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    Forum
    Glue
    I think this is a subject that many of us have pondered and discussed. I where possible try to use a single material for a particular structure so that the adhesive used is the recommended one for that material be it wood, metal, plastic, or glass plus the many variants of each. Then comes the issue of joining dissimilar materials for example
    styrene
    to wood
    styrene
    adhesive, so a contact adhesive or a specific epoxy could be suitable. However now you should also consider the type of joint you are using and the resultant forces that will be applied to the joint as this will greatly affect the adhesive used. I have uploaded a couple of charts which are just very basic concepts of joint type and possible adhesives but this is a subject that cant be covered in a simple blog PS Gorrila glue makes some interesting claimsπŸ™ˆπŸ™‰πŸ™Š good look
    6 months ago by mturpin013
    Forum
    Painting over epoxy
    I have used several Halfords Aerosol spray cans on boats over the recent years. In each case I have sanded the hull down to bare wood as the boats were vintage ones and did have coats of paint on them that could not be identified. Best to use thin applications of both primer then paint then build up on that after leaving 24 hours between each coat. Another good point is that Halfords also stock plastic primer in their paints range which is ideal if your boat has a poly
    styrene
    hull or you have plastic fittings. Boaty😎
    8 months ago by boaty
    Directory
    (Working Vessel) Progress J-502
    Billing Boats kit, Progress J-502 vacuum formed hull, deck and cabin. Wheel house is very thin wood 2 ply. The kit was missing
    styrene
    strips, but the deck fittings were included. All brass rods, mahogany strips, rigging was in the kit. Added furniture in wheelhouse, navigation lights, windows, and railings and other details not found in the kit. Fun little boat to make and research. (7/10)
    9 months ago by Ron
    Response
    A QUICK BUILD IN PICTURES OF HMS EXETER
    Hi Michael, I believe John did mention at the beginning that he used
    styrene
    on the hull to simulate the hull plating. A great build, hope my 1:96 HMS Manxman turns out so well. Cheers, Doug 😎
    9 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    Rudder location, blocking, fabrication
    Looking at the proper rudder location, I added some 1/4 triangular hardwood blocking to both sides of the centerboard. Needed blocking to drill through. Was able to pickup the work board and all fit under my drill press to keep the hole plumb. Rudder post will be a 1/4 brass rod with brass tube as a bushing. See photo, brass tube in hull. Next, I built a rudder substructure assembly which will be covered later with a wood or
    styrene
    full size rudder to fit the era. Took some very thin brass and formed it around the post, some brass plate and soldered as seen in photos. Brass heats up and solders well using my soldering station.
    9 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Winter seems to encourage modeling, have spent many hours in hibernation working on the deck and superstructure details. A supplier offers a full set of Perkasa fittings, most of which would work on the Brave B. At one point considered buying a set. They are made in both resin and cast metal. Eventually parsimony prevailed, so only purchased a small number of hatch covers and other intricate shapes that would be difficult to make well. The items duly arrived and the quality is good. Was surprised by the weight though, so am pleased had embarked on making the other items from the usual materials. There should be an overall weight saving, along with a reduction in my surplus
    styrene
    and wood stock. One of the design tenants of the Brave class was flexibility. The vessel could operate as a MTB, MGB or Raider, or with a mixture of these capabilities. The weapon mountings were designed to allow armaments to be installed and moved around to suite the requirements of the role. Have reviewed many Brave class photographs trying to establish a β€œstandard” armament configuration, to reproduce. Not only does the configuration define the weapons installed, it also establishes the ammunition and flare storage cabinet arrangements. Eventually decided upon the 2 x 40mm Bofors gun arrangement with 2 x 21” torpedoes and 4 x extended range fuel tanks. The model is now essentially complete. No doubt as I keep examining it will add further small details and refinements. Only disappointment so far is that it does not achieve the original weight target of 6 lbs, it is 9.5 lbs. The 6 lbs may possibly have achievable using one screw and motor etc., but once three are installed, not likely. The real test is when finally back on the water. Will close this blog then with a concluding report.
    10 months ago by RHBaker
    Blog
    Fan Surround
    Third update today, make sure you see the two prior to this one. Mounted fan and built a
    styrene
    plastic enclosure around it. Sealed the edge with some silicone. Shown now with stopper inserted. it's ready for a test but I need to add some support legs to keep it vertical as it just rolls over right now. Joe
    10 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    LED Nav. Lighting
    Two days ago I put what I hope is the final paint on the hull, hatch and misc. parts. I like to let it sit for several days to cure, especially in cooler weather. I took the time to work out LED navigational lighting for my Brooklyn Tug and got that installed. I will photograph that tug later. Back to the springer tug, I had difficulty finding a good mounting spot for the starboard and port lighting so I decided to raise it on a light bar. Photos show the
    styrene
    structure in progress which will have the green and red side lights and a single white light on the top center post. Worked out the resistor values to reduce current and work off of my 6 volt supply, then soldered as shown. Fed the assembled LEDs through the plastic rectangular tunnel I created. The one photo I took with the red LED turned on is so bright that the camera just picked up a bright spot. I may have to reduce brightness but will test out in daylight first.... These LEDs are very bright and are 360 degree view! Ordered from "superbrigntleds.com" in order to get the full 360 as the ones at the local store were very limited to 18 to 60 degrees. Ordered red, green and white and they arrivedin about four days, great service. I have used this company several times and am happy with them, good to know. More to come, Joe
    10 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Ships-Ladder
    Back at it this afternoon, handrails are very solid after overnight cure. Trimmed the rail ends to the necessary length. Glued in place. Built a ships ladder, first time for this, think it will work. Need to get ships ladder set to finalize railing. Ladder railing is seen in photo, I make bends like on this by applying heat and bending with my fingers.
    styrene
    gets very flexible with heat, but can quickly melt if not careful. I learned not to use my heat gun (used for shrink tubing in my electronics) as it quickly gets out of control. I usually boil water, let it sit and dip the plastic in and out. Easy way to control bends. Joe
    10 months ago by Joe727
    Response
    Railings
    Boatshed, I see you are in the UK, I'm glad to see they sell this
    styrene
    there. Good stuff, it takes a while to get a good collection, you must have been at it for a while too. What are you building with
    styrene
    ? Cheers, Joe
    10 months ago by Joe727
    Response
    styrene
    source
    Hi Joe, Thanks, for sharing! It's a good website to know of! Regards, Ed Hi Boatshed, I'm going to order too, it comes in handy!
    10 months ago by figtree7nts
    Response
    styrene
    source
    I also have a pile of packets of the same stuff like that.
    10 months ago by BOATSHED
    Blog
    styrene
    source
    Ed, I get my
    styrene
    at a local train model shop, all of the other hobby shops closed down. it is from Evergreen Scale Models and they do sell on-line as well. Evergreenscalemodels.com I buy both the shapes and sheet
    styrene
    and I cut all my materials with single edge razor blades as a, sharp blade is always good. Buy bulk packages and go thru a couple a day. See photos
    10 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Railings
    Last night I had done a quick railing mockup as seen in the first three photos. Decided to go with
    styrene
    and use a rectangular stanchions (verticals) and top handrail along with horizontal round intermediates. Drilled holes through the verticals and inserted the round rods, then glued. Worked pretty well. Next few shots show how I typically sketch up to scale and determine proper spacers, dividers come in handy for this. Then drew some guide lines for assembly, taped it to my tack surface, covered in wax paper and pinned the assemble in place. Pins do not penetrate anything,just uses pressure to secure. Some drops of
    styrene
    cement and the parts are welded together. Then on to all the railings needed. Will let dry overnight and trim ends in place. FYI -- Tack surface is just a piece of acoutical ceiling tile, I cut down the 2'x4' size to make smaller ones for my tiny workbench use. I learned this pinning method from building balsa airplanes, comes in handy a lot...... Joe
    11 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Pilot House Structure
    Hello, I was not happy with the pilot house and substructure location toward the rear of the tug, that was when I was considering a tug ferry. Repositioned now to the more traditional tug front location. Cut up the old structure and am reworking it. Photos show the progress from last night and today, very time consuming, but I enjoy working with
    styrene
    . Lost some time fooling around with some LED nav lighting, but I did not have all of the required sizes and colors, maybe later after sea-trials. Hopefully I will wrap up the details in the next week and get on to final paint. inside mechanical and electronics are complete. More tomorrow. Regards, Joe
    11 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Hatch & Tow Bitts
    Last night I started on the large hatch that will cover the entire deck opening rather than several hatches, this is to keep with simple approach. The pilot house and whatever else I decide to add will be attached to this for easy removal and access for battery charging and maintenance. it's not as easy as a flat deck hatch as I curved the deck and wanted to curve the hatch as well. See photos, I cut curved sides, then I clamped it to blocks on the bench to bend , glued and let dry for 24 hours. While that's setting up I started on building some tow bitts. These I am making from
    styrene
    that I had from my railroad scratch building. See two small for aft and 1 larger at the bow that is in progress. In addition, I showed some shots of my Brooklyn Tug Bitts. These are heavy duty and were made of brass! Still enjoying this simple build..... Joe
    11 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Deck, servo mount
    Put together a pilot house based on some tugs I've seen. Just freelanced it as I went. I build a lot with
    styrene
    so I am used to just cutting and building. I use liquid
    styrene
    cement that fuses the materials together. See photo, will trim it out as I mount it, need to add some detail at roof and some Navigational lighting. Put on on 3mm plywood deck, same as hull bottom. The deck is also curved (proper term is SHEAR) and I started to build up some wood edge at the opening. Will sand everything well, then start sealing and priming all surfaces. Made a bracket for the rudder servo mount and an adjacent platform for the ESC and RX. Ordered two 6v 5ah SLA batteries. I will wire in parallel to stay with 6v and get 10ah. I like to stay with 6 volts as I want the motor to run slow like a tug should. Will wire in an in-line fuse. Haven't decided where I will put switch, up high somewhere to avoid water. I will show the wiring once I get to it. This build is going fast because it's a simple design, just what I was looking for. I work on it late afternoons and into the evening while I watch basketball games. About 4 hrs a day. Looking forward to building the hatch and getting some primer started tomorrow. Regards, Joe πŸ‘
    11 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    After completing the cowl, turned to the rear structure covering the gas turbine and other engine spaces. This can readily be made from
    styrene
    sheet. The sides and top were cut out, reinforced with β€œL” shaped angle and fitted together with CA glue. No particular challenges, other than determining where the various section transitions occur. Luckily had two different sets of plans to compare, so the nuances could be established. It was not until the rear structure was fitted into the cowl, the assembly fitted to the removable deck and placed on the hull, realized just how important this milestone was. Once everything is firmly located the accuracy of build becomes readily apparent. Any inaccuracies show up as an obvious misalignment. Was able to check the alignments and squareness using eye, rules, squares and a spirit level and was pleased with the outcome. A subtle sanding of about .020” off the base of one side of the superstructure and everything became square, parallel and correctly aligned. Quite a relief! Have always stressed the importance of accuracy throughout a build. This supported that recommendation. Once the superstructure was completed realized my plan to lift the deck off to gain access to the electrical control switches was impractical. Have thus cut a small access hole in the rear deck to facilitate access. Still undecided how to best disguise the hole, but at least access is now relatively easy. From now on, until the test program can be continued on the water, will add detail to the model. Doubt there will be much to describe is that of interest, or that has not been covered by others. Will continue this blog once there is anything significant to report. In the meantime, best wishes for Christmas and 2019,
    11 months ago by RHBaker
    Response
    Sanding done
    Shucks! Mine are all red 😭 BUT; just found some 1 and 2mm white
    styrene
    tooob in the stash 😊 Guess they'll do for my T45, Belfast and Illustrious. Thanks for the prompt Steve1 Cheers, Doug 😎
    12 months ago by RNinMunich
    Blog
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Back to the build. Next milestone, to complete the superstructure and engine covers. The superstructure is essentially a cowl that supports the open bridge and serves as the air intake for the gas turbines. The engine covers fit into the rear of it. The superstructure is full of curves and will be interesting to make. Still trying to save weight, decided to make it out of glassfibre. Rather than first make a plug then a female mould and finally the cowl, wanted to try the technique of making a plug out of
    styrene
    foam sheet, then covering it in a glass fibre matt. Once the glass fibre is set, the foam is dissolved out using a solvent and the cowl remains – inshallah! To ensure the foam did not react to the glass fibre resin, painted the finished cowl with enamel paint before sticking the matt down. See pictures. What a mess! The resin had crept under the paint and into the foam dissolving it. When the resin dried the plug had shrunk slightly and had the surface finish of a quarry. First thought was to hurl it and start again, this time in wood. On second thoughts, wondered if the plug could still be used. Decided to build it up with wood filler and from it make a female mould, as originally intended. The cowl would then be made from the mould. Built the damaged plug up and sanded it smooth. As the plug would be covered in fibreglass, the surface finish was not critical. Brushed a coat of fibreglass on the plug and, after drying filled any defects with glaze putty and sanded smooth. Once the finish and dimensions were satisfactory, applied a thicker coat of glass fibre to the plug. This was again smoothed down, waxed with carnauba polish and then covered in mould release. From it the cowl was made. Picture shows plug, mould and cowl placed side by each. The cowl requires reinforcement; the fittings and various mountings then adding before installing. A trial installation showed that it fitted properly the deck and was accurate. A lesson for the next time is to make the plug and mould much deeper than the finished item. That will allow any rough edges, on either the mould or the component, to be trimmed off leaving a smooth fibreglass edge.
    12 months ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    All hooked up, nowt happens...
    Here's a pic of the set-up, with the ESC central. Rx is in a little
    styrene
    box I made for it. Shows the motor too on its mount. Martin And yes I got the heat shrink on the battery leads the wrong way round, but had so much trouble soldering the bloody wires to that stupid t shaped plug I couldn't be arsed to change em over!
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Cleaning sails, toy yachts, etc....
    I just got a lovely old Star SY 3 yacht and needed to clean some filthy sails. My wife suggested Vanish and blow me down with a genoa, it's working. A generally mid to dark grey (I believe oil based) grubbiness has all but disappeared and I should be able to re-rig them with some new off white 1.3mm string from Caldercraft fittings at Cornwall Model Boats. I can make new
    styrene
    bowsies and any metal hooks and loops. I've scraped the mast and bowsprit fittings of rust until they look shiny again, repaired a broken mast and repainted the green edging which had been a bit knocked about. I love doing these restorations more than making new stuff! Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Directory
    (Other) Skimmer
    built from
    styrene
    . Used some online plans as a guideline. (8/10)
    1 year ago by solo1274
    Directory
    (Working Vessel) Kingfisher
    Built from plans downloaded on the internet. Hull is planked with a wood deck planked over ply. The superstructure is also made in wood, mostly 3mm ply. (ESC: viper 15) (8/10)
    1 year ago by solo1274
    Forum
    Old outboard motor...
    Hi Doug, I do have a Hobbyking CNC ally one and now have a brushless inrunner for it. I got it when they were very cheap a while back. Wouldn't pay what they now want for them and Graupner are always way overpriced. I could be tempted with 7 quid for a Hobbies one though, just to see how it goes together. The K&O are gorgeous but collector money and the Alterscale are dummies, albeit nice dummies and also bloody expensive. I sliced the little vintage jobby I bought down the joint line with a fine saw blade in the minidrill today and all is well. it just needs new wires and some grease when I can find some good
    styrene
    /nylon grease. The motor is a two magnet Kako, many examples of which I have in store. Even has a nice little built in switch. I reckon 3 volts is probably all the transmission can take. The gears are not, as I assumed bevels, but 2 spur gears! I now have to find a way of making the prop shaft stay on the motor shaft! I'm loving this restoration stuff. Painted the red on my Star yacht today with my best chisel headed sable and got a special 1/4 litre of the emerald green mixed in HMG enamel (the very best there is). Tried to win a lovely Starlet off ebay, but some sod beat me to it last minute. I hope it leaks Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    Sorry joined the thread late on ,when brass fumes etc were being mentioned ,black nitrile are very good for folk who are very sensitive to talc and other types if powder used inside some gloves
    1 year ago by marky
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    I started building a dutch coaster recently from a kit which is all plastic and
    styrene
    . I have no experience of using these materials. Progressing reasonably well but am finding that my fingers are becoming very sore, splitting and losing top layer of skin. Lips are swelling too. I can only guess this is a reaction to the
    styrene
    and would like to know if anybody else has this problem and how they get round it apart from stopping the build. Any help will be gratefully received. Regards, Nerys
    1 year ago by Nerys
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    Glad to hear that Nerys πŸ‘ All's well ... πŸ˜‰ Don't forget to Blog the build!! I use Contacta as well, good stuff. Cheers, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    I ceased work on the kit for a few days for my hands to recover and am now using blue nitrile gloves. I am using Revell Contacta Professional glue. Since resuming work, I have had no problems - so far, so good! I can't see that fumes come into the equation unless the
    styrene
    is being heated. Nerys
    1 year ago by Nerys
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    styrene
    fumes? You'll only get fumes if you heat it. My chum works a vac-former to make model car glazing and he thoroughly washes every sheet of PVC before forming it. Stops micro-bubbles forming. I use blue nitriles when epoxying. I always found latex melted on contact with most of the things I used, like enamel paint, Marineflex, etc. Nitriles stay put. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    Spoke with the H&S Adviser at the University he said that disposable masks are no good for
    styrene
    fumes you would need a filter type like 3M 6051,he also said if your allergic to handling it best to use Black Nitrile gloves as used by tattooists and to sook the fumes off with a vacuum or extractor.πŸ‘
    1 year ago by marky
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    Good point about the gloves Martin!πŸ‘ Not being affected (like Granny used to say "No sense, no feeling"!) I hadn't considered that and never 'eard of blue nitrile! Would be interesting to know which glue Nerys is using! Would also recommend that she washes her plastic stock with washing up liquid, to remove any possible residue from the production process, before starting to cut it. Cheers, Doug
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    Where gloves are concerned, use blue nitrile as there are probably more people allergic to latex than
    styrene
    ! Don't know about you though, but I can't breathe in any mask worth it salt. I just do it all outside in the almost permanent breeze that blows round my bungalow. I stand in the doorway of the shed and spray out into the great blue yonder.
    styrene
    , fortunately doesn't affect me. When Slater's first popularised Plastikard, old man Slater used to demonstrate the making of things like model house window frames with Micro strip and Slater's own solvent called Mek-Pak. The smell was glorious and just oozed quality modelmaking to me. I always made a bee-line to Slater's stand at any suitable exhibition. These days I use Plastic Weld as it does more plastics than just
    styrene
    and it doesn't have that lovely "esterish" smell. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    Since
    styrene
    itself is an oil, suspected in some countries of being carcinogenic, used in producing various polyxxx plastics, I strongly suspect the the glue is the source of the problem as you can't be coming into contact with
    styrene
    oil itself. So I repeat, good ventilation, extractor fan, thin latex surgical gloves and a face mask as one should also use when spraying. Cheers, Doug 😎 PS Sell that kit and buy something friendlier!πŸ˜‰ https://www.wikiwand.com/en/
    styrene
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    Hi Nerys, my son is allergic to all types of plastic glue, so he only works with other materials. I am allergic to rust, not good when you work with iron and steel. I have to use gloves and a mask. It may be advisable to ask your gp for a skin allergy test. Cheers Colin.
    1 year ago by Colin H
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    Not necessarily allergic to
    styrene
    , but many are allergic to CA Glue. Once a CA Glue sensitivity develops, it is difficult to overcome. Try masks; try good ventilation. Even when cutting
    styrene
    , ensure You have good ventilation.
    1 year ago by Tug_Hercules
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    I started this post hoping to get advice on allergic reaction to modelling with
    styrene
    but it seems to have turned into soldering problems. I'd really like to know if anybody else has had any trouble with
    styrene
    and how they coped with it. Fair winds, Nerys
    1 year ago by Nerys
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    Certainly not melting and I'm pretty sure it was soft solder only as I know he had no knowledge of silver soldering. I use silver solder (hard soldering) all the time and have done for over 50 years, most of it with cadmium rich (still, I get it from ebay) and I have had no unpleasant reactions. OK, currently I have the shed door open as it's a very small shed, but I never used to in a 7x5. Before that the space was always bigger. Cadmium free modern silver solder is crap as it will not flow as well as Cadmium containing. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    If he was heating /melting the brass it could be zinc fumes which if inhaled or ingested can give galvanic poisoning which can give flu type symptoms and the need to stay close to the toilet. that's why if your brazing always do it in a well ventilated area . Cheers marky
    1 year ago by marky
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    An old friend of mine in Santa Monica who'd made models for years suddenly found he had a sensitivity to
    styrene
    and resins and had to pack it up. He bravely decided to go over to all metal work, but something about that disagreed with him too and he packed up all modelmaking as it was starting to affect his wife too. Heaven knows what it could have been with the metal as it was all brass, so none of that nasty storage oil they put on steels. I think I'd just put up with it as I couldn't stop modelmaking even if I wanted to. I did painting when we lived afloat for lack of space, but I didn't find it satisfying enough. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    .... and make sure the working area is well ventilated, an extractor fan helps enormously, as also with spray painting or soldering (esp with the old lead based solders). it's the solvents drying your skin out, removes all the skin oils. Can make your eyes sting as well. 😭 Cheers, Doug
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    Also put your lippy on or some lip salve too Keeps the fumes away from your lips.XπŸ‘
    1 year ago by onetenor
    Forum
    styrene
    Allergy?
    Hi Nerys, You have to ask yourself. is it the
    styrene
    or is it the glue? Why don't you try using surgical gloves! Non allergenic gloves might help. Give it a try and see if this helps! If not you might have to stop the build. Until you figure out what your allergic to! Hope this helps.... Cheers, Ed
    1 year ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights
    Doug: I feel like a dunce for not noticing that anchor before. it sticks out like a sore thumb if you know where to look. That’s another thing that I’m surprised hobby engine didn’t add to the boat. I guess in the long run it was easier for moldmaking purposes to omit that particular detail. That’s another thing, however, that wouldn’t be all that hard to scratchbuild. All that’s needed is to cut an opening in the bulwark & build a sheet
    styrene
    box for the housing. it’s not exactly a high priority item, but I think it would go a long way toward adding realism. So far none of the photos of the Wyforce I seen show what the anchor enclosure looks like on the inside of the bulwark. Then again maybe some of them did & I missed that, too. I assume there’s an anchor winch, possibly below deck near the chain locker. I expect there’s a β€œdrop/raise” button inside the pilot house. I’ll browse for a photo of the anchor & post it if I succeed. Thanks
    1 year ago by PittsfieldPete
    Forum
    Exciters/transducers
    Great stuff. Really useful. Interesting that they do not want boxing in. It is the mrrc ones that I intend to use on the Launch. Have Dayton ones on the tug. Away at the moment but will check out you YouTube stuff when back. Are you saying more open foam/poly
    styrene
    works better than the more dense stuff? Cheers. NPJ
    1 year ago by NPJ
    Forum
    1/16th scale Tamar
    I'm considering Model Slipay Tamar Class as my next project. I have never used
    styrene
    before (other than Airfix in my youth). Every article I have read on this model have used a twin Speed 600 ECO set up. I am toying with the idea of brushless but have no idea where to start in terms of equivalent motors etc. any idea anyone?😁
    1 year ago by marlina2
    Forum
    1/16th scale Tamar
    I would always say if you don't need lots of speed stay brushed, "ordinary" motors. As for
    styrene
    , it can warp horribly so needs more bracing than you might think or the kit manufacturer might tell you. Brace with liteply or hard balsa/obeche where you can out of sight. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Mahogany in Scale
    Maybe I should write one, eh, Colin? For the scratchbuilders among us. A treatise on brass bashing and woodwork. Nobody would be interested. I've just epoxied my Sea Hornet, which I'm modifying as a Chris Craft Custom Runabout. One cockpit, big hatch. Cost me 99p off ebay a few years ago. I just had to scrape all the old red paint off it as it wanted to fall off anyway! Then a huge rub down, a wipe with cellulose thinner and a coat of epoxy applied with a square of
    styrene
    sheet because I couldn't find an old credit card on the quick, just as good though. Next, rub down and 2 coats of cellulose primer surfacer, then the top coats. This one is to be one of the painted CCs. There were quite a few. But the deck will be veneered in the correct style and varnished. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    Warning
    Going back to the warning about the knives and foot injury. A safe way to keep knives handy around the building board .Have a block of expanded poly
    styrene
    or Oasis Or similar .When not in the hand stick the knife into the block. To sharpen blades use a "Water of Ayr Stone ". I find nothing better . John O/TπŸ‘
    2 years ago by onetenor
    Forum
    LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights
    Hello, Doug: I stumbled upon some other LEDs that are particularly well suited for navigation lights. They have the same specs as the rectangular LEDs shown in the photo I posted recently, but what makes them ideal for me is that they’re flat-topped, not domed. They’re cylindrical in shape, still 3mm diameter & look quite similar to ship’s lanterns (see photo). With your experience you’ve probably seen these before, but I was surprised to see them. My plan is similar to the original idea for making scale lights, except as we last discussed white LEDs will be used everywhere, colored by dipping them in appropriately colored glass paint. For the mast lights that will remain white but need to emit light at a given angle, I’ll mask & paint the LED’s body the same color as the mast, resulting in a clear aperture. 4mm & 2.5mm diameter disks punched from sheet
    styrene
    , glued one atop the other, then painted & glued to the top of each LED will form the light’s top covers. What do you think? BTW, the flat-top LEDs are also available in a variety of colors. if anyone is interested I’ll post the url to their location. Thanks, Pete
    1 year ago by PittsfieldPete


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