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>> Home > Tags > acrylic

acrylic
cyanoacrylate
acrylic
How do I resolve my varnish problem? by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 13 days ago
@ Vic, hi if the wood starts to swell it was too wet and the water soaked in 🤔 I use a flat dense sponge damped only, wiped against the grain. But in John's case this now seems to be academic. Looks like he's heading towards paint! (Back to the acrylic/ enamel discussion ?? 😲) @ John; whatever,I hope it is still 'fun' to do and you don't despair and jack it in. Cheers 😎

Finishing by Westquay Captain   Posted: 16 days ago
If you put a question out there, you'll get an answer. At least you will from me if I know about it and I know about paint. Why on earth do you say acrylic can be put over anything UNLIKE cellulose or enamel. Cellulose maybe, but enamel? You can put enamel over anything. I can even get cellulose over almost anything with my spray gun, but I know how to mist it on. I suggested enamel because it is so completely harmless. Cellulose, apart from mixed Halfords and Zero Paints is no longer available. Acrylic as you know can react even with itself. It doesn't have good pigments and doesn't cover well. Enamel does. I was well aware that the original post was from a new member, so I figured he deserved a straight answer. Not everyone wants a matt or even a satin finish on a model boat if it isn't a Warship or a service vessel. Would you put satin varnish on a Greavette or a Chris Craft, matt paint on a model of a luxury yacht of any age? Of course not. This nonsense about scale effect is just that....nonsense. A shine's a shine whether smaller or larger, otherwise where do you stop? Martin

Finishing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 16 days ago
Martin The original post was from a new member asking for help on finishing and painting. There are pros and cons with whatever you choose and for a new modeller it can be very confusing. I have used all kinds of paints either brushed or sprayed but now prefer to use Acrylic as (in my opinion) it needs less preparation, dries quickly and is less prone to runs. Unlike cellulose or enamel it can be painted over most prepared surfaces and has a nice flat finish suitable for a scale model boat. Your Sea Urchin looks splendid but when it was built that was the only paint available so the restoration is spot on. Dave

ATF Zuni by wcolombo Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 16 days ago
ATF Zuni fleet tug. The model in the 1/48 scale is 120 cm long and has light, smoke and sounds functions. Made from American Navy blue prints. The hull is in fiberglass and the superstructure is in acrylic laser cut.

Finishing by Westquay Captain   Posted: 16 days ago
That's why I counselled caution with anything over acrylic...including, as it happens, acrylic. HRG enamels take a very short time to dry. In fact so much so that they sell a decelerator to slow drying time to maintain a wet edge. Very important when you're painting a narrow boat by hand, although a lot of people then use Owatrol mixed in with the enamel. I sprayed HRG enamel, thinned with white spirit and I sprayed all the parts of a kit car with it. It dried the same afternoon and was handleable the next day with ease. Needless to say it glossed beautifully, being enamel. Spray cans can be OK, but are very expensive for what they re and NEVER use over acrylic as they will wrinkle. What goes in those cans ain't pure water based acrylic, trust me. For one thing, it stinks a fair bit. I've painted enough slot car bodies to know that and what Halfords mix for you is pure, stinks-of-peardrops cellulose, whatever they might tell you. None of them know a fraction of we old painty farts know! If you can afford them, I would recommend Zero paints. They're formulated to be airbrush ready, need no thinning and are to quote the man that makes them, "cellulose only different". I did a 3 foot model narrow boat for somebody and they went on beautifully out of my Paasche Model H single mix airbrush (all you need). In fact I have also used them from my spotting gun (cheap as chips and easy to clean, IF you have a compressor). Zeros mask well too. Problem is he won't post and wants a fortune for courier. I won't play that game when I just had 2 deliveries of epoxy resin through the post. I have recently used Tamiya spray cans that were given to me (yes I really AM that tight) and they are excellent, but then, they really are cellulose. I wish I could buy cellulose, but it allegedly isn't made these days...Hmmmm. Something ending in "...ocks" comes to mind. I'd honestly stick to enamels bought from a car paint suppliers. Their wet'n'dry is cheaper too. Always talk to the organ grinder himself, never his monkey, hence auto refinishers' suppliers. Martin

Finishing by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 16 days ago
I would never use enamel over an acrylic based paint as it will over time crinkle. You can use acrylic over enamel but I do agree that Plastikote is best avoided as I have had similar unfortunate incidents with crinkling. If you are painting a fibreglass or plastic surface then the acrylic (not cellulose based) rattle cans will give a quick and satisfactory finish and can be protected with a clear mat or silk lacquer. If you have a wooden hull then enamel may be a better choice as it will absorb the oil and aid the drying process. In my experience enamel can take some time to dry especially if you are banished to an outbuilding due to the smell. Whatever you choose careful preparation and taking your time will give the best result. Happy building and painting Dave

Finishing by Westquay Captain   Posted: 16 days ago
Easily done these days. If you have started with acrylic, rub it down and try some of your chosen enamel over the top. It might crinkle. That's what acrylic does. I had some Plastikote crinkle in reaction to itself! I checked the pot to discover that this once great paint company had gone all water based and their paint is now junk. I rung them up and blasted them down the phone and they sent me the last 4 pots of off-white enamel in the place! That went on a treat and, with the dark red that I used on our canal boat, the Sea Urchin was restored back to her 58 year old original finish. https://model-boats.com/media/np/s/200/1494148536 Martin

Finishing by stwdv Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 16 days ago
Great many thanks Martin, 1st mistake started using acrylic will stop now 👍

Finishing by Westquay Captain   Posted: 16 days ago
Yes, stay away from acrylic, water-based muck. Stick with enamels. The best of which are those made by HMG. They can also be sprayed with wonderfully smooth results. For wood, cellulose sanding sealer flatted back and then good spar or yacht varnish. General rule with paint?....The more it stinks the better it is. Acrylic doesn't stink much...QED. Martin

The boat hooks. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 23 days ago
I stumbled on the boat hooks whilst scouring eBay for some other bits and bobs, they came as a set of three but the poles were too short to be scale accurate but I bought a set anyway and replaced the supplied poles with some 3mm mahogany dowel of the right scale length. The hooks themselves are made of white metal and are quite delicate so some care was needed in cleaning them up for painting. I etch primed them first and then brush painted them with some silver metallic acrylic before epoxy fixing them to the poles which I had sprayed with a satin finish lacquer. The retaining brackets were made from some 22 gauge brass cut into a 3mm strip and formed into a lipped retainer. These brackets were pierced to take a 1mm brass dome head pin which was soft soldered in place and then etch primed and brush painted with ‘gun metal’ grey acrylic. A 1mm hole was drilled into the cabin sides in the correct positions according to the drawings and the brackets glued in place. The brackets retain the poles quite firmly and I think they give the boat some interesting detail 😁

Ketch Irene by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 28 days ago
The cunning plan for the sails. Heming & stitching is difficult to get anywhere near to scale, unless the scale is large. So I experimented with the flying jib, worked very well. Except I have the bolt rope on the wrong side. I had tried this on glass before but the glue puddled showing badly. Using the Paper pattern cut out the cloth ( I use ticking) With at least 1/2" all around. Mine was washed & ironed. This was because it has been folded in a drawer since the last boat. Cut 4 Teflon blocks & drilled 2 holes ( Teflon cut from an old chopping board). A panel pin through holes one up one down. Place paper pattern on a board, nail the blocks so the nail sticking up is on the point. The other nail is clear of pattern, this will allow the block to pivot. Wind a string that has been soaked in PVA (water resistant type) around the nails. The cloth is slightly dampened with a spray, not to much or it will be to heavy & also the glue could run. Push the nails up through the cloth letting it sag again not to much. When dry remove it from board, cut off the excess cloth as tight as possible to the string. I then mark the panels with pencil. I do this on both sides, after the first side I tape it to the window so I can see & get them the same. Then give sail a coat of very watery coat of PVA, some mixed with acrylic paint. Seen on my model Flying Foam I had over done it a bit.

Planking...part 1. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
As a novice boat builder I have never done any planking before but after seeing some fine examples on other crash tender decks and read other blog descriptions of the process I thought I’d give it a try as it would be more pleasing to the eye than a plain painted surface. I’m not sure how true to the prototype the planking is on a RAF Crash Tender as it’s not described in the Vosper documentation but I think some ‘modelling licence’ is justified for the visual effect. The choice of materials, planking sizing and the method of ‘caulking’ were all studied in detail in the blogs and discussions and I finally decided on 7mm x 1.5mm maple for the planking and some .7mm black plasticard cut into fine strips for the caulking. All the required materials were ordered from Cornwall Model Boats and all arrived remarkably quickly packed in a long cardboard tube two days later… very good service and quality materials! I made a practice piece to test the process and materials before committing it to the boat, I used a teak stain on the wood as a test as well but decided I preferred the natural colour of the maple after it was lacquered with a few coats of satin finish. When I felt I was sufficiently proficient to start for real I elected to do the relatively small area of the tow hook deck first. This was marked out to get the correct centering of the planks and I commenced with the application of a 5mm border with mitred corners and the plasticard caulking strips on the inside edges. The maple planking is very easy to cut and trim and Is also reasonably consistent in width and thickness. I’m using a medium cyano glue for all of this as it grabs very quickly so that I can work at a reasonable pace but my finger-tips unavoidably end up getting stuck occasionally too 😡 Working from the centre line outwards the maple strips and caulking were fixed down, the final outer pieces on each side needed to be slightly wider to fill the space but the difference is barely noticeable. The ‘caulking ‘ was carefully trimmed flush with the deck with a very sharp half inch chisel and the whole surface sanded smooth. Several coats of acrylic satin lacquer were then applied by brush as I decided it would be easier than masking up the surrounding areas. Buoyed by the success of this I think I'll do the mid-deck and the cockpit too 😁

Deck fittings, portholes and a door knob ! by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
Now that the painting is finished I can start putting on some of the white metal deck fittings. I had previously cleaned these up with a file and wire wool and sprayed them all with etch primer, some were drilled to take threaded studs to fix them through the deck or as a reinforcement for epoxy glue fixing into the deck, and some pierced to take a short fixing pin. The chain pipe was drilled out to make it look more realistic. They were all brush painted with some Tamiya metallic acrylic paint, I chose ‘gun metal’ for this as I want to paint some other fittings and window frames with a metallic silver finish as a contrast. The portholes were painted with the same colour as the cabin sides and glazed with the perspex that was supplied with the kit, 'canopy glue' was used for this as I read that cyano glue would 'mist' the plastic. Another small detail I thought to add was a brass knob for the cabin door, this was hand turned from some brass rod and drilled out to take a 2mm threaded stud for fixing through the door. A nice little finishing detail I think, and I'm quite enjoying working with brass 😁

Small plastic joinery glue by Hybrid Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 2 months ago
If you have any plastic that needs glueing and waterproof and only has a small contact point the stufff to use is something called plexsis acrylic comes in a 2part compound and mixed in the nosel as it is squeeze out. It's the best thing out there. I build super yachts for 20 years now for the rich and famous and we use a lot of it on boats that are in the 20 to 30 million prise range . There are some different types rock hard. To ones with a bit of flexibility all dry with in 10 to 15 mins thanks for reading and I do hope this will help people with problems ..... master b Wright

Wheelhouse roof detail....and a paint problem ! by jarvo Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
HI Rob, yes an airbrush is the way to go, I have 2, a normal airbrush and a mini spray gun for large areas, get my paint made up at an auto paint shop in Stockport, take the colour you want and the match and mix, either ready to spray or plain acrylic paint. P.S. Get a compressor with a tank, no spluttering and a constant flow of air