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>> Home > Tags > glue

glue
glue
Life Rings by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 4 days ago
The white metal fittings supplied with the kit are somewhat lacking in detail and some are overweight to say the least. I decided to produce some life rings to my specification I had tried to find suitable replacements on the web without success. So how to produce the ring part. I first tried with plywood but the finish achievable was not acceptable (can be seen in the pictures) so I then decided to use Bamboo (Ikea phone stand) for those who have followed from the start the same material as the grating on the foam tanks. First I cut some rough circles out of 10mm bamboo sheet and drilled a 10mm hole so it can be mounted on a 10mm screw mandrel. This allows the piece to machined on one side and then reversed and machined on the other side. The tool I used was ground with a 22 mm radius to produce the shape on one side of the ring and then when reversed and machined again the tool actually “parts off” the ring on the inner diameter leaving the ring free on the now remaining peg, the finish on the bamboo was good enough without any further sanding. The next step was to put a slot in the OD at 90degree intervals to hold the “rope” in position while the rope is bound in four places. The easiest way was to make a jig to hold the ring and to keep the rope in place while it’s glued into ring, it can then be removed and bound in four places each turn being super glued to keep it in place. Next job is to give a coat of sanding sealer that stiffens the rope and seals the wood. The rings are theoretically held to the cabin roof with clamp type brackets so again to ensure consistency I machined a piece with a suitable profile. I then cut radial slices to create individual brackets. The rings will actually be fastened to the cabin roof with 2 x 8BA bolts this is to enable them to be removed for painting of both the ring and the roof. At a later painting stage, I will be giving them two coats of grey primer and three coats of white, then hand painting the rope loops with red paint. The finished rings are much lighter and hopefully look more realistic.

Bending thin plywood by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
Slightly more comfortable - The bending is done simply by soaking in hot water for 10 - 15 mins and then forming around a suitable paint tin/circular object and left a couple of days to dry. The skins must be absolutely dry before fitting as further drying out when glued to the bulkheads will twist the whole hull.

Bending thin plywood by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 days ago
Gardener, I go out in the garden, where I have some large ex paint tins. I soak the ply in the water butt, then wedge it against the inside of the tin with a stick of bamboo, until the sun has dried it. By then it's nicely curved and can be glued to your frame members, you made while it was drying, out of 3mm ply. Make sure the top really IS dry and then weight down the structure while the glue is setting thoroughly. I've just made a long section of deck/hatch for my Chris Craft version of a Sea Hornet that way. Cheers, Martin

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 days ago
Hi Pete, Thanks 😊 Yep, I decided to stick with 4 lights cos tha's all I see on the original 'WYEFORCE'. Yep again! I do intend to modify the two lights on the stub mast; 1 yellow 'Towing' and 1 white 'Stern'. I will also fit a wheelhouse light. Decided to do it 'fluorescent' style by fitting 2 white 3mm LEDs in the ends of a long block of 5mm perspex. After that the 2 work-deck floodlights, lower cabin lights and 2 deck lamps 1 each side of the main cabin. I'll probably link the cabin and deck lights so that they all come on together. Now pondering how to build a miniature working diesel genny to power them all😁 Good luck with your divider! You will have more wires to squash in than I did so I doubt there's room. Have fun trying. I separated the wires quite easily by keeping all the negative legs of the LEDs (that's the leg going to the larger electrode in the diode) on one side and soldering them to the brass wire negative rail first. Then I took colour coded thin 'hook-up' wire to each LED in turn; working from the top down. Cut the LED leg to 1/4", stripped the hook-up wire back 1/4", twisted the wire strands together and tinned it. Tin the LED leg as well and bend it 90° down the mast. Then it's easy to solder the wire cleanly to the LED keeping it well away from any other wires. When all was connected, and tested OK, I stuck the wires down with thick gel super glue so they can't wander about. To fit the LEDs to the mast, I removed the brackets; removed the dummy lights with a razor saw, filed the mounting flat and drilled holes for the LED legs in them, using a 0.75mm drill bit in a pin chuck, and glued the LEDs on with gluper sue. Then I bent the leads 90° back towards the mast and drilled 0.75mm holes horizontally into the mast so I could literally 'plug' the lamp bracket complete with LED straight in and glue it down. Painted matt black the leads become invisible, as in 3rd pic above😉 Winch: at least your version of the model seems to HAVE a winch! Or where did those two pics come from? Mine ain't got nuffink, just a big 'ole at the back of the cabin😭 All the best, Doug 😎

Exciters/transducers by pmdevlin Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 6 days ago
Im not on here that much, so a little late picking this up. Are you talking about TT25 transducers like the ones Mrrcsound sell/ I suppose they all work the same, I've used these a lot, in planes mostly, and experimented with boats, so can offer some hands on advice. Firstly, you don't cut any holes to let sound out, as this isn't how they work. Its all about the vibrations. The centre ring is epoxied (that's the best way, they have to be permanent, but with some teasing they can be removed it required, rather than cyno) to the surface, which obviously needs to be flat. The thinner the material, the more sound, but its marginal, as the thinner you go, the less bass, or deeper tones. With planes, the best material by far is the epo foam, so when mounting into a ply or balsa plane they work best going to foam, then the ply, and the same will apply for a boat. 2-3mm is generally the optimum thickness. Remember, the area is going to vibrate, so use an area that can do this, the sides of a hull are ideal. The back of the transducers get hot, so don't cover the back, the heat has to dissipate and once secure, make sure the unit can move in and out, its easy to drip glue in the wrong place and the whole thing gets stuck, it wont vibrate now, so won't do the job. Also, its worth epoxying the transducer to 2mm foam, epo that the ready to fly planes works best, its close density, the stuff that packs white goods is poor as its a more open density and falls apart. Once you have this, you can move it around by just holding it against the hull to see where the best sound is. All this is relevant to the Mrrcsound transducers, I use a number of his sound units, so cant really comment on what you are using as I cant find that info on this thread (did a man read!) Here are a couple of my models to give you an idea👍 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXFvrkDl7ow&t=207s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_OITvPabFHY&t=165s so these are all Mrrcsound units, and both have two tt25 transducers either side ogf the hull and fuselage. With the Mrrcsound systems, you can use two tt25, if you want an additional two, then an aux amp is required hope that helps! Paul

LED Tug Mast Navigation Lights by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 days ago
Mornin' Pete (it is in Germany anyway!) I agree, there are lots of details and 'standard equipment' missing from the basic model. You can see the winch and Life Raft canister in one of the photos of the original I posted above. Re Mast wiring; don't fiddle about putting a divider in the mast. It'll just get in the way. Attached is a pic of my modified mast. I used a 0.5mm brass wire on the right-hand side for the earth return. Wire is better than rod cos it's flexible (can be pushed into the corner). I glued it in with gel Gluper Sue WHEN all connections were soldered and tested. The LEDs are standard domed lens types. I ground the tops flat and painted the tops with several coats of matt black until it was opaque. After testing I closed off the mast with some plasticard and fitted ladder rungs made of copper wire. I also added the missing antenna cables to the bottom of the VHF IMM antennas, 0.5mm brass wire. (Some time I'll also fit the missing GPS antenna and anemometer.) Then painted the mast matt black. I then turned my attention to the searchlight and red/green NAV lights. First I stripped the wheelhouse roof and painted it white as in the original. On my model it was grey🤔 Then I drilled out the searchlight to accept a 5mm Bright White LED. You won't have to do this cos you have a later version with lights, mine had none 😭 Then had to paint the searchlight with several coats of matt black. Otherwise it just glowed all round! Pics show construction stages and finished lighting effect. All wires inside the wheelhouse roof I super glued to the ceiling and ran them down inside the funnels (stacks to you guys across the pond!😉) ready for connection to a switch board in the hull. While I was at it I rubbed the false Southampton name off the cabin using a 1000 grit Tamiya sponge and am preparing inkjet printed decals with the correct Wyeforce name and logo. Have fun getting all lit up Pete,😁 Cheers, Doug 😎 PS Attached some pics showing the original 'Southampton' 😉 and making obvious what's missing on the model 🤔

Sails logo and new booms by Cozwhy Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 13 days ago
The sails need a little repair and Singers fabric glue really worked well. Still have fittings to add to main boom, but you get the idea. Thinking about how the plans rig the sheets. Will try it their way first, but looks like the servo is at a mechanical disadvantage. Plans say max wind is 10 mph! That’s way too low. Black booms are made from aluminum arrow with fittings made from brass sheet and copper wire. Reinforced keel to bulb connection with fiberglass cloth and West Systems epoxy.

Speranza 03 by muddy Admiral   Posted: 16 days ago
Hello Gerhard, and thank you for the interest. Unfortunately Speranza is on hold and no building has taken place since the last photo update. The reason being i foolishly did not follow protocol with the Spruce chine stringers, and fitted or attempted to fit them as a solid, instead of laminating. A short while after they were pinned and glued they sprang and cracked on the bow formers. This will be repairable with a laminate behind or inside the stringer then shape as drawing. At the moment i have near completion a Gentleman's Cruiser named Elizabeth.. There is a blog on her.. Speranza is a nice build and should be a good all weather sailor. If you are building her, good luck and please send in photographs.. Regards Muddy

Pilot Boat by MouldBuilder Captain   Posted: 18 days ago
Hi Mike. The bulkheads are all slotted as is the keel. The front of the keel is also located in a slot in the base board and so therefore all of the bulkheads are automatically held square in both directions. It has been glued and on a trial run, the skins fit well. I have been as careful as possible. The manufacturer has thought about assembly. The jig is not card. It is a strong sheet of 3mm Depron. If you see the picture above, you can see the slots for the bulkheads and the centre front slot for the keel. It does seem to keep everything in place very well.😊 I am going to try to fit the skins tomorrow. I wll report back if I don`t do myself an injury trying.🤓

Pilot Boat by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 18 days ago
Is there anything that holds the bulkheads at 90 degrees to the base? I assume you fastened this base card template flat to a wooden building board otherwise there is a danger that the bulkheads could be out of true hence my comment - bulkheads at 90 degrees. Its also important that it stays in the jig while the skins are applied. Is the structure already glued? as my comments may be too late

Mid Deck by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 19 days ago
Now I am in the swing of planking I may as well do all the remaining decks that need planking. Therefore, very much the same procedure as before with a mahogany border, followed by caulking the inside edges of the mahogany border, then cutting the planks roughly to length, and then finally trimming on the disc sander for an exact fit. When all he planks have been dry fitted, they can are removed and glued with aliphatic glue. A couple of days to completely dry then it’s on with the sanding before finishing with sanding sealer I marked all the nail holes using the marking tool I made. This is all on this deck until final finishing which will be done with all the other decks.

Pilot Boat by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
Agreed Mike, that was exactly my thought as studied the pics of frame arrangements👍 Pete, I hope you managed to get all frames fitted at right angles to the keel! To skin it I would fix the frame structure firmly to a build-board upside-down as Mike says. Make sure the keel is straight and then FIX THE BOTTOM SKINS FIRST making sure that they are flush to the keel and that the keel is straight and the frames not twisted. Leave overnight to set thoroughly. If you are having trouble fitting the skin round the bow and sticking the whole length then as a first stage glue the 'flat' bit aft. Leave to set overnight and then you can play with the 'bent' bits the next day without shifting what you have already done.😉 When the bottom skins are fixed file and sand to fit so you can fit the side skins smoothly and down over the bottom skin edges. Use the same technique for the side skins, stick the back end first if you ain't got enough hands handy to fiddle aft and bow on simultaneously😉 Use clamps if you can, e.g. the simple plastic X types or bulldog clips, whatever. Instead of Sellotape try aluminium Duct Tape. Cheers, Doug 😎

Pilot Boat by mturpin013 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 20 days ago
looking at the bulkheads I would suggest that the structure is meant to be built upside down on a building board. Each bulkhead should be fastened to a piece of 12mm sq timber then fasten to the base board at the appropriate spacing keeping them upright and square, then the keel can be glued in place followed by the chines keeping all the structure square and true. Just a thought. Ill post a picture of a similar vessel I am building at present in this way, but will be tomorrow.

Pilot Boat by MouldBuilder Captain   Posted: 20 days ago
Winter approaches again so what better than a new project,.......to go along with the other two yet to be completed. I have excuses. Honest!! This new one is a bit different again. No wood at all this time. It is the Aero-naut Pilot Boat. I thought it didn`t look too much of a task but I think I will have to re-assess as it is tricky in parts. I have assembled the hull frame, which although the parts are rather loose fitting until glued went ok. I have, however, stumbled slightly on the next stage, to fit the hull skins. The instructions suggest to cellotape them in place prior to glueing. Not as easy as it sounds as considerable bending of the parts is required to get them to fit, too much for the tape. Does anybody know of an easier approach please. The ABS is extremely difficult to hold in position when trying to tape it, which incidently, does not hold anyway. Should I warm up the skins or will this distort them and give a rippled finish. Any help here would be appreciated.🤓 I will continue with the refurbishment of the Patrol Torpedo Boat for now as I have been trying to manipulate the sides of the Pilot boat into place for hours, no, days!!.😡😤

A return to the hobby! by Brianaro Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 22 days ago
Hello. I have a soft spot for Sea Commander, I built one somewhere around 1964/5 when I was 13 with the help of my brother in law. I enjoyed the build and painting and buying fittings with my pocket money. I remember the long drying time of Cascamite wood glue! I think I had Frog petrol engine and Macgregor radio, all purchased from Roland Scot. After a couple of years I sold the boat and bought a new Moulton bicicle. I wish I still had both now