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>> Home > Tags > acrylic

acrylic
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acrylic
Paints by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 days ago
Hmm! Let's 'Cut to the chase'! First; I've never been on a ship, naval or civil, and I've been on a few during my 30 odd year career designing COMMS systems for ships, mostly naval, that used gloss paints OR matt paints. Matt paint, whether for scale or full size, rapidly shows the wear marks where folks tread or grab or where we habitually grab it on models. This rapidly creates a shiny effect, like the seat of your favourite, most comfortable and ancient trousers (which the Missus probably wanted to throw out years ago but you are fighting a REARguard action) 😁 During WW2 the emphasis was on reducing the reflectivity of paints on warships. Gloss on a ship / boat MAY not look any different from satin or matt at a distance BUT; it will reflect sunlight and flash which attracts attention and betrays the presence of the vessel. Furthermore gloss shows the wear and tear marks much sooner than satin. Whether matt paints were available or not in those days I don't know, but even if they were I don't think they would have been used after the initial durability tests on board. Having seen the paint part numbers, all BS381C xxx, specified on the Thornycroft 'blueprints' that Martin sent me, I would say that the paint colours you need Morkullen are RN Light Weatherworks grey BS381C 676 = Colour Coats M01 RN Dark Admiralty grey BS381C 632 = Colour Coats M16 RN Light Admiralty grey BS381C 697= Colour Coats M23 See page 3 of the colour chart, see attached colour charts from Sovereign Hobbies for their Colour Coats paints, which have been derived from original Admiralty paint chips.. Colour Coats are enamel. If you prefer acrylic try Life Colour set CS33 Royal Navy WW2 Set 1. See page 6 of attached Life Colour catalogue. Happy painting, don't forget to post pics / vids of the results👍 Cheers, Doug 😎 PS have a look at the recent HMS Campbeltown 1/96 thread for further detail of the recent discussion on WW2 RN paints. BTW; if I feel after painting that the finish is still too glossy I give it a blast of Lord Nelson satin, or in extreme cases, matt clear varnish. Otherwise I agree with Reilly's comments👍

Paints by Morkullen Petty Officer   Posted: 10 days ago
I am a bit stuck as to what type of paints to use on my Thornycroft MTB. Do I use gloss or matt? What type of paint is suggested Acrylic, emulsion, etc? Who can supply - say - 250ml of any recommended paint as I will probably need to apply at least two coats. I have already applied sanding sealer and undercoat and now need finishing paints. One for under hull and t'other for topsides. Any suggestions for a supplier would be greatly appreciated.

Where's our mate?... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
Hi peter, 'Deck Blue' changed a few times over the years, there are lighter and darker shades depending on the theatre of operations and if detection from the air was paramount or not. Later in the war, when the axis air forces were largely destroyed and the allies had overwhelming air superiority the emphasis moved to the vertical surfaces to confuse subs and the few remaining surface ships the axis had. Then the emphasis switched back to the horizontal surfaces when the Kamikaze attacks developed. So probably the lighter Pacific variant is what you need for USS Kid at the end of the war. You are lucky that Kidd has been preserved as a museum ship in her 'end of war' state 👍 If you Google USS Kidd I'm sure you'll find the museum site with more colour pics. Also, the display on different web sites will depend on many variables, for instance:- How the sample was photographed; white balance, colour balance, lighting; intensity and type - Kelvin temperature etc. How the photos are digitally interpreted and integrated in the web site. The times of 'The camera never lies' are unfortunately long over! Added to that is how your PC or Dumbphone/tablet displays the web site, similar problems;- Type of display, colour / contrast / brilliance settings etc etc. Power saving settings can affect these! If I were you I would use the Measure 22 scheme as shown on the colour pic and described on the Wiki page. That's apparently what the USN went back to when the kamikaze attacks started. Your basic choice is enamel = Colour Coats, or Acrylic = LifeColor 😉 Personally, I would go for the 1944 dazzle scheme cos it's more interesting and unusual, but then I'm just NUTS! 😁 Cheers, Doug 😎 PS Hofbrauhaus is for the tourists! I've been there maybe three times in 38 years? Once on my very first visit to Munich in 1980, then, after I started working here in 1985, only with customers who insisted on going there. Too loud and expensive, there are many better, less touristic, ones in Munich. Prost allseits! PPS haven't been to the Oktoberfest for years for similar reasons! 30 years ago it was still fun, but not now 🤔

Where's our mate?... by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
Evenin' Peter, Thanks 😉 Not quite 100% yet but getting there. Fit enough to answer your question I think, mainly cos I just bought a bunch of RN and USN paints meself😁 First off, have a shufti at this link, it details all 'Measures' up to # 23 near the end of the Pacific war. There's also a colour pic of USS Kidd wearing Measure 22 which was used on Destroyer Escorts (DE) at the time. https://www.wikiwand.com/en/World_War_II_ship_camouflage_mea... In 1944 it was replaced by a Dazzle pattern on the Fletchers, Measure 32, similar to RN Western Approaches pattern, until 1945 when they reverted to Measure 22 but with the revised Haze Gray. https://www.wikiwand.com/en/World_War_II_US_Navy_dazzle_camo... I also attach attach a colour chart from Sovereign Hobbies who took over the White Ensign Colour Coats range of navy enamel paints. Have a look at page 6. They are made by Snyder & Short from authentic Navy Paint Chips apparently. I just bought a bunch of them in RN colours for my 'Plastic Magic' conversions. Get 'em here- https://www.sovereignhobbies.co.uk/collections/colourcoats-s... If you prefer acrylic have a look at the LifeColor Sets # CS24 and CS25 'US Navy WWII'. Chart and catalogue attached. get here for instance- https://www.waylandgames.co.uk/lifecolor-paint-sets/43947-us... Happy painting, cheers, Doug 😎

HMS Campbeltown 1941, 1/96 scale by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 24 days ago
Hi Steve, I'll see what i can do. No promises as the range of Acrylics is somewhat more limited as far as Naval colours goes. One way out is to buy some Naval Paint Chips from Snyder & Short. http://www.shipcamouflage.com/royal_navy1.htm These are taken from the original chips of admiralty paints used to mix the Colour Coats enamel colours. Enables mixing to suit from more basic 'standard' colours. Bit of 'mix it and see' involved. Testors acrylics may be a better bet. They do some Naval colours. Also recommended by the HMS Hood Association. For instance; this would be good for hull and upperworks https://www.hobbylinc.com/testors-model-master-507-c-light-g... style='background-color:yellow;'>acrylic-paint-4870 This for the decks? https://www.hobbylinc.com/testors-model-master-light-sea-gra... style='background-color:yellow;'>acrylic-paint-4759 There are also some excellent tips on painting scale warships here😉 http://www.hmshood.com/hoodtoday/models/tips/hoodpaint.htm I've just been studying this for my 1/350 Hood, and just ordered a batch of suitable Colour Coats to paint her 'As Sunk' 😭 Cheers, Doug 😎

HMS Campbeltown 1941, 1/96 scale by cormorant Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
Just had a look at the colours you suggest on the Colour Coats chart and they would fit the bill. Looking at the Life Colour charts I can't see anything that's close. My ideal would be acrylics and I see you have a conversion chart for Tamiya, which I believe are acrylic. Can you convert M23 and RN06 please? Thanks. Steve

HMS Campbeltown 1941, 1/96 scale by cormorant Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
Hi Doug Just had a look at Life Colour which on first sight would suit me better with the acrylic paints. Here is my first attempt at scratch building. Nothing glued down yet as I have still got plenty to do before I can put the deck in place. The funnels are cigar tubes and I have a smoker in 2 and 4. I decided to lash out on 3D printed main armament but I still need to make the gun shields. Thanks for your help and advice so far and best of luck with your 1/350 - hope you will keep me updated on progress. Cheers Steve

Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Just got white metal castings back of the Chris Craft fittings and very nice they are too. They have started to burnish up a treat and will polish well as Paul uses a good quality metal. Nice and hard. Now I have to make the light lenses. Also put the blue bottom on her at the weekend using my one and only pot of Plastikote enamel paint, not the acrylic muck they've turned over to and it went on through my spray gun as smooth as could be. Even my masking worked. Just waiting for a gold pin stripe tape for the boot topping now. The final bit will be masking the deck to paint the covering boards and king plank with the same blue. For those not lucky enough to have a wee pot of proper Plastikote in the paint cupboard, I also got a couple of tins of Rustoleum spray, only 5-25 a pot, enamel (of course) in a nice French blue and a rich cream. These colours will look good on my Darby One Design single stepper "WHO'S DARBY?". Very post War. I think the Oulton Broad One Design single stepper will be Burgundy and the Whippet One Design will be varnished mahogany. I know of no other classes of British stepped hydroplanes. These will all be 1/6th scale as they're all around 12-13 ft. long. I'll probably put the same motors in them eventually. The Darby is well advanced and has a Speed 400, but I may go brushless. Any suggestions for a cheap Brushless/ESC combo will be welcome for, say, 3S Li-Pos. It would be good to see these period boats all racing together. I also plan to make reverse clinker Singer cadet and a Percy See Bugatti engined boat for which I have plans. I'm hoping to get a response from the current keepers of Berylla II about measuring that, too, since it also uses a Lea Francis engine, like the Whippet.

Italeri P.T 109 by boaty Admiral   Posted: 1 month ago
I bought an Italeri PT109 kit in 2011. It took 4 months to build as I had other projects on at the time. I notices the high quality of the parts, especially the hull and the actual paint finish was very easy due to it being plastic and got the nearest colour match by using Humbrol spray acrylic of Grass Green with Regency Red acrylic for the waterline and below. Difficult decision was as to build as a triple screw to maintain scale or go for the single screw. I eventually went for the latter with just one rudder. Power was by a 480 brushed flight motor with a 30 amp esc which was a bit over the top as power was by a 2200mAh 2S Lipo but the esc was the only one they had in the shop. Getting the motor installed was very straight forward as it was done before the deck was fitted but I had to make the aft cabin detachable for access to taking the battery in and out and also lubricating the propshaft .The boat performed well at scale speed but got slightly out of shape when full power was applied, appearing more as a fast electric. Overall the boat was ideal for smaller ponds (providing it was not running flat out). The outcome was a well detailed model that appeared like the real thing on the water but I would not recommend sailing it in rough conditions.. Boaty😁

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by pittsfieldpete Lieutenant   Posted: 3 months ago
Thanks, Doug. I really like the idea of simply using the exact same white LED for everything, including all of the colored LEDs currently on the boat. Coloring each LED the appropriate colors is the ideal solution. Glass lacquer is a great idea, plus Tamiya makes a translucent or semi-opaque acrylic paint available in many colors. Paints are ideal because I can control the depth of color simply by applying more coats. Another plus is that I can replace the somewhat cheesy looking port & starboard sidelights with more realistic ones. I like it! Will you please rework things as necessary to account for white LEDs as I’ve described? Things are coming together beautifully. Thanks, Pete

The Lone Ranger Rides Again or Hull Finishing ;-)) by MouldBuilder Captain   Posted: 3 months ago
Hi Doug. After spraying, how long is the minimum time before removing the masking tape. Acrylic paints used. Thanks.😉

46Firefloat Mk2 paint by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
Unless described as flat, paint was more often a brighter satin than matt and rarely actual gloss. White will always have been an off white as the components of paints were such that it was not possible to get a really bright white. I know that for a fact as my grandad always made his own and until PEP in the mid 60s (Plastic Emulsion Paint) there was no such thing as brilliant or appliance white. Unfortunately getting an decent off white is not easy these days since Plastikote went acrylic and their previously excellent paints started eating themselves on recoating. I now use enamels exclusively. They are densely pigmented, flexible and modern enamels dry pretty quickly. I am using a black enamel primer on my Crash Tender, which I will then spray with black "gloss" from the same range, which, once thinned with white spirit, will dry a little less than glossy. I still don't have a matt brick red for the undersides, but it can be made matt-ish with a careful rub down with 1000 grit wet and dry used wet and soapy, but be careful not to sand through, so very lightly does it, even 1000 grit can cut well when new. Decks were said to be Cerrux Light Deck Grey, anti-slip, which means a textured surface. That would be darker looking due to the surface texture's way with the light. The cabin sides were described as "smooth", i.e. same as the decks but not anti-slip. The roofs? Well, on Vosper's drawing "white" is crossed through and "Grey" written in. But, some pics do look white, the best pics look darker by a whisker than the sides and the roofs are clearly textured as they show evidence, as do the decks, of filth which will sit in the texture. You choose. NOBODY has yet given us chapter and verse. The fact is, an already very handsome boat looks so very pretty with white roofs. But they too should be off white if you can get it! Good luck. Fittings, btw can be had from SLEC in Watton in white metal. Basically the old Yeoman fittings, masters now owned by IP Engineering who bought them to cast when they owned Vintage Model Boat Company. Now they've sold that to SLEC, but I don't think SLEC have white metal casting facilities, so probably cast by Ivor still. I have just had a set for my birthday and they're excellent. They do need careful cleaning up as in mould lines need to be filed/scraped/sanded to a decent finish and then given good primered surface. No hook though, but it does include nav and riding lights. This site also has masts for sale in plastic, but I made my own in brass as I will the hook and davit. I have also just had a set of crew figures cast from my patterns and they will be available soon...a driver(Helm), a boss with binoculars and a lazy slob laying around in the after cockpit. Needs a roll-up to finish his look. No idea of price yet as don't know how much rubber to mould or resin to cast for a set. Yes, 1/16th scale. All this to finish a model I had 55 years ago! But I reckon it deserves it. Martin

54 year old Crash Tender by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Boaty, it's amazing how many people HAD Taycol motors, but don't anymore, apart from our chum Doug in Munich. And I'll pick his brains later maybe for info on controlling the Taycol Supermarine in the Crash Tender. Then again, I might just set it off on one pack for slowish and switch in another for faster. I ain't into reverse. Boats don't go backuds. I've had enough real ones to know that! Two of those didn't have any gears. One had a clutch and the other didn't even have that. It starts, it goes, quickish! Always had a paddle handy in the Albatross! I'm not really into the boat club festivals of steering round stuff or backing into docks, so why trouble myself with ESCs which seem to fail often still and weren't around when I had the boat originally. I have gel cells, but the damned things have all gone dead on me, so I might see about Nimh packs when the time comes. I went to get some one shot cellulose putty to fill the cracks and grain bits and the old nail head dips. But my favourite auto paint shop said they hadn't sold it in ages and offered me some acrylic crap in a tube. Not a bloody chance!!! "Gimme the thickest brushing primer you got and it better be cellulose". Yeah, got that, he said. "So why ain't you got stopper?" No answer. Anyway I get this stuff home and it's thick, cellulose (skin forming after 3 minutes) and bang on the right shade of light grey for a Crash Tender. I shall experiment with my Chinchila dust next for the non-slip areas and mix a pot of the primer with a bit of white to do the cabin sides, when I finish spray. For the moment, I very quickly slapped it on with a brush and will leave it for today to harden then start a very big, dusty, rub down session tomorrow. OK a litre of primer ain't cheap, but it's cheaper from a car paint suppliers and it's bang on colour. It'll also do a LOT of boats! I have a black primer in enamel for Vanity, which will also go on the sides of the Crash tender, followed by black gloss enamel, but's a way down the road yet. Talking of old stuff boaty, the white enamel my dad insisted on painting the boat back in the early 60s is hard as rock! He used to get it by the 20 gallon can from a "mate on the docks". We had docks in those days. Dad called it ship enamel. We all knew what he meant. Our entire house was shades of pastel tinted ship enamel! Tints courtesy of another mate on the docks. He had a lot of mates on the docks. It was difficult to be a Cockney family and not have mates on the docks! Pics later of the slapped on grey primer, which, I should say, argued a bit with the sanding sealer. Nuffin' a good rub down won't sort out. Martin

Painting by Flack Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
I have always used rattle cans from Halfords and or The Range. Beware of mixing different types of paints i.e. cellulose, acrylic and enamel. I have had a disaster with mixing paints that took weeks to strip the hull back to sort out.

Seeing the light by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
BTW; re your query about filler and acrylic paints:- Any 'standard' polyester type filler will do but be sure to let it cure completely so that all the 'smelly' components, including peroxide from the hardener have evaporated. For small surface nicks I often use 'Green Putty' or Revell 'Plasto'. Doesn't need mixing and is very fine and smooth and NO PONG😊 Then apply a primer to match the top coat paint you are using. happy filling, cheers Doug 😎