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>> Home > Tags > battery mount

battery mount
engine mount
motor mount
rudder mount
battery
battery life
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battery mount
Huge liner model from 1929 by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Thanks Commodore,👍 I'm going to use a 2V SLA battery, as normal for firing up the Glo motors. I was wondering about ignition time needed and burn out of the plug coil. Just have to experiment I suppose, trick will be to limit the amount of oxygen getting to the coil I guess. Was planning to mass produce the Depthcharges from balsa dowel. Maybe I could 'scoop 'em up' with my tug or fishing cutter😁 Cheers, Doug 😎

Launch ELAINE, by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Colin, As discussed on the phone; 2V grid bias, 90V anode supply! In those days they had 90V dry batteries, they musta run it 'sumow'! 😁 Don't give up so easy! Nowadays how about a 24S LiPo? Or even Martin's 'big box' solution. http://www.batterysupports.com/lion-lipo-nbsp-88v-nbsp-24s-c... 24V chargers / balancers won't be cheap though🤔 2V is no sweat; 2V SLA, a la Glow Plug starter. How big is the boat an' how much weight can she carry? My first car radio was an ancient Echo valve job, with an inductive inverter bolted under the dash to produce the 90-100v for the bottles. Took me ages to find a way to mount it so it didn't make the whole dash hum like a swarm of bees😲 Later there was briefly a generation of 'low voltage' valves. Soon superseded by transistors from 1948 on. (And NO I'm not pre '48 vintage, well not quite!😉) Looking forward to your progress reports. Would really love to witness one of your displays. Please keep me posted about dates. All the best to you both, Cheers, Doug 😎 PS building a transmitter to match won't be easy. A TX on the right frequency is relatively easy, the tricky bit is the 'modulation' for the control functions! Hats off to your guy 'up the road' if he manages it! I'd really really love to see THAT!

Sea Trials and mods. by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
It’s been a while since the boat had it’s maiden voyage on the lake at St. Albans and I’m pleased to report that it looks really good in the water and goes like stink if you open up the throttle. Sadly I still don’t have any decent video of the boat yet as I can’t film and drive the thing at the same time, but I do have some static wide shots from my GoPro. When I do the video I’ll ask a cameraman mate to do the honours, maybe I’ll put the GoPro on the bow and then the stern to get some low action shots…the storyboard is already building in my head!! These early runs were great as they showed up some minor problems that needed attending to. I found that it needed ballasting slightly as it was not sitting on the waterline evenly from side to side so I flattened out some old lead water pipe and cut it into small sections so that I could add ballast incrementally. I did this in the ‘domestic test tank’ and once I was happy the lead pieces were fixed in place inside the hull with some super strong double sided tape. The ESC needed a little programming adjustment because I had forgotten to set the low battery level point to ‘off’ as I am using NiMh batteries and not LiPo’s , that was the cause of the short initial run time on the first outing…..DOH !! The batteries are now held in place by Velcro straps on some bearers that I added, otherwise a battery change involved cutting cable ties and replacing them at the lakeside…not very practical. The volt/amp/watt meter is also now on a proper bracket so that the display is more readable. I have also changed the charging connection from the nasty Tamiya connector to a nice little panel mount XT 60 connector that HobbyKing sell, it comes with a handy blanking plug that I have drilled for a retaining cord. I have also finally got around to upgrading the firmware on my Turnigy i6 radio to the 10 channel version so that I can assign the lighting to the switches properly and have the rotation of the searchlight on one of the two rotary knobs. I can use the old 6 channel RX in the new boat….blog coming soon.

Hull Pt2: Motorisation - Come What May!! by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
As promised (or threatened?😁) stage two of the hull work and thoughts on motorisation. The hull was sprayed with two coats of grey primer/filler. Pic1. As usual this showed up the remaining imperfections (pics 2 & 3), but I'm not going to worry about them until I've got prop shaft tube and rudder stock sorted out and permanently fitted 😉 After my attempts to make and thread a 3mm prop shaft went awry Martin (Westway the Mechanicals Master👍) stepped in and made me a decent one complete with a bushed stuffing tube 👍 Vielen Dank Meister😊 I did however manage to make a 4mm to 3mm reducer so that I could fit a Rabeosch 35mm prop as seen in pics 2 & 3. The tube and shaft from Martin, arrived Saturday an' he only made it on Monday😊, have been dry fitted so that I can start setting up the gears, necessary to bring the drive down to the prop shaft fitted very low down in the hull, and motor mount. Pic 4. Motorisation: (Remember folks - this kit was designed and built as a static model!) I want to use the old 1950s Taycol Target motor which my Dad originally fitted in the Sea Scout which I have renovated and upgraded to brushless. See Build blog 'Sea Scout - Jessica' Many of you will know that the Taycol motors were field coil motors, meaning that they have no permanent magnet around the rotor coil, and thus reversing the battery connections to the brushes had no effect on the direction of rotation, as this simply reversed the magnetic fields of both stator and rotor coils🤔 To counteract this so that the motor could be used in both forward and reverse with a conventional brushed ESC I modified the motor slightly (separated the two coils) and built a simple converter board to connect it to the ESC. Again see the Sea Scout blog for the details of the conversion. Basically; once the field coil and brush-gear (rotor coil) have been separated a simple diode bridge can be used to apply the output of the ESC to the motor. This enables the reversal of EITHER field OR rotor coil polarity, depending on how you connect the converter to the motor. Thus reversing the direction of rotation of the motor. Beneficial side effect is that the diodes also suppress the commutator sparking😊 In my case, with the Taycol Target, I also cleaned, flattened and polished the commutator. Thus significantly reducing the potential for spark generation in the first place! A peculiarity of the Taycol motors is that they all use metal brushes, pressed phosphor bronze strip, so they need oiling! DO NOT oil conventional brushed motors with carbon brushes unless the brushes are exchangeable or you want to have to buy a new motor!!!!! Pics 5 & 6 show the proposed position of the Taycol in Gina 2 and pic 7 the prototype converter board I knocked up to test the motor, together with a Graupner Navy V30R Marine Brushed ESC. Details and results in the Sea Scout blog, including video of the sparks and oscilloscope pics of the drive waveforms before and after conversion! The latter showing the spark suppression effect of the converter😊 Some samples attached - last 3 pics. Pic 8 pic shows a more compact version of the converter, one of a few types I'm doing for Martin's various Taycols as a trade for the prop shaft he made for me and some useful material he sent. Thanks mate👍 Next steps will be 1) mounting the gears correctly on the shafts, requiring the manufacture of a 3/32" to 4mm adaptor and a 1/8" to 4mm adaptor, and keying them to the shafts - Hooray for mini milling machines 😉 2) manufacturing bushed end plates to hold the gears in place, 3) fitting the motor mounting platform. I'll probably borrow from my experiences of real shipbuilding and do this as a suspended 'false floor', i.e. mounted on stiff springs to enable adjustments to optimise the gearing mesh! On real naval ships this is done to improve shock resistance and to minimise engine noise / vibration conduction to the hull, thus significantly reducing the acoustic signature of the ship. Not that I'm tooo worried about being torpedoed 😁 Worth a try😉 Pic 9 shows the cleaned up and renovated Taycol Target motor. Pic 10 shows the drive waveform complete with sparks before modification.🤔 Pic 11 the cleaned 'forward' waveform with the converter board. Pic 12 the cleaned 'reverse' waveform, no suppression capacitors needed 😉 More soon folks, Cheers, Doug 😎 PS Along the way a new keel was fitted as can be seen in pics 1 to 3. The original builder had 'buried' the keel in the hull planking! 😲

H.M.S. BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 months ago
Decided to retry with the 2S battery and the original scale style propellers. Concluded that the speed is fine, especially in the windy conditions encountered and in a small pool that limited acceleration. The model had a very flat plane, must adjust the transom flap angle to see what effect that has. The forefoot did not rise much from the water surface. Was frustrated by the “stutter” referred to in the last blog, noticed this occurred on the two out shafts only and when the starboard was operated after the port was running. Swopped the starboard motor over with the centre one to see what effect it would have. As started to remove the motor noted that a connector was not tight and that the screw had corroded. Exchanged motors, removed all connectors then cleaned and refitted using a water resistant lubricant. The stutter seemed cured. Another lesson learnt, when dealing with these high currents every connection is tested and all defects exposed. The opportunity to retest using a 3S battery arose so installed it, all worked fine on the bank. Put the model in the water and a major short occurred. 2 fuses blew and about 6” of wiring melted and burnt through the insulation. At least there was no hull damage! Did an inquest and, apart from the damage described, also found the starboard ESC and motor had failed. These were the ones where the “stutter” originated, but cannot see any correlation between the two problems. Discussed the model with some of fellow scale modelers and concluded that the 4500kV motors are unsuitable for the scale propellers used. Every suggestion points toward motors in the 1 – 2000kV range. As now needed to obtain a new motor and ESC, decided to reequip both outer shafts with 2000kv motors and water cooled ESCs. Felt modifying these outer shafts would allow assessment of this new drivetrain combination, could then decide what approach to take with the centre shaft. Due to the mounting and driveshaft arrangement, the choice of motors was restricted to 28mm O/D with a 1/8” shaft size. Unfortunately, suitable items are on back-order from Hong Kong, so there will be no further updates for a while.

What Li-po? by Flack Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
I think that if you are considering changing to LiPo's then it is worth the complete transition and also move to brushless motors and appropriate speed controllers. However if you don't wish to go to the expense involved in such a move an appropriate battery size in Lipo would be 7.4v, the higher the capacity in mah will only increase the an mount of time it will last. I think the performance will prove to be exciting.

H.M.S. BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
From the brief pool test, had decided that the motors could be susceptible to overheating, so connected up the water jacket cooling system and powered it with a small pump. Did not leave enough space to fit a scoop behind a propeller anyway, but prefer the positive action of a pump though. From feeling the ESCs, was also concerned they could overheat within a confined space such as the hull. Mounted a couple of small fans in a bridge structure above the ESCs, along with the ESC switches. Not sure either of these cooling modifications are really required, but erred on the side of caution. Final weight of the hull, with all electrics (apart from battery) comes to 5.05 lbs. Looks like will not achieve the target weight of 6 lbs, but am hopeful will be able to get close to it.. Built the deck up with gun mount bases and a removable decking over the engine area. This limits access to the internals; so will not fit it permanently until the test program is complete and all modifications incorporated. Have now reached a point where any further work will be to start finishing the model, unless drivetrain modifications are required. Have thus decided to leave it until after the first open water test date. This will be in late May as am away until then.

H.M.S. BRAVE BORDERER by RHBaker Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 months ago
Once the rudder, propeller and shafts were installed, the position of the motors could be established. A light aluminium bracket to hold all three was fabricated and bonded to the hull. Due to the high speed capability of the brushless motors, particular attention was paid to alignment. Also kept to the shortest prop. shafts that could be fitted to avoid whipping. Although the motor type might change, whatever is best will require a sound electrical installation as the current requirements for each brushless motor could reach 50 Amps. Wired each motor and ESC separately with its own dedicated fuse to give the maximum system protection. There is an extra fuse section allocated for auxiliary circuits, such as a cooling water pump and lights. Will try the original planned layout of 3 x 2835 motors with 30mm propellers and a 2S Li-Po battery first. Am hoping the reduced voltage will also make these motors more tractable. For the test program the three ESCs will be each controlled from an individual Rx channel. Once the final layout is determined, a more sophisticated and flexible control system can be installed. To minimize ballast, particularly around the stern, the battery will be housed as far into the bow as possible. After the test runs the final battery type, size and location can be established. To assess performance, hope to try both 2 and 3S Li-Po batteries. Planning to reduce heat build up by fitting cooling water jackets to the motors, these are easiest to instal at this stage so the wiring or mounts are not disturbed in the future. Have not decided the layout for the water circuit yet, but this easily can be added later. All that is needed now is the ice to melt off our local lakes so tests can commence.

Power Cabling by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 months ago
Hi Neil, How many fuses do you need??? Remember, wherever you put them you need easy access to be able to change a dud fuse without taking the million screws out and removing the whole deck.🤔 I'm considering using the space next to the repositioned battery, just behind the port propshaft hull exit. Another consideration is on your mounting plate forward, but NOT at the edges as you show in your photo cos you'll never get at them when the deck is on 😉 I'm thinking of a 'bridge' across the middle (above where you have the receiver in your photo) so that the fuses protrude above the main deck. Then you can get at 'em easy 😉 I will also save space by using a UBEC to tap off the drive batt for the RX supply instead of a separate RX battery. Pics tomorrow - I hope! Cheers Doug 😎

happy Hunter by spitfiresooty Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 11 months ago
work on renovating my Happy hunter is progressing but I need to decide on the battery and make location for it in the hull so that I can get the right amount of ballast in before proceeding any further .The question is what battery to use .The Hull has 2 motors fitted with gearboxes ,I think the motors are 540,s but there are no markings on them.I am thinking a 12volt SLA battery but would welcome some advice

46" Firefloat What Motor/Battery by canabus Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 months ago
Hi What type of props are you using(size and number of blades). I see your basic problem is under powered motors and a very heavy battery. I made the big switch over three years ago from brush to brushless motors and to Lipo batteries. With the help on the forum and club members it was a learning curve, but, I would not go back. A 5800mah Lipo battery is in the weight of 450 to 570 grams and would give you a good 1/2 hour run time. A good balance charger and safety bag are the main requirements, also maximum charging for the 5800mah battery is 5.8 Amps(same as the old Nicads). Also a low voltage battery alarm. Your 600 motors can draw up to12Amps !!! Replacement same size motors for your mounts would be 35mm brushless motors, but, you will require two ESCs with a Y connector to run on the same throttle channel. Replacement brushless motors are far more powerful e.g. a Hobbyking 3639-1100kv with a 60Amp ESC on a 4S 5800mah Lipo Battery is 800watts and with two in your boat is 1600 watts!!! Your old motor would in the 100 watt each mark !! I have the same size crash tender, but, with a single brushless motor. I have all the order numbers for the motors etc. and a setup the ESCs if your require. Canabus

Battery Power and Servo Mounting 6 by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 months ago
Only a short one, as I have realised that dealing with Battery Mounting means I need to deal with changing the Rudder Servo first! (Pic 1) So to remove the servo was easy as was replacing with the better unit. It is by the way much easier to remove the Servo Bracket and then the Servo than leaving it in. Same naturally applies when fitting (Pic 2/3) I had to remember to have the lead coming out on the correct side though! (Pic 4) I had been thinking about whether I should be using proper metal linkages to the rudder mechanism and issues about ‘slop’, but now it looks like there will not be a choice, but let us leave that until later as this is going to be a short session. (Pic 5) In fitting the battery I was conscious that it has to pass in and out of that rear hatch, stay on the centre line and avoid fouling the Rudder Servo...................... So I cut a base plate of Balsa to stick in the bottom of the Hull so making it reasonably flat for the Battery and a Balsa Plank to stop the Battery accidentally moving towards the gear boxes. Before gluing them in place I attached Velcro/ hook and eye patches to hold the Battery in place. (Pic 6 ) There appears to be at least two thicknesses of this stuff, very rigid and strong and the other softer, more flexible and slightly less ‘grab power’ (Pic 7 ). I opted for the lighter stuff as it could be a struggle getting in and out of the Hatch! (Pic 8) I may need to put a loop of something around the battery to assist in removal, but that is for later. I just glued the Balsa in with ‘Gorilla’ glue and laid the battery in to add weight whilst drying (Pic 9/10/11) Next time I hope to concentrate on getting the forward platform loaded and the power linked up. NPJ

Electronics Down Below (5) by NPJ Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 11 months ago
This time I will try to remember to put in the ‘source’ information on the bits and pieces I use........... In the most recent piece I should have included exciters/transducers are Dayton Audio DAEX 25VT -4, 4 Ohms – 20 Watt pair, obtained from Sound Imports Netherlands and very quickly as well. The sound unit is a Mtroniks Digisound 5M diesel sound, available all over the place. Now to look at where I am at. Exciters are in place as high up the Hull as possible, but remembering the Deck level. Used the adhesive pads as supplied after wiping that part of the Hull with Meths and Silicone adhesive to keep in place as well as using the wiring tidies from Modelsport Ltd., for the cabling. (Pic 1+2) Before I start the motor and controller wiring I changed the platform ‘up front’ (pic3) with a piece of thin ply which I have given a couple of coats of varnish to waterproof. Then I thought to myself “why am I waterproofing this when, if it gets that wet, it will have gone to the bottom and be useless anyway”! (Pics 4) However, the platform gives a little more choice in terms of layout of other components and my plan for them is not really settled yet. I am concerned about the stern and possible swamping, but it currently seems the best place for the upgraded battery. (Pic5 ) Whilst talking batteries, I have gone for a separate battery supply for the receiver and hope to use the Bec supply for running other less critical items. Also the fitting of the battery in the stern bay drew my attention to the rudder servo for a couple of reasons. First is I am still considering increasing the size of the rudders and I am assuming that will increase the strain on the servo. The servo supplied is a standard issue and not water resistant so I have gone for an upgrade as shown(Pic6) That gives torque increase of 17Kg/cm over the Hobby Engine S1040C and has metal gears, metal control arm and waterproof for 20grams extra weight. Second is the closeness to the new battery position. So I was going to alter the servo arm setup anyway and the new metal arm suits this well. Maybe my ‘tutors’ will consider all this to be a little ‘over the top’ but I do so enjoy messing......................... New Servo DS 3218 by AYANI from Amazon. (Pics 6/7 ) Following that distraction, back to the front end and the Motor/Mixer placing and wiring. Now a little time ago I drew a plan to see what could go where and it came out that most of the ‘bits’ would go in the front bay with motors to be wired once power was brought forward, followed by the Esc/Mixer. (Pic 8) At that time I bought a P94 dual esc/mixer from Action Electronics and got the 20 amp version to be on the safe side................. My ‘guardians’ did point out this was ‘over-kill’ but I had already got it. Now, when placing the unit on the mounting board I found that the heatsinks made it too high to fit in the Hull! So being a spoilt brat only child I ordered the 10 amp version and as usual it came very quickly from up here in Bangor. ( Will keep the other one for the next project............Happy Hunter??) Unboxed it and it looked just the same, heatsinks and all. (Pic 9/10 ) So at that moment there was a bit of a set-back so I rang Component Shop at Bangor, they said “take the heat sinks off and you have a P94 lite”! Such a simple answer and such a nice chap. (Pic 11 ) Now a quick 'measure up' before I have a glass of wine (Pic 12) and does it all fit...? Well it appears to at the moment! (Pic 13) Next time really going to screw down the components under the forward hatch and wire it up. NPJ

Motor problem by RichardSReade Lieutenant   Posted: 12 months ago
Reilly, I stand corrected I see what you are saying, the speed of the boat is just about right, if I fit a smaller prop then I will need a much faster motor to keep it at that speed then I presume the battery will not last as long, in fact that is something I would like to work out, although I am ok with wiring and working out loads at mains voltage etc. my ohms law is useless with DC voltage and mAh Haverlock I had a look at that motor but I see the recommended motor mount would block of the front air holes again (same mout as I have) Canabus thanks for that sounds expensive besides which I have spent out nearly, my pension does not really extend to this hobby, but enjoyment is important. I wonder if the last three words of the previous paragraph is a quote from some famous person I could add to the bottom of my posts😁

Motor problem by RichardSReade Lieutenant   Posted: 12 months ago
Hi reilly4 I do not think it is as large as 60mm as it is a three bladed prop, if it was a two bladed one I would agree with you as the blades would be directly opposite each other hence 60mm, but being 3 bladed they are not 90 degrees to the centre point, without taking it off and drawing a circle around it to measure I would hazard a guess it is a 30mm prop. If memory serves me correctly the late Swindon Model Shop which was run by Yan who knew his stuff recommended the 540 motor along with the prop for the size of the boat. I will check the Sea Commander plans as I think it has the size of the required prop listed. Haverlock the motor is rated 4.5 to 15 volts and the battery is 7.2 volt, I would have to run the boat in water to see what the motor is drawing under load, I may get a tad wet trying to keep up with it to read an amp meter, or sink the boat by sitting on it😉 I think the overheat problem was to do with the motor mounting braket covering the front air slots on the motor. However I have a water scoop which I did not fit at the time of building so may retro fit and buy a new motor set up for water cooling, the next question would be where abouts do I fit it?