago by robbob
    Response
    Upper deck details
    Hi Dave, No I didn't make the scale 1/78th brass
    stanchions
    . They are available from Billings Boats.
    3 years ago by sandkb
    Response
    Upper deck details
    I used to hate doing
    stanchions
    and railings. Do you use a jig to make the
    stanchions
    ?
    3 years ago by Dave M
    Blog
    Upper deck details
    More work on hand rails, rail
    stanchions
    and radar mast. Next on list will be the rails to the
    stanchions
    and hand rails to the cabin Eye bolts. Wheel house roof will be removable and will incorporate working LED lights.
    3 years ago by sandkb
    Forum
    solent lifeboat
    stanchions
    Hi Cliff I believe it would have been 3:32 or possibly 7:64. The important point is to make sure you do not weaken the brass tube but also be sufficient to allow the chain to pass through. I suggest you buy some chain then use the smallest drill that allows the chain to pass through. I suggest you look at www.eileensemporium.com/ as they supply brass tube at reasonable prices and different thicknesses. I bought my chain from SHG http://www.shgmodels.com/. Download the catalogue and look at page 25. Good luck with the build Dave
    3 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    solent lifeboat
    stanchions
    Hi can anyone tell what height and width of the
    stanchions
    on 1/12 solent lifeboat and how many or ther ? many thanks cliff
    3 years ago by Mataroa
    Forum
    solent lifeboat
    stanchions
    Hi Dave what size drill bit do you use for the holes in the
    stanchions
    for the chain to go true ? thanks for ur help cliff many thanks cliff
    3 years ago by Mataroa
    Forum
    solent lifeboat
    stanchions
    Hi Cliff I used 1/8" diameter brass tube from B&Q. Made a jig and drilled each post with two holes to accept some brass chain I bought bt the metre from SHG supplies at one of the E. Port shows. Mine has sixteen either side and are 90mm from top to deck. I made a small shaped brass piece to cover the open top of the tube. I have seen others using flat strip of a similar size. If you use the lifeboat tag on your post you will find lots of posts, keep selecting "see more" and you will find pics of solent models. I am attaching pics of my model and hope this helps. if you are after a true scale version I suggest you look on the Mayhem site or the Lifeboats 24 site. If you or any other viewer find my answer helpful please feel free to tick the "like this post" box. Dave
    3 years ago by Dave M


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