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>> Home > Tags > glue

glue
glue
The wheelhouse navigation light. by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 days ago
This is a small item but very visible on the wheelhouse and since the standard for this item has been set I have to follow suit. So first of all get some 3mm blue LEDs ordered and then it’s on with preparing the white metal body. I used by hand as suggested a series of drills increasing in diameter until 3.1 dia was reached but only 2/3 down the length from the front the smaller hole (1.5mm) was bored right through for the wires to exit. Arrival of the LEDs, first check the LED using my power supply, just over 3 volts seems to illuminate to the correct level. Next was to remove the shoulder on its plastic casing so the whole body does not exceed 3mm over its length and lightly abrade the outside to give a diffused light. Next cut the LED legs to 2mm from the plastic casing noting which is positive, next prepare the wires. I used Futaba servo wire cable 22awg which is very flexible and with the white signal wire stripped off leaving a red and black wire. These were tinned and cropped to 2mm and then quickly soldered to the appropriate terminal. Next check the LED still works! first hurdle over, I now needed to check the that when the LED goes into the body it doesn’t short out so checking the diameter over the widest part which is over the soldered terminals this was 0.1 below 3mm. I decided that shrink sleeve was too thick so I mixed some epoxy resin and coated all around the terminals, this proved to be satisfactory in both non-conductivity and dimensionally. Now the final test, using some aliphatic wood glue I slid the LED into the body whilst it was illuminated as it was a tight push fit, bingo it’s still lit – leave to set. I used aliphatic glue, as it would be easier to remove should I ever have to change the LED. The body still needs painting white but this will be done with all the other fittings at a later stage.

Cabin roof hatches by BOATSHED Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
Many thanks for your reply on my question. I wasn't sure what it was. I am still wondering does any one still use Cascamite. I have built several boats in years gone by with it. I am building an Aeronaut Classic at the moment and the glue that was recommended was Deluxe materials Speed Bond. In the instructions it doesn't state what glue to use, there is a small tube of glue with the kit but the instructions say about using dope to seal the wood it may melt the glue. Apart from that I'm far from happy with the way it is made. I would have been better off spending an extra £20 and getting a Sea hornet. I have had to go and buy another piece of sixteenth thick marine ply as the bottom skins do not fit the skeleton. I have used the Depron build sheet as well. I have never built a model on one of these in the past. I built a Sea Hornet in the early 70's and it's still in my shed and needs restoring, But she's still well solid. I'm not so sure that this Aeronaut Classic will stand the use and time that the Sea Hornet has. Has anyone else on here built one of these and found the same problem with it?

Cabin roof hatches by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 12 days ago
Adhesives are a combination of Epoxy for the structural joints and aliphatic for non structural joints unless the type of material is an issue eg white metal fittings adhered to wood would be epoxy and canopy glue for transparent components.

Cabin roof hatches by BOATSHED Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 14 days ago
can I ask please, What glue are you using on her ?

Pretend deck planking by cormorant Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 16 days ago
May be too late, but have you thought about real planking? This was my first attempt following advice on various youtube videos and studying pictures of the full sized boat. Planks supplied by Jotika. They have various sizes and woods and worked out to quantity when I gave them the deck measurements. I used cyano to glue to a plastic deck and sealed with a proprietory outdoor satin varnish. I found it very satisfying and was pleased with the end result. Ps. Please excuse the black dots of fly sht. on the deck in the first picture. Steve

34" RAF Crash Tender Windows by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 30 days ago
That's exactly what I thought Martin 👍 'Make your own'! Like my Sea Scout windows, made from 3mm tinted perspex, cut out on the scroll saw and trim filed to fit. I also used Canopy glue, when it's dry you can't see it👍 Also remembered your previous comments re Crash Tender windows and gutters etc. Cheers, Doug 😎

34" RAF Crash Tender Windows by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 30 days ago
Mike, it's very easy to make your own frames from 60 thou. Plastikard. I used a piercing saw and Swiss files, then cut Perspex to fit inside the frames, sealed with Canopy glue. You don't need frames for anything but the wheelhouse windows. The others have a small gutter just above the window, which is easily made from brass wire and glued on once bent to shape. Glaze the windows like the others, with tightly cut Perspex glued in. Cheers, Martin

Electrical by Ianh Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi All Refer to attached for motor comparison. I don't like using Cyano so the hull be built using ZAP 30minute epoxy and a weather proof Alphylitic from Sika. I will more than likely use a polyurethane based glue for the skinning. The hole boat will be epoxy coated inside and out to add strength. By the way the epoxy resin will increase the strength by about 2.5😁😁

Assemble the hull by Ianh Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
The Bulwarks were out in place on the jig and glued with ZAP 30 minute epoxy. I used the cabin sides to align the bulkheads. By the way Clamps you will need a lot of these

Julieth 4 French fishing boat by canabus Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi NPJ I used TITEBOND 3 ULTIMATE WOOD GLUE by Franklin International. Canabus

The Building Board by Ianh Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 1 month ago
I made this from a 54" long piece of Melamine shelving. shallow cut a centre ine down the middle 1/16" wide. The board was then marked into 2" squares using a laundry marker. The design concept was from a fuselage jig I had made by SLEC. The holes required for the brackets are M5 with captive ( T nuts) underneath pulled up into the bottom of the board. The red tape down the centre is masking tape ( the high quality stuff) this was to stop the boat glueing itself to the board. As the the keel has a skeg we needed to raise the keel to ensure parallelism I used an Enginerers Marking out block and two doorstops on this.The angles can slide and you then clamp the Bulwarks on I used thirty minute epoxy for this although I would like a longer working time epoxy. Bulwarks 3 and 4 with the motor base was also epoxied together. This was then located on the keey ( Dryfit along with the other bulkheads. A word of advice here use the cabin sides to ensure alignment. Check with a rule and squares before gluing anything.

Must get the skins on before I pull all of my hair out!! by MouldBuilder Captain   Posted: 1 month ago
This build is proving to be much more difficult than I had expected. 😤 I think I started this project thinking that all of the parts were ready to fit and glue. As I went on, it became clear that this is not the case. Due to this, and as detailed in the earlier post, I have had to break down the glue joints of the hull frame, and reposition after deepening some of the assembly slots. I have re-assembled the bulkheads, stringers etc. and then started to fit the side skins. This has proven to be the most difficult task so far. You need six arms. After several failures, removal of all of the fixing tape and then starting again, they finally started to look reasonable. I watched a time lapse video on you tube and he seems to do it fairly easily. Oh well. 🤔 Now that I was happy with the fit of the sides, it was time to start on the bottom skins. I started by trying to form chamfers along the keel centre joints so that they look reasonable. Then I once again applied tape to hold them in position whilst glueing with my other three hands, I wish. This only took two attempts. I must be getting better. I still have most of my hair also. Next, I tried to mount the motors onto the angled bulkhead. The front location was very loose so I made a couple of thin silver steel rings to improve the fit. They work very well. 😊 Next job was to fit and align the prop shafts. I decided to make these solid joints and avoid the use of universal joints. The first motor went straight on with perfect shaft alignment. The second was not so good. After two hours of fiddling with a packer, I finally achieved perfect alignment. Next job was to give good joint strength and make the hull water tight. Rightly or wrongly I use a lot of glue to give that perfect seal. I used epoxy for all of the skin inner joints and Stabilit for the outer seams and joints. I used the Stabilit around the shafts as well which looks a little messy at the moment, but I will tidy all of this up next. I will paint the inner Stabilit with white paint to hide a little. This weekend I will do a water test to ensure it is water tight.😱 I think after that I will fit all of the electrics, servo and speed controller. Then I will spray the hull and the main deck prior to fixing together. I would be interested to know what others think about when to paint, before or after assembly, especialy regarding the hull. Enough for now.🤐 I will try to speed up the build a bit now as I am expecting the new 46" Crash Tender to arrive soon. Wood!!! Love it.😊

Pretend deck planking by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Steve, something like a 2B pencil is a good density, but keep it sharp. If you like a nice contrast then a fine fibre point marker pen would do it. Bear in mind that most sailing boats had planks that followed the edge of the boat whereas motor boats had straight planks that follow the king plank down the middle. On a sail boat the curved planks joggle into the king plank in a variety of patterns, all tedious to draw! I lived on a Victorian racing yacht for a few years and its deck planks were, oddly, straight, so it ain't a golden rule. They leaked so bad I had a Gamalan orchestra of pots and pans catching the drips until the deck "took up" and stopped leaking, then the sunshine would shrink em all again for the next rain shower. I would draw the planks on before you glue that ply deck down. So much easier. Cheers, Martin

Carry case. by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hi Gregg, something of that ilk was planned for the reasons you give. The thing is a tight fit because that's how the wood worked out, but it just goes in with space for foam protection. I had a clear out in the workroom yesterday in the gloomy weather and I found the Yeomans fittings kit I so recently cleaned up. I thought I'd misplaced them and clean forgotten where, but they were, in fact, in one of many drawers saying Boat bits. So another weekend sometime soon will be glue the bits on time. Cheers, Martin

Carry case. by Gregg Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Hope you don't mind a suggestion. Make the stand as a separate item, so you can slide the stand and boat out as one. Just glue some guides for the stand to the base so it cant move about, otherwise it means you will have to lift the boat up a fair way to overcome the height of the stand sides, risking damage to the masts and aerials. ;) Or make the roof panel of the box, slide same as the side panel, but you have to slide the side panel out first, so they interlock.