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    Blog
    Seat Trials and mods.
    It’s been a while since the boat had it’s maiden voyage on the lake at St. Albans and I’m pleased to report that it looks really good in the water and goes like stink if you open up the throttle. Sadly I still don’t have any decent video of the boat yet as I can’t film and drive the thing at the same time, but I do have some static wide shots from my GoPro. When I do the video I’ll ask a cameraman mate to do the honours, maybe I’ll put the GoPro on the bow and then the stern to get some low action shots…the storyboard is already building in my head!! These early runs were great as they showed up some minor problems that needed attending to. I found that it needed ballasting slightly as it was not sitting on the waterline evenly from side to side so I flattened out some old lead water pipe and cut it into small sections so that I could add ballast incrementally. I did this in the ‘domestic test tank’ and once I was happy the lead pieces were fixed in place inside the hull with some super strong double sided tape. The ESC needed a little programming adjustment because I had forgotten to set the low battery level point to ‘off’ as I am using NiMh batteries and not LiPo’s , that was the cause of the short initial run time on the first outing…..DOH !! The batteries are now held in place by
    velcro
    straps on some bearers that I added, otherwise a battery change involved cutting cable ties and replacing them at the lakeside…not very practical. The volt/amp/watt meter is also now on a proper bracket so that the display is more readable. I have also changed the charging connection from the nasty Tamiya connector to a nice little panel mount XT 60 connector that HobbyKing sell, it comes with a handy blanking plug that I have drilled for a retaining cord. I have also finally got around to upgrading the firmware on my Turnigy i6 radio to the 10 channel version so that I can assign the lighting to the switches properly and have the rotation of the searchlight on one of the two rotary knobs. I can use the old 6 channel RX in the new boat….blog coming soon.
    2 years ago by robbob
    Forum
    Bench sander
    Thanks for the info. I suspect the mod I intend may need me to dismantle the whole unit. I don't trust the stick on discs so will replace with
    velcro
    types. I agree the disc can be fitted with the plate in place and for the price it's cheap and cheerful and will certainly save some elbow grease.
    3 years ago by Dave M
    Blog
    Hobby Engine 'Richardson' Tug Upgrade
    So following a long away week-end of Astronomy, now trying to get a bit further before going away for a couple of days. As I start to wire up the power circuit I realise how important it is to think things through first! Made up the link from the Battery to a ‘choc block’ distribution point which for space reasons is under the ‘control’ platform which will fill the bow area. (Pic 1) The fuse boards were obtained from Component – shop.co.uk Ltd in Bangor which is a good source of all sorts of electrical bits for us and is in Wales! (Pic2) The Dual Esc/Mixer, from the same place, a P94 9Lite), I have secured with
    velcro
    (Pic 3) and I hope to keep the battery on top of this with a little air gap. It is at this point that I really came to appreciate the space limitations (Pic 4) and I do not have the motors wired in yet which will have fuse boards on the ‘platform’. (Pic 5). Next time hope to wire in Motors and Fuse Boards, Sound Generator and Receiver. Then see how it sits in the bath.....! NPJ
    3 years ago by NPJ
    Blog
    Battery Power and Servo Mounting 6
    Only a short one, as I have realised that dealing with Battery Mounting means I need to deal with changing the Rudder Servo first! (Pic 1) So to remove the servo was easy as was replacing with the better unit. it is by the way much easier to remove the Servo Bracket and then the Servo than leaving it in. Same naturally applies when fitting (Pic 2/3) I had to remember to have the lead coming out on the correct side though! (Pic 4) I had been thinking about whether I should be using proper metal linkages to the rudder mechanism and issues about ‘slop’, but now it looks like there will not be a choice, but let us leave that until later as this is going to be a short session. (Pic 5) In fitting the battery I was conscious that it has to pass in and out of that rear hatch, stay on the centre line and avoid fouling the Rudder Servo...................... So I cut a base plate of Balsa to stick in the bottom of the Hull so making it reasonably flat for the Battery and a Balsa Plank to stop the Battery accidentally moving towards the gear boxes. Before gluing them in place I attached
    velcro
    / hook and eye patches to hold the Battery in place. (Pic 6 ) There appears to be at least two thicknesses of this stuff, very rigid and strong and the other softer, more flexible and slightly less ‘grab power’ (Pic 7 ). I opted for the lighter stuff as it could be a struggle getting in and out of the Hatch! (Pic 8) I may need to put a loop of something around the battery to assist in removal, but that is for later. I just glued the Balsa in with ‘Gorilla’ glue and laid the battery in to add weight whilst drying (Pic 9/10/11) Next time I hope to concentrate on getting the forward platform loaded and the power linked up. NPJ
    3 years ago by NPJ
    Response
    Electronics Down Below (5)
    Thank you. Re main battery. The brackets holding gear box and motors are just more than width of battery so I have a plank across there with balsa and
    velcro
    as one of the two points to stablise the battery. Also needed to keep it away from servo. All the best. NPJ.
    3 years ago by NPJ
    Forum
    Motor problem
    further to my previous post, I have now fitted the two NiMH Batteries (not nicad as I kept saying)in the rear compartment, held in with
    velcro
    , and tidied the wires up and fitted an inline fuse, yet to be wired, the boat is much lighter, however all the other
    velcro
    is still in place so I can move them forward if needed and fit the lead or Lead acid battery, so one visit to a pond and hopefully I can get it sailing correctly, my problem is I would not know what is correct and what is not, at least I have Pauls video as a reference.
    3 years ago by RichardSReade
    Forum
    Motor problem
    the first time I sailed the boat with the old motor she was fast and literally stood up in the water on half throttle with just the lead acid battery and no ballast, it was sitting with the back end about half an inch above the underside skins and the bow was well out of the water, I was advised by one of the club members that I needed to trim the boat so it was down at the front but keeping the stern approximately where it was, therfore the lead in the compartment forward of the motor and the battery in the compartment behind. However the 5000mAh and the 3300mAh batteries are not connect and are only held in place with a bit of
    velcro
    , also the lead in the front is just shaped to the hull and cannot move, but I can lift it out, so I will see how it runs next week
    3 years ago by RichardSReade
    Forum
    Hobby Engine Richardson Upgrade
    Hi Mark, took me yonks to find them all🤔 I also experimented with battery athwartships, hope for better 'roll control' but eventually settled for between the shafts cos athwartships was too high. My 'pico' RX (ca. 5x1.5cm😉) can go almost anywhere, with
    velcro
    to hold it in place. The dual ESC can go where the old 800mAh NiMH was. Later stage: smoke genny and lighting board in the lower superstructure, as apparently also in the latest versions! Mini SMD or strip LEDs for illumination and nav lights, mini 3V geared motor for the radar perhaps. Don't need a radio channel for this, just a switch and a couple of AA alkaline batts and away you go😉 Although these days you almost never see the antenna cos it's hidden in a 'burger-bun' radome a la Furuno! 😉 Somewhere on the WWW spider web I remember seeing a working towing tackle - must dig out the bookmark, might have been Krick! Cheers Doug 😎 Glad you're enjoying it Neil, that's the whole point ain't it? 👍
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Hobby Engine Richardson Upgrade
    Neville, toilet rolls, problem, especially if you have a cat!!!. 3 screws at the stern, 1 central 2 at the corners under bollards, leaver up with thin screwdriver. 1 each side of the rear deck hatch. 1 each side opposite the cabin rear hold down bollards screw fitted in inboard side of each one. 1 each side rear of the forward hatch. 1 each side forward hatch, again hidden by bollard screw from side. 3 in the bow area. PS all screws in the deck are under small plastic plugs, be gentle with them as you want to put them back to seal the deck again. You should have 14 screws now, the deck is sealed with a gasket, 'O' ring, and what seems like Vaseline, and splits at the rubbing strip just behind the tyre fenders, might need a bit of a pull, going round the hull as you go. Once the deck is off, it is all in front of you. Looking down into the hull, there is a black battery plate, held down with 4 screws, the receiver and the on/off switch. I have kept the plate, but cutaway the dividing 'walls' was needed, for the new receiver etc to fit. It is not big enough for the buggy type battery, so i glued a thin platform on top for the battery to sit on. Battery is held with self adhesive
    velcro
    pads to keep it in place. 'Central hull' is the motors and gearbox, follow the long Red and Black wires back to the receiver and cut them as close to the receiver as you can, ready to wire into the ESC, i used a 'chocolate' block, 10ah. Stearn is the servo and steering linkage, nothing needed here just a smear of grease to lubricate. A couple of drops of oil on the ends of the propshaft won't go amiss. 'Battery position', i have mine on the radio plate, but with care and a little trimming you can fit it across the hull, above the propshafts, or with care between the propshafts, fore and aft. Make sure there is a side plate fitted to stop the battery fouling the rudder servo. Hope this is clear, don't force the deck be gentle Mark
    3 years ago by jarvo
    Forum
    Hobby Engine Richardson Upgrade
    Hi Mark, (and Dave)! hear where you're coming from! 👍 Mine is the original (or 2nd gen?) version with 40MHz and a piddly 7.2V 800mAh NiMh. And no 'special FX' 🤔 So I propose to use one of my pico 40Meg RXs and chop out all the then useless thick plastic trays.
    velcro
    is enough for the miniature stuff I want to fit. Should then have less 'space problem' 😉 I will also fit a 2S LiPo, 4000mAh and the ESC/Mixer board. That's the first stage, after that smoke generator (and engine servicing kit Mark😉) can go in the lower superstructure, also a few lights and see how we go! Diesel sound also a possibility, have some small sound transducers from HobbyKing which work as hull resonators. Tip from one of the Fireboat drivers👍 All 'down the line', Sea Scout and PT Boat are ahead in the queue! Cheers Doug 😎 PS I'm talking about the Southampton not Richardson, maybe that has less below deck space?
    3 years ago by RNinMunich
    Media
    VolantexRC ATOMIC RTR racing boat
    Having reviewed many planes, quads and cars over the last 3 years so it was refreshing to get a boat in the water. Why didn't I do this a long time ago? Bit addictive to say the least. Was surprised how quick this thing was on 3 cells. Lots of tight turns and no hint of it tipping. And a good run time not far off the manufacturers stated 8 minutes. Balance seemed to be quite critical though. The stock 3S2500 in the battery holder had it on step from the go. I dropped in a 3S2200 and despite pushing it to the furthest forward point it would bog down when it lost momentum. Easily solved with a little lead on some
    velcro
    next time out. Otherwise really impressed. Zero time to set it up. Nice it has rates dial for steering on the transmitter so can go between hooligan style tight turns and smooth high speed turns. Looking forward to taking it out again.
    3 years ago by Dom of Essential RC
    Forum
    Skimmer from Mobile Marine
    Hi Chris Mine just has a large flat ply plate over the bottom of the hull with the rx rudder servo and battery fixed in place. I use
    velcro
    for the rx and made mounting blocks for the servo. An aircraft snake connects to the rudder. The battery is in a small wooden compartment. My ESC is just below the motor mount hanging loose. You do need to strengthen the motor mount - I used lots of wood inside to make it all less pliable - the plastic is not strong enough on its own. You need to build a plinth to attach the motor high enough to attach your prop. This need to be well braced to take the thrust from the prop. Mine moves slightly and if I were to make another I would make it stronger. Mine required two small sheets of lead up front to keep it on the water at speed. Please post details of your build Dave
    3 years ago by Dave M
    Blog
    The electrics, drive & radio
    The switch panel and wiring loom was made, tested and dry fitted a while ago and so it only needs securing to the bulkhead with four fixing screws, the two NiMh batteries were strapped down to the bearers with cable ties as close to the chines as possible and the XT60 connectors mated. I have read that placing the heavy batteries as far away from the keel as possible improves the handling, all other heavy items are centered along the keel for symmetry and should help the boat to sit evenly in the water. I’m not sure if I will need to do any ballasting, hopefully the maiden voyages should give me an indication. The prop shaft was greased and fitted, and with the prop, thrust washers and lock nuts in place, the clearance was adjusted and locked with some Loctite so the motor could then be installed. The initial motor alignment was made with a solid coupler which was then replaced with the universal joint, I took the precaution to grind a flat on the motor shaft so that the locking grub screw has better grip on the shaft. The grease tube was then fitted to the shaft clamp and secured to the side of the switch panel. The ESC was fixed to the back of the bulkhead with another couple of cable ties and the input cables, again XT60 types, and the three pole XT60 motor connectors mated. I have also fitted a Turnigy in-line volt, amp and watt meter in the circuit before the ESC so that I can log readings in case of spurious fuse blowing issues or unexpected battery life problems. The water cooling tubes were then run from the water pickup, through the ESC and then back to the transom ‘exhaust’ outlet, all water connections are fitted with spring clips to ensure water tight connections. I have used quite a large bore silicone tubing to ensure maximum water flow and made sure that all bends are kink and compression free. The R/C receiver is fixed to the rear cabin wall with some
    velcro
    pads for easy removal, the two aerials were fitted in some plastic tubing at 90 degrees to each other as recommended for 2.4 gig systems and as high above the waterline as possible. The receiver is connected to a separate 4.8 volt NiMh battery via a changeover switch that also has a charging connection and LED power indicator, and I have also fitted a battery voltage indicator, just because they are cheap and convenient although the R/C system that I have has telemetry that reports RX voltage as standard. The battery charger I have chosen can handle the 16 cell series configuration of the drive batteries and so they can be charged in-situ when the main power switch is toggled over to the charge position. The RX and lighting batteries are charged separately. All of the servo and lighting switch cables are routed through the hull to the receiver through pre drilled holes in the bulkheads at high level for neatness and to retain the integrity of each compartment just in case 😲!!. The servo and cables and the water cooling tubes are strapped to a supporting bar between the bulkheads for neatness and security. With the TX switched on first, the RX is then powered up and the main power switch toggled to the ‘operate’ position, the ESC then gives a reassuring series of bleeps that confirm that all is well. The ESC was set up using a Turnigy programming card specifically for that model of controller and if required I can tweak the settings once the boat has had a few sailings. The last things to do now are to fit some strong magnets to hold the hatches and roofs down securely and then finally raise the RAF ensigns 😁
    3 years ago by robbob
    Forum
    Aerokits Fast Patrol Launch stern cover
    Hi Jonbliss152 How about using
    velcro
    or Double sided tape! Just an idea. Or see what others might recommend also.
    4 years ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    Sea Rover Help
    Hi Simon. The batteries are laid at each side on boards and will be held in with
    velcro
    , I will be able to position them as far forward as Bulkhead B2 and as far back as B4 depending on how the boat rides. The centre of the cockpit is removable to get at the servo and batteries. The cockpit floor has been raised to allow for servo and batteries. (115mm from top corner of cockpit window frame to the planking) Cockpit roof is removable, note pin on window frame and bolts on cockpit sides. I am hoping not to get too much water in the cockpit so it should be OK. With this kit you need to dry fit all the bulkheads and cabin sides to make sure it all goes together before gluing. if things don't look quite right after you have done this, look at bulkhead B2 Alan
    4 years ago by AlanP
    Response
    Velsheda
    Thanks, Dave. It's 2.4Ghz and a new servo. The receiver is
    velcro
    'd to the underside of the deck. I'll place the satellite in the roof of the nav cabin and see how it goes!
    6 years ago by NeilHodson
    Blog
    Victory Industries Vosper Fire Boat RC conversion part 7
    The maiden voyage. Well, mixed fortunes. The Cunning Plan Mk1c - steering system, small fire boats for the use of worked a treat 👍 Unfortunately the overall weight proved more of a problem than I expected. There was power a plenty and she went like the clappers but getting there was a bit nerve wracking. The angle of the props forced the bow down and I had to be careful until the hull generated enough lift to get the bow up and a give nice bow wave. Not planing like her larger sisters but she did look something like the picture on the box. You can see the problem in the water shot, the green stuff on the foredeck is some pond weed we're plagued with at the moment. (Photos 10 and 10A) The battery position is tricky as this will be single heaviest part of the kit. As you see in Photo 9 I tried
    velcro
    -ing it to the roof of the aft cabin but this put the CoG of the boat too far back and left the transom gunwale just above the water meaning that the well deck would fill with the slightest wave or when reversing. The maiden trip was with a 'hump' 6v pack just ahead of the motors but this meant that although the boat was level the bows were a bit too low. The current set-up is 4 AA batteries, 2 either side of the motors and 2 in the roof as before. it looks OK in the bath........ I hope this will inspire some of you to take the plunge. I'm no engineer and have completed this with a standard household drill, a Dremel type drill for cutting the cockpit hole and the usual small pliers, wire cutters, small files and tweezers any modeller will have to hand and a small desk mounted vice. The only slightly specialist tools were a pack of fine drill bits and a couple of pin drills obtained on Ebay. A small pillar drill would have made drilling the rudder shafts a lot easier but I passed the initiative test (and only broke one drill bit). I only have a very basic understanding of electricity and have only just figured out soldering. This isn't intended to be a definitive solution and if you can see alternatives to the above, especially the power plant let us know. Using lighter motors will help and using just one will too, but driving contra-rotating props from one motor is beyond me - at the moment. Oh, and I really wouldn't advise taking the whole deck off. You'll never get it back on properly unless you're very good or very lucky. I am contemplating rebuilding the test boat but with a completely new deck structure probably made of balsa wood to save weight - and because I bought a load cheap a while ago...........
    7 years ago by smiggy
    Blog
    Sea Trials
    Perhaps I should bring you up-to-date on my Mermaid build (and own up to not having properly finished it yet! http://model-boats.com/sys_files/graphics/smileys/026.png) Various other jobs seem to have 'got in the way' - gardening, new greenhouse, talking my self into new project (Mountfleet Puffer), buying new car etc. etc. The boat is generally complete - still haven't really finished the hull painting although I did run it on Goole MBCs pond a few weeks back. it goes like stink with the Hobbyking 1000kv Brushless Motor and 7.2v NiMh battery pack and shows very long run times. two (minor) problems - it was very twitchy on the rudder set-up I first installed - I have reduced the rudder throw to make the driving easier. To be fair the boat did turn very smartly without any sign of wanting to turn over - the hull is very light and all the 'heavy bits' are generally in the centre of the boat (both fore and aft and side to side) The battery is held in on a
    velcro
    pad - this was so that I could tweak the centre of gravity a bit if it proved to be a problem but it seemed to OK from the start. The boat is very noisy - mainly motor noise - this is probably since I haven't yet glazed any of the cabin windows - I think I will also put some sound absorbing material inside the hull level with motor and tucked away under the decking at each side. I'll try and get some video next time I take it out see pictures below Richard
    7 years ago by richald
    Blog
    AmalfI - Trial RC fitting & cabin
    Before applying the hull chines the RC was tested, then installed and re-tested, checking that it could be removed as required and would not interfere with the chine skins. A balance check was also made to ensure that the weight distribution wasn't too far out leaving just the question mark about draught and freeboard! The removable cabin was made to fit inside the coaming. Using
    velcro
    the receiver, being light, is fitted up inside the cabin which keeps it dry and a little away from the electrics. The skins fitted easily with little extra fillets to fill the gap made by adding strips to the bottom of some frames. The whole was sanded down, primed and initially sealed. Next to complete the model was the detailing. To be continued.
    8 years ago by CapnJim
    Response
    minI HD video camera fitted
    hello Graham, I got it from amazon, its a 'spy' camera in the shape of a cigarette lighter !!!. I sprayed it grey to match the destroyer (its bright yellow) the end of the 'lighter' pulls off to reveal the usb. I think its great because its only about 1cm thick and you can easily fix it down with a bit of stick on
    velcro
    , can't complain at £9:95 and free p p !!!!
    8 years ago by hydroman
    Response
    Lesro Rapier- with Lipos
    Those are the alarms I intend to use but they seem to be taking a while to come. They are so cheap I intend to install them in the boat with
    velcro
    and extension leads on the balance connectors. The lipos certainly give a weight saving too.
    8 years ago by ianed57
    Forum
    Cabin Roofs
    There are loads of methods of holding down cabins, but all dependent on what you can adapt to your own specific needs/reqements. On some of my boats I use a suitable length screw bolt, subtly hidden, it secures all down and is easily removed for access. You could use pieces of
    velcro
    , you could also possibly use some self adhesive magnetic flexI strip, all dependent on access and the size of surface available to secure with.
    8 years ago by Gregg
    Blog
    hostile projectile (racing boat)
    received the hobbywing seaking 90amp esc and fitted It with my carbon fiber plate and
    velcro
    strap,just waiting for spektrum marine rx and turnigy lipo's.
    9 years ago by hydroman
    Forum
    34'' Fireboat
    HI Pete My ESC is attached with
    velcro
    to the plate across the hull floor. I believe I used epoxy to fasten the floor to the hull but any water resistant glue would probably work. Make sure there is plenty of ventilation around the ESC. Dave
    10 years ago by Dave M
    Forum
    34'' Fireboat
    HI Pete,you might need to juggle about a little with the length of the servo horn and tiller to get the rudder movement right, I try to keep the distance between the rod and the centre of the servo horn fixing screw around 15/16mm and a similar distance for the tiller, that seems to work for me! increasing the tiller length will reduce rudder movement but increasing the servo horn length may move it too far, I try and keep them similar. Again similar to DaveM I used a 1/16 ply base fixed into the boat with epoxy under the servo and double sided tape to hold the servo in place,
    velcro
    is good for receiver and ESC but with load on the rudder it can twist and become loose. When you feed the prop shaft in try doing it slowly and twisting as you would a screw thread, you'll find much less gets pushed out of the other end, I always give a light coat of lube to the shaft as well as putting some into the tube before fitting. Roger
    10 years ago by thelegos
    Forum
    34'' Fireboat
    Hello Dave, I am most grateful for the info that you post - none of which I take as a criticism- far from it! I did think it was a fairly original model as it came with some nice solid brass fittings Ie. winch and tow hook. I have not had much success though in moving the servo. I'm obviously not getting the right positioning - it keeps locking up on movement before I reach a correct position for the rudder at either extremity. its not been very satisfying so far. Now I am lining up the motor and coupling in order to secure in position. it looks ok with very little end float! Motor spins fine under power, whether it gets too hot remains to be seen at a later date. Unable to KEEP vaseline in the shaft tho' -pumped in plenty but most of it came out again once shaft fed back into tube? Servo may remain put for first sailing. I too will use
    velcro
    to secure Esc and Receiver - its all very convenient for me and effective.
    10 years ago by PeteG
    Forum
    34'' Fireboat
    HI Pete Yes saw the post from Roger, but had already promised to post when looking at the photo gallery. Hopefully you will get the idea from both our setups. The servo is attached to the floor on wood packing and held with
    velcro
    or double sided tape - sorry I can't remember which but it has never failed and remains solid to this day. My comment regarding the age of the vessel was not meant as a criticism but refers to the fact that this kit was very popular in the 1960's and many seen today are from that era - especially if it has been fitted with an Ic engine. Modern fittings were not available, so much innovation was required by the budding modeller! At least you can claim to have an original Aerokits model and not one of the after market copies! Dave
    10 years ago by Dave M


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