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    Blog
    H.M.S BRAVE BORDERER
    Thinking of a future project and decided upon another launch type
    vessel
    . My earlier Daman 4207 project gave an interesting model with good performance. The Brave class of FPBs (Fast Patrol Boats) caught my attention. Can remember the incredible performance they offered when entering service. Only two of the class were used by the RN, although variants were used by other navies. Have decided to use proprietary Glass fibre hulls in future as they probably cost little more than building from scratch using wood and resin. They give a robust and watertight hull, but one which still requires thought to complete properly. There are several companies that offer a β€œPerkasa” hull, a Brave class derivative with an almost identical hull. From previous experience have decided to limit my models to 40” long, larger
    vessel
    s become difficult to transport and handle. After much research considered the hull offered by MTB Hulls in Gibraltar met my requirements best. The inquiry to MTBHulls was well handled; the quotation acceptable, so placed an order. Was pleasantly surprised at the shipping costs. From the UK these often approach the cost of the hull, but from Gibraltar they are much more reasonable. Delivery only took 7 days.
    2 years ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    Motor Anti-Submarine Boat MA/SB
    My latest project, a 1/24 scale MA/SB is currently taking shape. The
    vessel
    is based upon the 63ft BPBCo launch and I understand some had planked decks. There is nothing I like better than planking a deck but I can find no reference to MA/SBs having anything other than metal decks. My recommended reference book is Caostal Craft History Vol.2 which only tells me that planked decks were usually varnished whilst metal decks were usually painted grey. Can anyone assist please? Steve
    10 months ago by cormorant
    Blog
    PS Enterprise
    This model is intended to be used to carry camera such as a go pro. my current camera
    vessel
    is a barge and I can't turn the barge without it looking bad on video so I wanted a
    vessel
    that can move under its own power but not too fast. The model is 1/20 and will have 2 paddles wheels, one on each side. This particular
    vessel
    is currently in Canberra NSW but it used to operate in Uchuka NSW.
    11 months ago by rcmodelboats
    Forum
    Model Slipway Tug AZIZ
    Just confirmation that this
    vessel
    has now been sold, and is soon to be returned to service. Many thanks to the new owner. Dave
    8 months ago by Davecounty
    Forum
    Model Slipway Tug AZIZ
    Further to the previously mentioned craft, the Model Slipway Tug/supply
    vessel
    'Aziz' is also for sale. 1:50 scale, and measuring just over 110 cms. Again, constructed to the highest of standards, and with excellent detail, the craft has been used only sparingly. As with the other boats, the radio/electrical gear needs attention, as it is only presently fitted with the two motors and the rudder servo. This is a very impressive looking
    vessel
    , and I will give serious consideration to any offers that may be forthcoming. Many thanks, Dave
    9 months ago by Davecounty
    Forum
    What type of antenna is this?
    Hi Ron, Most likely 50's onward! That antenna is an RDF "Radio Direction Finder"! Chances are very high. There would be one on the type of
    vessel
    . Your model represents So, Yes I would put it on your model! Regards, Ed
    8 months ago by figtree7nts
    Forum
    Robbe Westerriff lotse pilot
    vessel
    Hi Dave, Wow that looks like spaghetti junction but I am up for a challenge. I have sent you a message Brian
    9 months ago by Hurric123
    Forum
    Robbe Westerriff lotse pilot
    vessel
    This boat is understood to be a Robbe 1:25 kit, constructed to a very high standard, and is the pilot
    vessel
    Westerriff. The craft is finished to the most exacting of standards and, whilst fitted with a motor, bow thruster and lots of wiring, will need additions and finishing to perform, with, battery, radio gear etc required. ( I also note there is no servo for the rudder ). It has sailed previously, and is provided with many attractive features, including operating water cannon, rotating radar, operating mast lights ( numerous ). The length is 106 cms, or a tad under 42 inches in old money.( The craft is supplied without the stand that is shown in the images. I am presently looking for a suitable stand, so if there is one out there to be had, please do let me ( or the new purchaser ) know. If further info or images is/are required, please do let me know. Again, I am looking for a reasonable and realistic offer for the boat, and all offers will be considered. The craft is presently moored alongside the previously mentioned Assurance class armed tug in South Manchester. ( also, the least I can do is to ensure that a suitable donation is made to the site following the sale of any of the craft that I am offering for sale ).
    9 months ago by Davecounty
    Media
    105 PBR PIBBER.
    U.S. Navy PBR 31Mkll. Patrol Boat River. This is a
    vessel
    that I'm building from scratch. To achieve accuracy I will be using a Tamiha 1/35 scale kit and scaling that kit up to 1/9th scale for the
    vessel
    I am building. it will measure up to almost 1 metre in length.
    9 months ago by sandkb
    Forum
    Folding Bulwark????!
    Hello John Thank you for looking through your new books! The picture you have uploaded is indeed a curious and interesting
    vessel
    . I have never seen such before. Could make a great ahs unusual model. I believe I have the cargo winches sorted and hope to make those next week. Now to sort an anchor winch. I have asked a number of modellers about folding bulwarks and I have been met with no idea expression each time. Obviously not something modellers bother with out would seem. Regards Toby
    9 months ago by Toby
    Blog
    Paddle Tug Iona - the hull
    So... here is a compressed build blog of my paddle tug Iona... and I'm playing catch-up as the
    vessel
    is 95% complete and has been sailed already, but there may be some interest in what I've done. Iona was scratch-built off plan and has turned out to be the cheapest build so far out of 3 I've made, mainly because I was able to source materials from the leftovers box! it's a 'mixed-media' boat 😜using traditional methods of plank on frame hull, with paddles made on my 3D printer, and other parts turned on the lathe. So starting with the hull, frames were drawn out, transferred to some scrap 9mm ply and cut out on my bandsaw, along with the keel. These were assembled on a build board with some right angle brackets / measuring tools and test fitted before being stuck in place with epoxy. This was quite difficult as the shape of the hull is critical and comes right at the start of the build. I did remake 1 frame to correct alignment. The deck stringers need to bend in 2 directions, so some steaming with a carpet steam cleaner attached to some tubes worked and the wood clamped in place to dry. Outboard sponsons (?) were fitted to make a frame for the paddle boxes to fit on. Then a large sheet of ply forms the bottom of the hull, and the only job left to complete was the (tedious) planking. This was my 1st plank on frame ship... and it took ages. I think it came out reasonably OK but I'm not a perfectionist and I know if I'd spent more time it could be better... but I didn't! Next blog will feature building the paddle boxes and superstructure.πŸ€“
    9 months ago by Harvey Kitten
    Blog
    Build Finalized
    Hello, Finally put some finishing touches on my Rescue
    vessel
    BUILD. Added rubber bumpers to assist in rescuing at bow and stern. Removed the smoker unit as these was complicating the build and was against one of my original objectives....Keep it Simple! Overal all I am pleased with is build, it was fun, quick and built mostly with scraps and parts on hand. The Springer Tug design is a great starter design and can be easily modified to personal tastes. I recommend this to those out there to get some initial or just more experience at building. it's fun! Joe
    9 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Rescue
    vessel
    - Springer Tug
    Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery
    vessel
    . I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe
    11 months ago by Joe727
    Forum
    Emma C. Berry
    I know more about full size sailing
    vessel
    s than I do models but Steve-D is quite correct in saying you need momentum in order to come about. The usual practice with a
    vessel
    with a long straight keel would be to let her pay off a little to get a bit more weigh on her, then sail her round slowly rather than putting the helm hard down. if she still got into irons, backing the foresails would help to bring her round. it wasn't unknown for a hard headed ship to let her pay right off, gybe her round, then come back on the wind on the other tack. I hope you won't have to resort to that.
    9 months ago by Nerys
    Forum
    Folding Bulwark????!
    hi there Toby, back again - I did a quick search this morning to see if I could find any more photographs to help you - I only found the one which may be of help - to show you the loading procedure - if you note these doors open out-over on the ships' sides. One of the methods I use for finding info on a
    vessel
    is not to always type the
    vessel
    name in but go for the Company's name and go for sister ships and what the ship's trading route was. This sort of method of investigation has helped me a lot - it does side track you because you inevitably read about or come across pics of Company ships which are similar to the one you are building.
    9 months ago by JOHN
    Forum
    Motor Anti-Submarine Boat MA/SB
    I have established that the decks on these
    vessel
    s were planked and usually painted RN Dark Grey Blue B15. Whilst I can source this paint in small amounts, typically 17ml, I am unable to find it in larger amounts. The boat is 82cm long x 22cm beam. Can anyone help please? Thank you Steve
    10 months ago by cormorant
    Forum
    SS HUNAN drawings
    Very good so far. The hull has been tested and the prop and rudder tested and now am creating ballast by making lead blocks to suit. The Glasgow archives had plans and photos and the staff was very obliging. Also I have found that the Swires ship business archive is held in London and they have a plan showing the changes which were made in 1953 or 1958. I cannot determine yet which because the image in the email reply was not of high definition. The staff there to date have been helpful. Then I will have to decide on whether to proceed with the later fitting out ore finish the superstructure in its original as fitted. Built in 1932 and scrapped in 1962 clearly it remained in its original fitting twice longer than the time from re- fitting to being scrapped. Likely this would account for the lack of photos in its second fitting. Don't have all the details but it largely appears to be an addition of poop deck superstructure and to such on the rear main deck. Needless there will be details lost or added in the area where these rooms were added. So will have to compare and decide and finish the build. If I can see a copy of the drawing for the revised fitting I will likely make a list and images for the benefit of others in treated in building this
    vessel
    . Toby
    10 months ago by Toby
    Blog
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Winter seems to encourage modeling, have spent many hours in hibernation working on the deck and superstructure details. A supplier offers a full set of Perkasa fittings, most of which would work on the Brave B. At one point considered buying a set. They are made in both resin and cast metal. Eventually parsimony prevailed, so only purchased a small number of hatch covers and other intricate shapes that would be difficult to make well. The items duly arrived and the quality is good. Was surprised by the weight though, so am pleased had embarked on making the other items from the usual materials. There should be an overall weight saving, along with a reduction in my surplus styrene and wood stock. One of the design tenants of the Brave class was flexibility. The
    vessel
    could operate as a MTB, MGB or Raider, or with a mixture of these capabilities. The weapon mountings were designed to allow armaments to be installed and moved around to suite the requirements of the role. Have reviewed many Brave class photographs trying to establish a β€œstandard” armament configuration, to reproduce. Not only does the configuration define the weapons installed, it also establishes the ammunition and flare storage cabinet arrangements. Eventually decided upon the 2 x 40mm Bofors gun arrangement with 2 x 21” torpedoes and 4 x extended range fuel tanks. The model is now essentially complete. No doubt as I keep examining it will add further small details and refinements. Only disappointment so far is that it does not achieve the original weight target of 6 lbs, it is 9.5 lbs. The 6 lbs may possibly have achievable using one screw and motor etc., but once three are installed, not likely. The real test is when finally back on the water. Will close this blog then with a concluding report.
    10 months ago by RHBaker
    Blog
    Build
    The heating elements in the hairdryer had two different wire gauges as elements. I removed the lighter gauge thinking they would probably draw less current. I am attempting to use 6 volts as that is what my boat is. 1. First Photo: Took a length of element and stretched it out as shown, started with a longer piece about 8". if you are at 12v probably longer. Use some alligator clip jumpers and attached to one end, ran it to negative terminal of my 6v SLA. Took another jumper and attached to a point on the wire, say about 7". JUST TOUCH the other end to the battery positive to see if it glowed, it did not. So just moved about 3/8" at a time till it glowed - See Photo. CAUTION, make certain you have a nonflammable surface to work on, I used a tile scrap. IT GETS HOT FAST AND WILL BURN, DON'T ASK ME HOW I KNOW. That's why I just touch the terminal till it glows then stop, let it cool for a while. 2. Cut element to length, than take your 16 gauge wire and the crimp tube shown in earlier post. insert both into the tube and crimp it. I used a side cutter and carefully just squeezed enough. Make sure that the element will not pull out. Do the other end. Because I am using only 6 volts, I had flattened out the wire to give me more wraps on the wick. See photo and note. 3. in the lid of the box, I located the fan at one end, the exhaust stack at the other. Drilled a hole matching the fan opening and secured with two screws, drill small pilot holes so as not to crack the plastic. Drill hole to match brass tube OD, tube is about 1" long or so. Super glued brass tube in place. Excuse the sloppy copper sheet work on the inside of the lid, it was an experiment at the time. I added this a a bit of a heat sheild as the wick and element would sit below this. 4. Next photos show the interior of the box, not the best photos of the process as this was already built.... The mint tin set inside the plastic box was an idea to do two things; first isolate the heating element from the plastic,and two, provide a smaller
    vessel
    for the fluid. You may want to just use a metal container instead of the plastic box, again I was just using what I had on hand. The wick is laying in the tin with the element propped up at on end to keep it out of the fluid. Photo shown does not show much fluid in place. This needs some work, but worked for this test. Experiment, just be sure that the lower portion of the wick is in the fluid and the element wire wrap is above the fluid level. For the test, I used some mineral oil and a bit of glycerin, smoked very well. it's late so I will run it and photograph tomorrow. Cheers, Joe (Excuse the Imperial rather than metric)
    10 months ago by Joe727
    Directory
    (Pleasure Craft) Hocus Pocus
    A 1950's Fleetline Vagabond boat updated by the previous owner recently converted to RC with 2 "future" 50hp Evinrude Big Twin 50 motors.
    vessel
    is steered buy individual motor speed rather than turning the motors. (Motor: (2) K&O 1957 Evinrude motors) (ESC: (2) Alloet 320 A) (5/10)
    10 months ago by Puddle-pirate
    Response
    Can't stop adding stuff
    Thanks Joe, look forward to that. Been looking at some commercial ones but they're **** expensive and some are too tall to fit in some of my ships. I have several of those small 5V computer fans in my stash, saved from obsolete PCs. I always saved the fans and the PSUs and various cables. The ribbon cables and various connectors can come in very handy, esp. in smaller
    vessel
    s πŸ˜‰Also have plastic, alu and brass tubes of various gauges up to 10mm. About to experiment with some small ones for model railways. Will have to build box and fan etc round them. Ciao, Doug 😎 PS No sea trials here either, everything frozen for weeks πŸ€”
    10 months ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    de Mist Naval Tug
    As I have made no progress on finding any drawings of the De Mist naval harbour tug ex Simonstown, and as kindly advised by Glyn as having been built by Dorbyl in Durban with VS propulsion, I am now switching my attention to the old steam tugs of the the late 50's and 60's...particularly the JR More (built 1961) that is currently decaying in the Durban Maritime Museum. Again I am on the hunt for drawings that must be more easily available judging by the number of models build of this
    vessel
    . She had twin props (rather than Voith Schneider or Schottel) which is something that I can handle! Any help or advice gratefully accepted.
    10 months ago by Joburg-sailor
    Forum
    Looking for North East Coble boat
    I am afraid this does not answer your enquiry but is I think of general interest for anyone interested in Cobles. I was walking around Bridlington harbour yesterday and came across a mini museum devoted to cobles. it was only three small rooms but they were full of coble memorabilia. Several model cobles as well as other local fishing
    vessel
    s and a local grab dredger. Numerous photos and other ephemera as well as various bits and pieces all to do with cobles. it's run by volunteers from the Bridlington Sailing Coble Preservation Society. Entry is free, but donations are welcome. They also run an event called the Bridlington Sailing Coble Festival which is in July this year. There were a number of working cobles in the harbour as well as two beautifully preserved sailing cobles. As somebody interested in all traditional sailing/working craft, I found this little museum well worth visiting and thoroughly recommend a visit if you are in the area.
    10 months ago by Nerys
    Forum
    Book on Sailing Barges
    Hello Joe Like you my interest turned a few years to sailing barges and East Coast sailing
    vessel
    s in general, I was then given a first edition of 'Sailing Barges' signed by the author Frank G.G. Carr and was then even more 'hooked'. For beautiful drawings and a marvellous book try to get hold of a copy of 'Vanishing Craft' by the same author but illustrated by Frank Mason who in my opinion captures the essence of all things maritime in the 18 and 19 hundreds. They sometimes come up on Amazon but aren't cheap. As Nerys states there is lots of stuff out there, best of luck researching this most interesting subject. Regards Chris G
    10 months ago by ChrisG
    Blog
    Ady Gil Trimaran Wave Piercer
    This build started out as a crap toy speed boat that resembled the New zealand wave piecer Ady Gil (ex- Earthrace) that was cut in two in 2010 by the illegal japanese whaling
    vessel
    Shonan Maru no2. The original speedboat toy was 22 inchs long and had straight wings that connected the pontoons, the wings and the pontoons have been changed and custom made onto the existing hull and the bow has been extended and sharpened (now 26in), the stern has been rounded. The hull has now been gel coated and i have started sanding it back.
    1 year ago by rcmodelboats
    Directory
    (Naval Ship) MV Krait
    The MV Krait is a wooden-hulled
    vessel
    famous for its use during World War II by the Z Special Unit of Australia during the raid against Japanese ships anchored in Singapore Harbour. The raid was known as Operation Jaywick. The MV Krait is on display at the Australian National Maritime Museum. (5/10)
    11 months ago by rcmodelboats
    Media
    Electric Barbarella
    Ahoy Maties! it's been a long time since my last posting. Happy 2019! I just completed my new scratch-built boat "Electric Barbarella". I tried to recreate (with some liberties) one of my favorite boats of all time, the 30-footer Chris Craft Sportsman built during the 1970s. it measures 24 X 8.5 inches. it is powered with a 9.6 NiMH 4200 mAh battery "nunchuck" pack (like the one used for paintball guns), brushless motor attached to a 30A Mtroniks Hydra controller and a 30mm M4 3-bladed brass propeller. The hull (my own on-the-go design) was made out of Balsa wood which later I fiberglassed. For the superstructure I utilized 2mm ABS plastic sheet material. To my surprise the boat turned to be a very stable and forgiving platform. I really feel a very close connection to this
    vessel
    as it is my first own hull design.😁
    11 months ago by Krampus
    Response
    Crack in seam Repaired!
    Ed, I have the plastic hull. I used a strip of fiberglass per instructions and never have had a leak issue. At the time I did this, about 4 years ago, I was doing a lot of fiberglass work so I had the proper supplies. Adheres to plastic hull well. My current build is a Springer Tug Rescue
    vessel
    , I am hoping to get the plywood hull sealed only with paint. We will see... Joe
    11 months ago by Joe727
    Forum
    de Mist Naval Tug
    Hi Joburg-sailor! De Mist was built by Dorbyl, Durban, in 1978. Powered by two 8-cylinder Mirrlees Blackstone diesel engines with twin Voith-Schneider propulsion units. No idea if plans are available of this specific tug, but I do have some of similar
    vessel
    s that were built by the same company for SAR&H in 1980 that are still in service (but probably nearing their service lives by now). Regards, Glyn
    11 months ago by Glyn
    Response
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    Thanks for your suggestions. Once we get back on the water in the Spring will investigate further. My last run in the fall indicated that the performance was now satisfactory and predictable. Cannot wait to try again and confirm. This is my first foray into a high speed
    vessel
    and it gives plenty of food for thought as even minor adjustments can make a big impact
    11 months ago by RHBaker
    Blog
    Cabin / Deck Designs
    Hello, Thinking about deck and pilot house designs. Good thing to do while the glue dries. The attach drawing found on the net is making me think about a front ramp as I like these workboats. Just need to keep in mind that it also needs to be a rescue
    vessel
    . There is always a need to rescue a sailboat at the pond. Joe
    11 months ago by Joe727
    Blog
    Day Two Springer
    Springer build log for website Hello all, Even though I am in the middle of several projects, including refitting two of my boats, I can't resist starting a new one. I am sure that I am not the only one with this affliction, I get bored quickly and jump from project to project. To keep them moving, I mostly work simultaneously. So here goes, my first ever Build Blog, bear with me.... Picked the Springer Tug as it is very simple and it will just be used ss a backup recovery
    vessel
    . I intend to build it a zero cost from my parts box and scrap wood pile. I put together my extra props, driveshaft, gearbox, motor, esc and RX. May have to buy a SLA Battery to get descent run time. Started last evening by making a template based on the plan in photo, credit goes to hull designer, see photo. Then I determined my motor location and Drive Line Angle so I could design the stuffing tube. Constructed that the same night using a 3/16" SS steel drive shaft. Bronze bushings from local hardware store and brass tubing from my supplies. See photos... Had the 500dc motor, Master Airscrew Gearbox, drive shaft, coupler and 2" brass prop. More to come..... Joe Day 2 Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch plywood from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade drill press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. if you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic, woodworking, etc., a good practice is to use this both adhesive and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate adhesive. Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe
    11 months ago by Joe727
    Response
    Rescue
    vessel
    - Springer Tug
    Hello, Next I traced the hull sides on to 12mm/1/2" Baltic birch plywood from Woodcraft store. I nailed two pieces together prior to cutting so as to match. I don't have a scroll saw so I built a table mount for a jigsaw that attaches to my homemade drill press table. Cut them together, but the jigsaw does not cut well in terms of verticality. So I clamped them in a vise and hand sanded till they matched and were at 90 degrees. I showed my simple rig for the sabre saw / jigsaw table. if you need detail, just ask. I also showed my custom made 4 1/2 table that I made because I could not find a scaled down table saw for model making. (Could not afford, I am retired and have a low budget. Glued up the sides and ends tonight with Titebond 3, temporary nails to help hold it into place. Note: As to any joints whether it be electronic, woodworking, etc., a good practice is to use this both adhesive and mechanical fastener. I swear by these as one or the other will eventually fail This is as simple as using a screw, nail or rod, and the appropriate adhesive. Model building, as most will say is cheaper than therapy. Joe
    11 months ago by Joe727
    Response
    Getting Close
    Very interested in your experiences with this
    vessel
    - love to share more. I am currently scratch building one from the original kit plans but have used plank on frame construction and incorporated a detachable keel. Currently fitting the standing rigging. Photo of my efforts attached
    11 months ago by alan20
    Forum
    Ship rudders
    Thanks Doug And bear in mind this
    vessel
    is 6ft 6" in length and about 12" keel to bulwarks so roughly 13ft x 2ft of plate and rivet effect. Bottom gets saw and the eyesight tires. But hopefully the effect will be worth it
    12 months ago by Toby
    Forum
    Nordea research
    Hi This could be the Robbe Nordenay. This was a research
    vessel
    which is well out of production but a nice and impressive work boat. if you google robbe Nordney you will see pictures of her. She was twin screw with a crane to lower a work boat. Regards Kevin
    12 months ago by kevinsharpe
    Media
    March'71
    165footer job from Bangladesh navy. Armed with 1 37mm Chinese naval cannon (which I replaced with type 76F variant), 2 orlicons. Actually used to patrol costal area here , also used in coast guard. The class name is padma class patrol
    vessel
    , designed and made by BN. Tried to make its rc version in 1:110th scale(I'm not great like you guys so please help me do better and suggest me where I can do better). Length 45cm, beam 7cm. Powered with dual 180. The only thing I'm suffering is motor shaft connectoΕ•. Those two universal joints I bought are not good enough for smooth rotation. They vibrates. So I used silicone tubes. Now I'm using latex rubber tubes . Any suggestions or plan what I can use in peace!πŸ˜†
    12 months ago by Sakibian
    Forum
    PS Waverley
    Hi all, my chum has bought a very large hull of the above ship, but it has no details whatever and absolutely nothing above gunnel level. Can anyone recommend trustworthy plans for the
    vessel
    , Please? Cheers, Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Forum
    HMS M.33
    Phew Doug you're right about the price. Too rich for my pocket I'm afraid. Re the anecdote it's somewhat apochryphal I think as I heard of a similar tale somewhere in the China Sea. The signal was see you in Saigon I think. I don't recall the
    vessel
    s involved though.πŸ‘
    1 year ago by onetenor
    Media
    PBR and Friends
    Another dusk patrol....friendly
    vessel
    s in vicinity....no enemy contact....MTB to maiden soon.πŸ‘
    1 year ago by MSGray
    Forum
    HMS M.33
    Which kit is that Doug.? Looks like a nice
    vessel
    .πŸ‘
    1 year ago by onetenor
    Media
    ''Exuberent'' DH142
    South Devon Crabber :- Cygnus GM 32' 1/12 Scale. Donor hull 32" fitted out/scratch built. Replica of actual
    vessel
    that floundered off Weymouth in 1983. Model build started in 1981 and completed in 2018 !!!
    1 year ago by Ballast
    Forum
    Help required on Boat i.d.
    Hi When you research vosper thornycroft they built many warships for foreign navies, mainly in the Middle East i.e. Oman Malaya etc. if you ok on e bay under vosper you will see photographs of these
    vessel
    s. it. islikely that your model is authentic and was built for a foreign, likely middle eastern navy. Regards Kevin
    1 year ago by kevinsharpe
    Blog
    HMS BRAVE BORDERER
    The weather has quickly turned colder, giving an excuse to get back to this model. Stripped out much of the interior and the prop. shafts to replace the nylon propellers with brass. These items all needed removing for painting, so decided to paint the hull before reassembly and then moving onto the superstructure. Fortunately, examining similar naval
    vessel
    s and several U Tube videos, confirmed the hull as light grey, the deck a darker one of the 50 shades of grey and the lower hull below the waterline black. Used thin Tamiya masking tape to define clean colour separations, followed by regular tape, masked the hull into colour sections and sprayed using β€œrattle” cans. After the colours applied a light overall Matt coat to subdue any shine. The results are satisfactory. Will now reassemble and move onto building the superstructure and the other fittings. Prior to the season closing decided to experiment with my new Flysky Tx/Rx package, shortly to be fitted to this model. This Tx has a servo limiting function, which was hoping could also be used to restrict ESC output. Would like to make the full speed motor response correspond to full Tx control position. Currently can over power the model; which lifts the stern, causing it to come off the plane and then dig the bow in. Was thinking that if full throttle could be set at around 90% forward control movement and 40% sternwards the model would retain adequate performance, but without being overpowered or very sensitive to control lever movement. As the Brave was not available, tried the idea on my Daman Stan 4207 model. This is brushed motor powered and a good performer. Obviously the settings for the Brave will be different, but at least could try to see if the idea would work – it did! This Tx function is easy to use and adjustments can be made whilst the model is on the water. Once the ideal settings are achieved they can be programmed and then retained in the Tx. Will try this on the Brave when back on the water next Spring.
    1 year ago by RHBaker
    Forum
    HMS Campbeltown 1941, 1/96 scale
    Hi Steve, On my Manxman, a fast cruiser / minelayer, it was used to protect the deck where mines were dragged from the stores to the laying rails in the stern. Otherwise I've never seen extensive use of it on open decks. Mostly just in enclosed areas where there would be a lot of 'foot traffic'. In recent years (decades!?) I've seen blue, yellow and green versions inside the
    vessel
    , especially in the so called 'Citadel', a protected area which can be hermetically sealed against chemical or biological attack! 😲 The 'non slip' variants on the weather decks all seem to be paint / resin mixtures containing some sort of abrasive material. I don't think it is worth the effort you describe to depict corticene!! Cheers, Doug
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Paints
    Hmm! Let's 'Cut to the chase'! First; I've never been on a ship, naval or civil, and I've been on a few during my 30 odd year career designing COMMS systems for ships, mostly naval, that used gloss paints OR matt paints. Matt paint, whether for scale or full size, rapidly shows the wear marks where folks tread or grab or where we habitually grab it on models. This rapidly creates a shiny effect, like the seat of your favourite, most comfortable and ancient trousers (which the Missus probably wanted to throw out years ago but you are fighting a REARguard action) 😁 During WW2 the emphasis was on reducing the reflectivity of paints on warships. Gloss on a ship / boat MAY not look any different from satin or matt at a distance BUT; it will reflect sunlight and flash which attracts attention and betrays the presence of the
    vessel
    . Furthermore gloss shows the wear and tear marks much sooner than satin. Whether matt paints were available or not in those days I don't know, but even if they were I don't think they would have been used after the initial durability tests on board. Having seen the paint part numbers, all BS381C xxx, specified on the Thornycroft 'blueprints' that Martin sent me, I would say that the paint colours you need Morkullen are RN Light Weatherworks grey BS381C 676 = Colour Coats M01 RN Dark Admiralty grey BS381C 632 = Colour Coats M16 RN Light Admiralty grey BS381C 697= Colour Coats M23 See page 3 of the colour chart, see attached colour charts from Sovereign Hobbies for their Colour Coats paints, which have been derived from original Admiralty paint chips.. Colour Coats are enamel. If you prefer acrylic try Life Colour set CS33 Royal Navy WW2 Set 1. See page 6 of attached Life Colour catalogue. Happy painting, don't forget to post pics / vids of the resultsπŸ‘ Cheers, Doug 😎 PS have a look at the recent HMS Campbeltown 1/96 thread for further detail of the recent discussion on WW2 RN paints. BTW; if I feel after painting that the finish is still too glossy I give it a blast of Lord Nelson satin, or in extreme cases, matt clear varnish. Otherwise I agree with Reilly's commentsπŸ‘
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Forum
    Paints
    My point was that real
    vessel
    s of that era didn't get matt paint as it wasn't strictly available. They had satin or, as they called it, "non gloss". For anything. I'm not remotely interested in warships of any sort, but I do know about paints and they could only use what was available. Martin
    1 year ago by Westquay
    Response
    Bulwark Stays
    Hi Mike, tedious jobπŸ€” but the build's looking goodπŸ‘ BTW: by sheer coincidence yesterday i saw a documentary on National Geographic about Commander Robert Peary, an American explorer who claimed to have been the first person to reach the geographic North Pole. Your ship was named after him. "SS Robert E. Peary was a Liberty ship which gained fame during World War II for being built in a shorter time than any other such
    vessel
    . Named after, Commander Robert Peary, an American explorer who claimed to have been the first person to reach the geographic North Pole. She was launched on November 12, 1942 just 4 days, 15 hours and 29 minutes after the keel was laid down." https://www.wikiwand.com/en/SS_Robert_E._Peary Pronounced 'Peery' So if you're fitting nameplates .....! Cheers, Doug 😎
    1 year ago by RNinMunich
    Response
    solar
    I wanted to demonstrate that a
    vessel
    could move due to the power of the sun alone.Introducing a battery would confuse the issue and sceptical people would claim that it was the battery doing all the work !! Cheers
    1 year ago by lesliebreame
    Blog
    Scimitar-class patrol
    vessel
    Two
    vessel
    in it class (1) HMS Scimitar (2) HMS Sabre Launched: December 1992 Displacement: 24,000Β kg Builder: Portsmouth Armament: 2 Γ— General purpose machine guns (stern-mounted) Complement: 7 (1 officer, 6 ratings) Gibraltar Squadron's two Scimitar-class boats are the smallest commissioned
    vessel
    s in the Royal Navy. This build was to produce a fun semi scale racing boat, I have always liked the Archer class boats cabin design. So after finding a suitable hull, an old 'Models by Design' GRP moulding I was away with the rest of the build. Striped out all old fittings and remnants removed excess glue. Added strakes to the hull to add lift for planning and control. Produced a semi scale deck and cabin from light ply. Thanks for your interest Roy
    1 year ago by CB90


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