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>> Home > Tags > glue

glue
glue
wheelhouse amd bridge by deepdiver Commander   Posted: 14 hours ago
Hi Alan Good to see you back, I like your use of plastic card covered in wood to build the wheelhouse, it must've made it more easy to glue the corners than to try making it all out of wood. can I P/M you later as I could do with some help with regard to fitting the motors. Fred

Tamar deck colour by alan50 Petty Officer   Posted: 24 hours ago
Hi In the process of building a modelslipway 1/16 Tamar and wanting to know what rattle can shade of grey to use on the deck. Also should l paint the deck the finish colour then glue fittings on afterwards, or glue first and spray everything in situe. My first model boat so any info would be helpful. Alan

Wherry hull in GRP by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
Haha, gotta get the lady wife going at her machine yet, Chris. She has her own bit of the workshop, just in case.She has a modern-ish machine and an ancient German foot operated one in an oak veneered case to choose from. But Cambric is looking the most favourable fabric. Wherries and Waterways I have, but Wendish Lands has evaded me. kmb, the Wherry's format is very similar to the American cat boat. They, too, work very well. Hydrodynamically, I have no idea why they work or why they shouldn't, but clearly they do and very well. I free sailed my old one and it went very well until a gust blew it over and I realised the deck had been glued with flour paste! Everything sprang and it started to slowly sink. I paid some kid 50p to wade out and get it. His mother wasn't too pleased as he didn't take his new shoes off! Happy days in Southchurch Park, eh? I will remember to use a fin keel for it! Martin

wheelhouse amd bridge by AlanP Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
I don't have any photo's of the building of this, so I will try to explain. I cut all the pieces for the wheelhouse out of 1mm plasticard, the pieces were then fitted together with masking tape to make sure that they all fitted neatly together. The windows were then cut out of Perspex and their positions marked and put aside. The floor of the wheelhouse was planked along with the rear wall, the five side pieces were then wooded (for want of a better word) light oak for the frames with teak for the infills, the windows were checked to make sure they still fitted. The whole lot was fitted together with masking tape and glue run down the seams with a small brush. After drying the outside of the wheelhouse was wooded 😁 over lapping the windows by a couple of thou, the windows were glued in place with canopy glue. Aft of the wheelhouse are the battery boxes, these were made out of plasticard with doors made out of wood, kiss buttons used for the door knobs. Two sliding doors were made out of wood, small plastic channel for the runners. The bridge was made using the same principal as the boat deck.

NAXOS - Fishing Boat by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
Depending on what voltage you intend using governs what gearing you should use commensurate with size and weight of model and prop size , IE small boat and prop ,low voltage direct drive would do. As you go bigger then consider gearing.Bear in mind the torque produced by the drill. You could build a large boat with a fine turn of speed using that motor. The thing is there are so many possible variables you could experiment till the cows come home. The thing is how big a boat can you handle without putting your back out. LOL. If you remove the existing gear and replace it with one secured by grub screws and a "GearBox" with easily changed cogs you can achieve something suitable. You shouldn't need cooling .Remember the drill had none and your motor will have free space round it in the hull. If you decide you do want cooling annealed copper tubing can be wound round the can and one of the plastic tubes used to couple this to the scoop and the outlet. One way of making a scoop is a length of tubing with a slot cut in it and a cap soldered (or glued depending on material) on the end when in place under the hull the cutout will face forward. Preferably in the prop wash.Or buy a ready made scoop from a model shop. Much simpler as the mounting method will be incorporated in it already. Here is a page of suitable shops.--https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=model+boat+shops&npsic=0&r... Good luck. P.S. Join a club. Youll get loads of help from the other members.👍👍

Forward H Bitt & Aft H Bitt! by figtree7nts Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
I assembled the forward & aft H Bitts also painted them! They are a bit flimsy. But once glued to the deck. They become stronger! The deck is black from over spray. I will be painting the deck tan or a good shade of wood! The deck has tape all over it! So, I won't have to prime the deck!

It's a sad day!. by stormin Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 7 days ago
Hi Les, funny we've come full circle, I started my model sailing at newsham park back in the late 50s and was there at the beginning of "The Liverpool model POWER boat club back in 1964, when I was 14 years old. Notice the power was omitted from the clubs name approx' 15 years ago. In 1964 i had just completed my first aerokits sea scout complet with an ED seagull 1cc diesel, this club was where I met most of my mentors and founder members of the club, Jimmy Wilson, Cliff'Broadbent, Monty, Oscar Poulson etc etc all now sadly gone to that big lake in the sky where anything goes. I'm in southport now and do go back to newsham from time to time. Thank you for that bit of very interesting info'. The afore mentioned sea scout has just undergone a major re-fit after 55 years, the 1cc diesel has been replaced with a 3940 kv brushless and 60 esc running on 11.1 lipo, yes I know all to big for a little 24inch sea scout, but as the yanks would say " there ain't no substitute for C.C. Boy", you don't have to use it but nice to have. Martin you mentioned the old glue used in those days, the sea scout I made was glued using "caskomite" (can't remember the correct spelling) the boat is still 100% waterproof with no skin separation at all, I do not intend tarting the boat up at all, prefer to keep it the way a 14 year old boy (me) had made it apart from bringing the running gear up to 21st century and something that can be used at my local lakes. Norman.

It's a sad day!. by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
Yep, built mine with my Dad, a 34" Crash Tender. We used the then new PVA glue and to be honest, 54 years later it still holds well and is waterproof. I really must finish it some day! I confess I never had an IC engine in a boat, but I've always had an ED Racer with water jacket and big brass flywheel. Still have it on my shelf with others, but I could never get the buggers to start! So Dad made sure the Crash Tender had a good electric motor when he spoiled me with it all for my 11th Christmas. I had REP single channel R/C and a Taycol Supermarine motor and Taycol coupling. That's what's in it and will stay in it. Alas the R/C gear was stolen. I could replicate the case, but there just ain't the time for all these things, so an old Mini Hex 1970s Propo set will go in it as a classic curio. I used it for years with the REP on the oyster ponds at Paglesham. Left, centre, right, centre, wiggle right, wiggle right and so on. The Taycol ate batteries! Martin

Deck by GrahamP74 Admiral   Posted: 15 days ago
I’ve fitted the deck and painted. I have also painted the internal shelves for the electrics and added my name and build details to one of the deck beams! The deck is not glued down yet. I have used plastic board and painted with a tile paint to seal.

Genesis 9000 by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Hi Peter very unusual problem with the switch😲 You could temporarily replace it with a bullet connector to continue trials. Glue one end down so that you can quickly unplug the battery one handed. OR: simply short circuit the switch and use the fuse as the 'switch'!? Boat looks a little heavy / tail heavy? Maybe shift some weight a little forward to give more stability? Happy trialling, cheers Doug 😎

Rudders and propeller by teejay Lieutenant   Posted: 27 days ago
Hi all for the second blog report on the schenllboot I am going to go over the rudder an propeller shaft assembly in more detail. The first stage was to make the rudders which were made of brass ,and having taken note of what has been said about the increase in size needed for the kit by other members I have increased the size of the rudders by 50% so that they have more effect and hopefully the boat will be more agile .I fitted 3mm treaded rod on to the rudder and in a 4mm flanged tube to reinforce the brass rod. The second stage was to make and fit 5mm flanged tube in the location for the rudders in the boat , these were made to be above the water line and will be sealed in place to reduce the possibility of leaks. These were fitted to a rudder platform inside the boat which was fitted to the kit moulding for the rubbing strip that runs the length on the boat and secured by making resin blocks which were fitted with computer extension nuts .which were then superglue in place to secure the rudder platform. The rudders were then fitted in place and held in position with the tiller collars which were made from 8mm rod and fitted the tiller arms and locked in place with 3mm computer screws and ni-lock nuts, a connecting plate was then fitted to connect the three tillers together, I also fitted rubberised washers to seal the rudder tubes. The third stage was to make the propeller supports. The centre support was a direct copy of the kit part made of brass and fitted to the kit with a plate and screws (this plate and the rudder plate were made from galvanised steel)and will sealed with resin after the I test the boat for leaks. The port and starboard supports were made by taking the kit parts and cutting them in have along the joint line or mould seam this gave me a template ,which I used to make cross-section segments but I did alter the template by increasing the boss diameter to 10mm and extending the support legs so that the finished support could be fitted through the hull (the picture of these show the mk1 version where I forgot to allow for the 4mm prop shaft which has a 6mm tube) any way the boss of these segments were drilled out with a 7mm drill and a length of 7mm brass tube fitted through the boss to assemble the segments, all of which were coated in soldering flux at this stage of the assembly which were riveted at both ends to hold it all together during soldering, after soldering the supports were then filed to the size and shape to resemble the kit parts as close as possible and fitted to the hull using a superglue and talcum power mix and then I cast resin around the extensions to secure the prop supports in place. The forth stage is the propeller shaft housing for the centre propeller housing I place a brass rod in a plastic straw and place in position in hull and using resin I sealed the hull with the rod in place this gave me a pilot hole for the centre prop shaft after I removed the brass rod. For the port and starboard shafts I used the kit parts which had hole place when assembled, this when I reinforced the housings ,the centre housing I glue 2mm of plasticard on each side and for the port and starboard I made a brass tube shroud which covered the housings which left gaps between the kit part and the brass which was filled by casting resin in the gap this increased the diameter to 10 mm so that there were little chance of breaking throw with the drill and finished these off by fill-in the outside with body filler and sanded to shape and finish . I then drilled through the pilot hole in the housings using very long extended drills and a wheel brace ( if I had use a power drill the heat would have melted the plastic of the kit and may have caused problems) I drill the shaft housings out 6mm them filed them out with 6mm file so that I could insert a length of 6mm brass tube. After all this was done I fitted a flanged bush made from 7mm tube and 2mm brass plate turned to 11mm to the ends or the propeller shaft housings. And now it is time I have to ask for some help could any one advise me on the length of propeller shafts , I know I can use a 300mm shaft for the centre shaft but port and starboard will have to be longer . and I also need advice on selecting the motors , I want to use 4mm prop shaft with 35mm propellers. Any opinions welcome.

Scudder by Grumpy1949 Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 29 days ago
Pontoon top surfaces skinned and sealed. Engine cowling epoxied and faired to spinner backplate. Donitello nose rough shaped out of polyester foam and glued inti position. Evil eyes an attempt at frivolity. Not sure how the windscreen will panout yet. The nose looks like the DC3 and DC4s i used to work on in the late 60s at Essendon Airport Melbourne

Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by hammer Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Tug man, as the splicing is taped over. Sized, I can save you a lot of time. Super glue the join, then cover with black heat shrink, Nylon cord will melt. But you should be ok. PS. Twist the joint then super glue. Wear latex gloves. Keep up the very good job. Proper job, they say down here.

Bristol pilot cutter mascotte by kmbcsecretary Admiral   Posted: 1 month ago
Hello all have got some more of the rigging points completed and had to re-do the sail control line after dropping my snips onto the line and it caught the edge and nicked it so had to be replaced as no doubt would have snapped once under strain. The ships boat is coming on nicely , have got the stern planked now and have made a start on cleaning up the glue overspill and sanding it down before fitting the floor and seats . Once finished I will be painting the outside of the hull to match the main hull and varnishing the inside with a yacht varnish.

Cabin windows again by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Having remade all the front cabin window frames I then decided to fit the acrylics into the opening (nice tight fit) all done! Or maybe not, someone then said how about “opening windows” it’s been done before. So would opening windows be a problem with water ingress? And would putting foam seals solve this problem? I’m not convinced. Having given the problem some days thought, how about going with the windows as planned which are now 1.5mm thick and inset into the surround. Then fitting an over window frame 1.0mm ply/plasticard with another thinner (1.0mm) acrylic window and hinging this above each window. This would solve the issue of water ingress and also give the appearance of opening front windows. Looking at how one other person approached this, it looks like the hinge was a brass tube across the majority of the window top and then a shorter piece the same dia tube at each end with an internal wire for rotation these short pieces are then fitted to the body of the inner window frame. These additional window frames can be added at a later stage and this doesn’t hinder the final finishing of the roof skins. So final fitting and adjustment and then pin and clamp in position the forward roof skins. When these are dry the window frames can be finally trimmed and then pinned into position and checked for fit then removed and then to each one apply the aliphatic glue and fit –pin and clamp in position