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>> Home > Tags > boat yard

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Riva boat launch by Alan999 Lieutenant   Posted: 6 days ago
Riva was finally launched in the Torrevieja boat clubs water last Sunday after eleven months work. Fifteen coats of yacht varnish and final Polish of Turtle wax she went like a dream.Plans came from America and the plywood from local woodyard.Graupner 37 motor pushed 31 inches smoothly. Dumas supplied the chrome fittings

ILLINI LOYAL by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 35"/2700g ILLINI LOYAL Capable of 12mph and a runtime of 60mins Twin Propellors (5 Blade 50mm) Direct Drive to a 775 JOHNSON TYPE (5 Blade) Powered by NiMH (8.4v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through DIMART 320A FAN-COOLED (15Amps) ESC - Comments: ANOTHER ON THE WAYS: SALVAGED DUMAS ABS HYDRODYNE HULL, 35 X 10 X 2" ORIGINALLY IN THE AMERICAN BEAUTY KIT. MY INTENT IS TO SCRATCH BUILD FROM THIS HULL, A SINGLE-DECK TWIN SCREW LINEHAUL TOWBOAT WITH A FUNCTIONING TELESCOPING PILOTHOUSE. THEY ARE COMMON ON THE UPPER ILLINOIS RIVER WHERE THERE ARE FIXED OVERPASSES OR LOW OBSTRUCTIONS SPANNING THE WATERWAY. THE DES PLAINES AND CALUMET RIVERS IN THE CHICAGO AREA ALSO HARBOR THESE PUSHBOATS. THE PLAN IS TO KEEP HER LIGHT WITH A LOW CG, BUT POWERFUL ENOUGH TO PUSH SOME SCALE WEIGHT; I RECKON 775 MOTORS WITH 50MM 5-BLADE WHEELS WILL SUFFICE. THIS BOAT WILL BE STEERED WITH STANDARD RUDDERS, NO FLANKING RUDDERS, BECAUSE I WANT TO KEEP IT SIMPLE. (K.I.S.S.) I AM STILL BRAINSTORMING THE SYSTEM FOR RAISING/LOWERING THE PILOTHOUSE; POSSIBLY A SERVO WINCH & CABLE OR LINEAR SERVO. A PNEUMATIC RIG IS ALSO A POSSIBILITY I RECKON. SHE WILL BE WEARING THE ORANGE TRIM AND MIDNIGHT BLUE PAINT SCHEME OF MY SHOP-ILLINIWEK MARINE SCALE SHIPYARD. I USE LIGHTHOUSE LED's & MINI SWITCHES FROM THE SEATTLE AREA EXCLUSIVELY, 9V, 3MM. HARBOR MODELS 1.5V WORKING RADAR & MAYBE A 6V WORKING DECK CAPSTAN WILL BE ADDED. SHE IS MY 5TH ADDITION TO THE ILLINIWEK MARINE FLEET, AND WILL OF COURSE PUSH AHEAD THE MATCHING BARGES. GO FIGHTING ILLINI!

USCG CG-44345 by circle43nautical Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 28"/1400g USCG CG-44345 Capable of 14mph and a runtime of 45mins Twin Propellors (3 Blade 40mm) Direct Drive to a MAB 540 (3 Blade) Powered by NiMH (8.4v) 3Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through HOBBYWING (10Amps) ESC - Comments: VINTAGE BILLING BOATS (MY FIRST RC ENDEAVOR 1989) 1:20 US COAST GUARD 44' MOTOR LIFEBOAT. ABS HULL & DECK WITH PLYWOOD CABINS. ALL STOCK RUNNING HARDWARE AND FITTINGS. I'M CURRENTLY OVERHAULING HER, HULL IS DECORATED AND MARKED WITH NEW DECALS. THE ORIG KIT WAS CG-44329, WHICH SAILED OUT OF US COAST GUARD LIFEBOAT STATION MANASQUAN INLET, NJ. I CHANGED THE HULL NUMBER AND RELOCATED HER TO USCG LIFEBOAT STATION LUDINGTON, MI., WHICH WAS MY DREAM STATION WHEN I WAS A PROUD US COAST GUARDSMAN, '80-86. THERE WERE 110 OF THESE MLB'S BUILT BY THE COAST GUARD YARD IN CURTIS BAY, MD, AND THE DESIGN WAS SO SUCCESSFUL, IT WAS DUPLICATED BY THE RNLI AND STILL IN SERVICE TODAY. THERE ARE EVEN A COUPLE FOR SALE THE LAST TIME I CHECKED. OTHER THAN THE 40' UTB, THE 44 IS MY FAVORITE COASTAL RESCUE CRAFT. YES-MR. ARNOLD PALMER WAS A US COAST GUARDSMAN (YM3) 1950-53

Chesapeak Bay Maritime Museum by pugwash1 Seaman   Posted: 5 months ago
This is way more than just a maritime museum. The location in the heart the Chesapeak Bay Area, the home of the only sail ” fishing fleet in the U.S.A. No power drives at all with the exception of small ”pusher” units, kind of tiny, with room for a motor only! These are used to aid in getting to the fishery. The traditional boat is a Skipjack and the museum is a living boat yard. So even when there is no events there is always something to see. Model boat days are held around a large square tempary pool. One day is for scale and live steam, and another is free sail and model skipjack racing. We do not have control of the weather but I can not remember anything but sun on the days I have been there👍. The team at the museum are a great group of ladies and gentlemen who are passionate in their love of the sea and on model days you will find loads of helpful tips etc from all the “captains”. If you are visitors on holiday, Anapolis is no more than three quarters of an hour away, this is the home of the Rodgers collection of dockyard models and the worlds largest collection of French prisoner of war bone models (napolionic) in the world, it is a super nautical town! the Chesapeake museum is in St.Michaels, with lots of super shopping for the non model boating spouses. Further up the road on Tilghman island is a fantastic nautical book store who specializes in model ships and boats. However you need to visit the book store a day before the show day as everyone will be looking for that rare and special book!!!!! Hope this is a help.

Unbekannte Flitze. A very flighty girl by AllenA Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Managed, at last, to get to the water on Monday at the Knap in Barry, South Wales with the Vale of Glamorgan Model Boat Club. Unbekannte Flitze was very fast off the mark, agile with incredible turns and generally good control. After about 5 or 6 minutes she became sluggish and I started to bring her in. About a yard out she just pointed her nose in the air and bubbled ignominiouly as she went to the bottom. Only one answer. off with everything but my pants and in we go. Rumour from Ken Thompson was that i was practising for the local Iron Man event. One poor lady actually believed it. The problem was a loose water cooling pipe....my fault for p... poor preparation. Note to self... buy chest waders.

Tilgear by marky Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Just to agree with Doug the Bluebell is gorgeous👍👍 , the shipyard I served my time in Henry Robb built quite a few of the Flower class I remember there being a painting of HMS Dianthus (sunk by a U boat if memory serves ) and photographs of Pink and a few more in one of the management offices ,always wondered where all the models went when the yard closed .

HMS Ceres by Gdaynorm Commander   Posted: 6 months ago
[Score: 8/10] 57" HMS Ceres Capable of 3mph and a runtime of 60mins Twin Propellors (3 Blade 30mm) Direct Drive Powered by NiCad (7.2v) Batteries - Comments: Scratch built using Admiralty drawings from Greenwich and miscellaneous photos. Hull carved from basswood as are boats. Rigging and aerials steel guitar strings. Flage halyards thread. Sails very well and remarkably stable for such a narrow ship due to bilge keels. Hours logged on contruction 885, which includes research on line.

new brighton model boat lake by rolfman2000 Admiral   Posted: 6 months ago
Most of my models are the old Aerokits models, or modern versions of, so none fall into those categories. I sail what I like to think of as "normal boat models". Most are capable of more than 4mph, but do get a move on when asked to 😉 And finally, yes, as a member of Worcester Model Boat Club, i do have PLI, and would wear my club lanyard so to prove. Thanks for your replies Dave M. Best wishes, Dave W 😊

What Gun? by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Hi Cormorant, 'Italian job' 76mm would mean Oto Melara. And this is like no OM gun I ever saw on board in 30 years working with navies and shipyards around the world. Looks more east block to me. Probably Russian or Chinese. What is the origin of the photo? Looks like it could be on a DDR (East German) Patrol Boat probably of Russian design, maybe built by Peenewerft yard in Wolgast. Cheers Doug 😎

Secure the hatches and raise the flags ! by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Having spent so much time adding fittings and detail to the removable cabin roofs and hatches the last thing I want is for them to be dislodged and see them sink without trace 😱! Having used some amazingly strong neodymium magnets to hold the foam tanks securely in the rear well I was confident that they would be more than powerful enough to hold the various roofs and hatches in place so I scoured eBay for some suitable sizes and shapes. I settled on two sizes, 25x6x3mm and 12x6x3mm and ordered 10 of each, more than I need but so useful to have in the bits box. A word of caution with these magnets, always slide them apart and avoid letting them crash together as the impact can easily break them into pieces, as I discovered. Thankfully I have some spares ! For the engine roof magnets I made a couple of small plywood brackets into which the larger magnets are fixed with epoxy and these were in turn epoxied onto the inside faces of the engine room walls. The mating magnets were let into the underside of the roof frame and firmly glued in place after double checking the mating polarity and orientation. An identical method was used for the forward cabin roof but using the smaller magnets. For the removable panel in the centre section over the motor I used a single pair of small magnets on the rear edge only as the front of this panel is held under the cabin door in a rebated part of the floor that forms the threshold of the door. I had to fit a small brass handle in the rear of this panel so that I could pull the panel up and away as there is no other means of doing so without, I made a ‘hook tool’ from some brass wire for this purpose. The floor panel in the rear cockpit is secured on it’s rear edge by a pair of the larger magnets, the forward edge being held down by the towing hook bracing stays. The removable hatch in the rear cockpit floor was also fitted with two pairs of the smaller magnets let into the underside of the hatch and the hatch framing of the floor. One of the brass handles that I that had previously set into the hatch was bent up slightly so that I could use my brass ‘hook tool’ to release it from the magnets hold. So now all the roofs and hatches are firmly secured by the concealed magnets and are easily removable without any fiddly catches or fixings and now there’s now very little chance of them coming adrift and disappearing! The final finishing detail are the two RAF ensigns, one on the mast and one on the stern flagstaff. The ensigns were made by Mike Allsop Scale Flags & Ensigns who was very helpful and advised me on the most suitable sizes for the 1:12 scale of my boat. His flags are extremely well made, excellent value for money and look very realistic when flying and fluttering !! Mike can be contacted at: scaleflags@outlook.com or by telephone on 01476 573331 They are hand made from a fine and flexible silk cloth that behaves like a real flag even in a slight breeze and are easy to fix with diluted PVA glue. The smaller flag was fitted to the lanyard on the mast as described in the supplied instruction sheet. The ensign on the stern flagstaff was very carefully formed and glued so that the flag was not fixed in one place and could rotate around the shaft of the flagstaff as this piece screws into a brass fitting on the rear deck and this will ensure that it will always find it’s own position. A small brass ring was formed and glued to the flagstaff below the ensign so it would always stay at the top and not slip down. So, all hatches battened down, flags raised and ready for action. That’s just about everything finished now barring any trimming and ballasting required and is ready for it’s maiden voyage. I hope that all of you that have been following my blog have had as much enjoyment reading about my build as I have had in the building and finishing process 😁 And a big thank you to all that have contributed so much with encouraging comments, suggestions and advice 👏 😍

Dont throw your tins out. by BOATSHED Admiral   Posted: 8 months ago
I have been into model boating since I was 9 (1959) ans still enjoy it. I moved up to Heywood in 1991 and lived there for 2 years and as I had nowhere to do things there and take model boats to use them, I left them down in my Greenwich flat. used to see people fishing in Queens Park so I thought I cannot use a model boat on there. So I went there fishing instead and also went out to Pilsbury and fished there. I was living in a house in Wild Street Heywood with my Ex wife. (yes EX). We were just getting back together. I only wish I had known there was a model boat club that I could have gone to. I had seen there was a pond/lake in the grounds of Mutual Mill as this was just at the end of Wild Street. I once asked a man at the gates of Mutual is I was allowed to fish in there and he said no it's private. I have since seen in the angling papers where they have had fishing days there. And also since joining this site I have seen it is also used for model boating. OH what a bummer, that was 2 years of using my model boats wasted 😭. We eventually moved down to Greenwich and she now rents the Heywood house out. And I go using my model boats down here now and also use them in the boatyard in Potter Heigham when we go up to Norfolk to my river boat up there.😊

As of Summer 2017... by Jerry Todd Commander   Posted: 8 months ago
After the sail, I added some hardware to the spars, namely jackstays. I also ordered some aircraft plywood and used it to make new winch drums. These are sized to my current plan of only bracing the tops'l yards. Hopefully, this is the last set I'll have to make. Seeing into the dark interior of the hull can be a pain, more so the brighter it is outside. Mark got some red LEDs to light up the dash of his old pick-up (ute for my Assie friends) and gave me a left-over section. It requires a 12 volt supply (I'm running 6) and red doesn't really help in daylight, but I like the idea. If I can find a white LED strip that'll run on 6 volts, this will definitely get put in. The stern also had folding bulwarks like the bow, but that wrapped all the way around. On the real ship these were replace with a fixed bulwark except for a couple of panels that allowed access to the stern boat. By the time the ship came to Baltimore in 1955, these too were gone, with all their hardware. Again, I'm not making them functional, and decided to built these on the model rather than as separate pieces like on the bow. The hinges are represented inboard by card stock and brass eyes. The barrel portion of the hinges outboard at the bottom of each panel will be a little section of 1/16" wood dowel. The forward bulwarks were epoxied in place and the support rods were installed all around. The tops are raw because they all get a bright cap rail (varnished natural wood) and I'll put that on when it won't get messed up with paint or glue. A friend sent me a box of stuff, among which was a nive little cat face perfect for my catheads. Only having one, I was going to cast a pair in resin. But I'm out of casting resin and epoxy glue didn't set up in a way I liked, so we'll come back to that. The tops'l yards on the ship are hinged iron bands, line with wood staves. I wanted to replicate that functionality not only because that's what the ship has, but because it would allow me to take them off the mast without unrigging half the ship. I cut some heavy copper I use for everything and bent it into two half circles; soldiered brass tubing to the ends, and sawed out the notches with a jewelers saw. If only it had been that easy. Soldiering here tended to un-soldier there, cold soldier joints wouldn't hold. I gave up in frustration. I changed the gun carriages based on some research I did, but I'll post separate entries dealing with them and the ship's boats. I went looking for information on soldiering little things, and took another whack at the parrels. This time it worked out much better. I reused the copper band and brass tubing for the main and made the fore the same way. I still have to make the mizzen tops'l yard parrel, but my soldiering has gotten much much better. Last May ('17) I took the boat to the Baltimore Port Expo for National Maritime Day again, surrounded by members of our newly formed White Rocks Model Boat Club. I didn't manage to get her controls set-up in time, so she didn't go in the pool, but sat on her cart and looked pretty. I put her courses and trys'ls on her for this. The trys'ls won't be used when she sails, but can be set for static displays. The courses will get used, but I'll be able to buntl them up as shown to reduce sail. Also to reduce sail, the t'gallants and royals will be easily removable, or replaceable, as the case may be, depending on what wind there is. That pretty much brings us up to date as of July 2017. I'll post something about the boats and guns in a bit, as well as any other progress that's made. There's far more detail, images, and notes at my website on this, and the other models I'm working on at: http://todd.mainecav.org/model/ There's a few items I skimmed, or skipped over, like her signal flags, that are covered in detail there; like the day she was almost dismasted by the garage door.

fire boat by marky Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
my granddaughter has decided if her brother can build a boat and get glue in his hair and paint everywhere else then so can she (a little bit of big eyes and petted lip)so E-mailed my tame CAD lazer wizard to get another one cut he's going to cut one in ply and the other 2 in 3mm mdf for the kids ,the back bedroom's going to look like a shipyard with 3 on the slips

JOLIE BRISE gaff-rigged cutter by Dom of Essential RC Captain   Posted: 9 months ago
This fantastic model was scratch built by John of the Solent Radio Controlled Model Boat Club. Here it is seen sailing in light winds on Setley Pond in the New Forest, UK. She took about a year to construct and is now into the third year of sailing. The boat is based on the period 1929/34 when "Bobby" Somerset owned her, he won the Fastnet race twice and finished second once, infact she is the only boat to win the Fastnet three times. She is based on the river Hamble and is owned by Dauntseys school in Wiltshire and is regularly raced by the pupils there. The model is approximately 1:15 scale. In 2013 the full size Jolie Brise celebrated the centenary anniversary of her construction by the Paumelle yard in Le Havre in 1913. The world famous, gaff-rigged pilot cutter was the last boat to carry the royal mail under sail and has won the Fastnet Race three times, including the inaugural race in 1925. In 2015 and 2016 she was the overall winner of the Tall Ships Races. Jolie Brise is owned, maintained and sailed by the pupils of Dauntsey's School. For more information about Jolie Brise go to, www.joliebrise.com (apologies...just seen this vid was already posted by Dave M😁)

RAF rttl D2763 by teejay Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 9 months ago
A brief history After the second world war and as part of the occupational forces the Second tactical air force the RAF took over Sylt airport in 1945 and later in 1946 the RAF decided to use the airport and the airspace west of Sylt and Amrum as a firing range, and was known as RAF Sylt Armament Practice Station. From February 1948 to February 1949 the airfield was closed and prepared for the operation of jet aircraft. For target practice a target towing Squadron was stationed continuously on the station. The aircraft used were Miles M. 25 Martinet, hawker Tempest TT, DE Havilland mosquito TT. 35, Gloster Meteor F. 8, Meteor T 7. For instruction and training flights the flight also had some DE Havilland vampire T. 9s, hawker Hunter F. 4s, Hunter T. 7s. The aircraft of the target towing squadron were housed in the hangar of 402 near the South West of the Station. Therefore, the unofficial designation of weapon training squadron 402 was used at the time. For patrolling and securing the range area, as well as for rescue and training operations Marine Craft Section boats were stationed at List and Hörnum, Bristol Sycamore HR 14 rescue helicopters were Also station at RAF Sylt. Air traffic control boats and HSLs were stationed in the port of List at the beginning of the fifties (see pictures) D Boats In 1954, the decision was taken to replace the air traffic control boats and the HSLs with RttLs mk2s Rescue Target Towing Launch. As part of the rebuilding program to help the German economy the boats were designed and built by Krogerwerft Yard at Rendsburg. (Later taken over by Lursson ship builders) and were numbered D2762- D2766 these boats came in service mid 1955 which explains why my Father severed on both HSL and D-boats (preferring the D-boat) D2762 and D2765 Based Hörnum, D2763 and D2764 from List, with D2766 as a reserve boat in the event of maintenance or breakdown, Their design was very different to any other boats in the Marine Craft Section/unit more like the German Schenllboot or S Boot (allied code name 'E' Boat which my father always used), with flared bows and rounded bilges and powered by high speed diesels. The D boats were fitted with winches for Target Towing, these were removed as the boats duties were change to Range Safety and ASR These boats only served with the RAF, until 1961. Two were sold to the south African Air force D2762 and D2764 in1961, and the other three handed over to the Federal German Navy in 1961. All were subsequently used as ASR craft. D- Boats in German service The German Navy, the “Bundesmarine commissioned them on 1.9.1961 as FL 9 to FL11 and were used by Marinefliegergeschwader 5"naval aviation Squadron 5” Until end of September 1975. the three were termed as air traffic control The fate of these three boats is a bit uncertain, one of these boats was in the process of being sold as NVG S1 as a North Sea supply boat, this deal fell through and the boat was sold to private owner in Italy (no further record for this boat found) the other two boats are said to been scraped or de-commissioned , however these boats are quit properly the two that ended up in the service of the Spanish customs service as cutters, after they were confiscated when smuggling, I have tried to contact the Spanish about these boats but have not heard from them and presume they were scraped or sold in to private hands ( there is the suggestion that they were driven on rocks and sunk, no evidence found) D-boats of the South African air force/navy The two boats that were obtained by the south African air force in 1961 were originally known as R30 and R31 and they served under SAAF until 1969 when the unit was taken over by the south African navy and R30 became P1552 and R31 became P1551 these were changed again when holiday makers referred to the boats as PISS1 and PISS1 too R30 to P30 and R31 to P31. Both these boats were diffidently sunk R30 Lost off Saldanah Bay on 7 October 1988 after striking a reef off Danger Point. R31, near Cape Point, after she grounded through contaminated fuel issues There are somethings about these boats that strike me as odd, The originations that took over these boats, they don’t like to mention the fact that these were ex-RAF or British boats, There is no record of the Spanish boats, it is said that they were sunk but no details are available except what is said on one form. I think I have done as much looking for information as I can, most of the bare facts are stated so thanks to all those web sites and forms that I have used and the pictures I have used I would like to thank to Dave M for the drawing And thanks to the marine craft branch museum for their help and for putting me in touch with Mr Rick Mortby who built the museums model of the D boat And a big thank you to Rick Mortby for the scale drawing and for his trust. And to Dr Christian Ostersehlte historian for Lurssen shipbuilders for the pictures of my Fathers boat D2763 and now I can start the building of the model D boat