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>> Home > Tags > mabuchi

mabuchi
mabuchi
Graupner Elke HF 408 by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
Hi Allen Mabuchi no longer list details of your motor and as it is from an ex flyer chances are it has been cooked at some time in its life. I agree it is not easy to check for shorts but a reasonable meter will show any major problems. Your battery sounds fine. Pitch is often marked on the props near the boss but an explanation I have seen on the web: Pitch: theoretical distance the prop travels on each rotation. This is theoretical because water is not a solid medium and the prop slips. 10 to 30% is normal, the lower numbers are found only on hi-performance props, specially prepared. Constant Pitch: the pitch is the same across the entire propeller's working surface, or blade face. Progressive Pitch: the pitch is lower at the leading edge and increases progressively along the trailing edge. Consider a prop that runs in a liquid media with a constant pitch, the tip of the prop rotates faster than the hub. Conversely, if the angle at the tip is lower, the water speed on all prop surfaces will be the same. In this case, the performance is far better. Progressive pitch props offer better planning performance. So if you were to get some graph paper or paper with 1mm markings and set the prop on a shaft over the paper and measure the start point then rotate thro 360deg and measure the finish point this will give you the theoretical pitch. Over the years I have amassed a fair number of props and usually try various before I decide on the best for the model. Try what you have with the 6v battery (looks just right for the model) and see how it sails. From experience I know that this type of model is difficult to get going and all our club models have coarse pitch brass props. Speed will depend on the motor but with a geared motor you should be able to reduce the revs to give scale speed. I look forward to hearing how you progress in a couple of weeks.

Graupner Elke HF 408 by AllenA Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
Hi Dave and Doug. I love it when you two start chatting it's like tipping a cornucopia of knowledge all over the floor of my workshop. I found my original notes and the motor is a Mabuchi TD224 23. The shafts are: S.H.G Marine Miniature Propeller Shaft Assembly Stainless Steel Propeller Shaft assembly with Brass Outer Tube M2 Diameter Shafts An excellent range of miniature shaft and tube assemblies with Grade 303 Stainless Shafts and Hard Grade Brass outer Tubes. The outer tube diameter is 4mm, Shaft Diameter 2mm The Bearings are Oil / Water lubricated Acetyl material and are extremely hard wearing and quiet, The Shafts are Threaded at one end with an M2 Thread. The propellers are: RADIOACTIVE MA 3045 RC MODEL BOAT 3 BLADE 30MM PROPELLER M2 THREAD 2 OFF. As my Nimh battery is reading 8.09v so it's unlikely that there is a weak cell, I will recheck all the readings and be a little more precise to ensure I am not leading you on a wild goose chase. The biggest clue is that I have just measured the battery holder plate. The measurements are L130mm, H36mm and W65mm. Looks like the only battery that will fit is the PS-630 6V 3.0Ah 150mA 134(L) x 34(W) x 60(H)mm 0.7kg or similar. This looks right as it will probably take care of the ballast issue and it's no wonder my normal 6v battery wouldn't fit. It will be a couple of weeks before I can put her on the lake but at least the battery is ordered. Thanks again for all the info. One final thing... Can you tell me how to measure propeller pitch?

Graupner Elke HF 408 by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 day ago
BTW Allen, Dave's comments re 'old motors' go in the right direction but the basic thought and measurement technique are not quite right. There should never be ANY ohm meter reading between armature coils (i.e. motor supply connections) and case! Do by all means try this, but anything less than infinity, '---' on most digital meters, means a scrap motor😡 This test really requires an insulation test using what is commonly called a Mega meter. This has a crank generator which puts high voltage (ca 1000V+😲) across the unit under test. It measures the insulation resistance in millions of Ohms, hence the name Mega! For us modellers not a particularly useful or practical test! The most common form of deterioration in old motors is cracking and flaking of the insulating varnish of the armature windings. This does not normally cause shorts or spurious measurable resistance to the case but causes internal shorts in the windings thus reducing their resistance and therefore increasing the current they draw for a given voltage applied, as Dave indicated. There are two ways you can check this, if you have a decent Ohm meter, one less, one more accurate. The less accurate is done externally by measuring across the normal motor connections and thus include the resistance of the brushes and connections. Connect the meter where you normally connect the output from the ESC. Slowly rotate the motor so you can feel the slight 'click' as the motor moves from one winding to the next (or one magnetic pole to the next if you like😉) You should see a few Ohms resistance at each pole. Value depending on the quality of the carbon brushes. Better quality brushes (more copper content) = lower resistance. Note and compare each 'pole' reading. If one 'pole' reading is significantly lower than the others then that winding has an internal short😡 The motor may overheat in that winding, depending on how many wires are affected, and fail eventually. The more accurate method is to dismantle the motor and measure the winding resistances directly at the commutator, i.e. without the brushes in circuit. But this is only useful for nuts like me 😁 as in my 50 year old Taycol Target renovation. I was lucky no shorts and all windings same resistance + or - a gnat's whatsit!😊 Sooooo, to cut a long story sideways😉I think it's very unlikely your motor has any internal problems. I recently found one of the ancient Mabuchis I originally fitted in my HMS Hotspur destroyer 51 years ago, it still clattered along, bearings shot but electrically still OK 😊 Just take what you've got now down to the lake and give her a Go. If she looks right then she most probably is! As my German colleagues would say "Always a hand's width of water under your keel". Cheers Doug 😎 PS: "But trust me on the sunscreen" 😁

Graupner Elke HF 408 by AllenA Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
Hi Dave, Can't find the motor I have on the Mabuchi site. My guess it is quite old. I think it is a TD 224 that I picked up at a boot sale from a model plane enthusiast. So far I have run it on a 7.2v nimh so will change to 6v asap. I gave it full throttle in the bath and no sign of heat or fumes in battery, motor or esc. Thanks for the help. As you say a quick turn around the lake is in order. The fuse advised by Doug is now installed.

Graupner Elke HF 408 by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 2 days ago
Hi Allen Model has come along fine and should look good on the water. Interesting stats especially the stall current. This would rate the motor at 280 Watts with your 7.2v battery Do you know which type of 300 motor you have installed? Many were 6v max but they have versions that go to 24v. There should be markings on the case and you can check the specs at https://product. style='background-color:yellow;'>mabuchi-motor.com/search.html?method=4. I used two 12v versions in my Billings Coast Guard with 35 mm direct drive props on 12v and they were power hungry, drawing about 4amps each. With your reduction unit I would expect the current to be a lot less than the 6.77 amps you recorded. I agree with Doug's suggestion that you sail it and see. I would suggest a quick circle on the water and then check the motor temp.

Graupner Elke HF 408 by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
Hi Allen, I heartily agree Chinese specs should be taken with a generous pinch of salt 😉 But even a quoted 'peak 320A' ESC should be able to handle 100-150A which is probably 10 to 12 times what you will need for the little Mabuchi. Your Wattmeter is almost identical to mine👍 Connect battery to the 'Source' wires and 'Load' to the ESC and away you go. Do the test with the prop / motor under load, i.e. in the domestic test tank! Don't forget the Souwester!! 😉 I'll be surprised if the full ahead test is more than 10A. Have fun, Doug 😎 Primroses and daffs are only out in the Garden centres and supermarkets here, be another 4 weeks or so before much happens outside. 🤔Although my Winter Jasmine is still bravely blooming bright yellow 😊

Graupner Elke HF 408 by AllenA Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 3 days ago
Elke HF 408 now refitted. Running on a Mabuchi motor geared 2:1, 2mm shaft and 30mm 3 blade propeller. Still fiddling with the ballast but almost ready to sail. Yet to find a suitable fishing net to suit 1:36 scale. Control is via a 40mhz Hitec Ranger 3, Acoms receiver and Chinese 320A fan cooled ESC. As they would say in Cardiff she looks tidy. Many thanks to Tica/BRCarsten for photos of the plans.

Fast Patrol Launch by wunwinglo Chief Petty Officer   Posted: 4 months ago
This Fast Patrol Launch was originally built by me and my father in'62/3 It was my entry into marine modelling. Initially free-running with a tiny old school blue-cased Mabuchi, it was never 'fast' -as a result it was recomisioned several times over the years but remained dull. In 2013, it was refitted yet again but this time she got a nice potent brushless and a full array of lights. Now she goes very well here at the Oxford lake.

How do I find out the voltoge of my motor without it burning out by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Hi Chris I know of no easy way for you to determine the voltage. However motors do have a coil resistance value measured across the terminals. Also if you can see the coil windings a thick wire usually indicates a motor designed for high speed and current. A thinner wire may produce a motor with lower speed and less current and more tork. If you check the Graupner and look at the windings this may help you identify the other two. In my experience it's usually too low a voltage that's the problem resulting in slow revs and little if any tork. At the other end of the scale too high a voltage will result in very high revs and lots of sparks from the brushes. In this case if you continue to apply the volts you will damage the motor. Many electric drills were powered by motors rated at 9v and did indeed have an impeller cooling fan. That said Mabuchi and Johnson produced a vast range of motors all looking similar on the outside but wired very differently inside depending on the ultimate use. I suggest you try with progressively higher voltages and assess which is best for the two unknowns. Finally most motors are designed to work over a range of voltages so I usually measure both the upper and lower values so I can select the right motor for a particular model.

Re Sea Rover by Wingcoax by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Mine were all Ever-ready (which they weren't🤔) and I made a simple balsa battery box for them, also with brass strips for contacts. Hotspur's motors were also the rattly 6-12V Mabuchis. Seemed to me then that they made ALL e-motors! 😎

SEA ROVER by Wingcoax Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 5 months ago
[Score: 5/10] 30" SEA ROVER Capable of 3mph and a runtime of 20mins Single Propellor (3 Blade 30mm) Direct Drive to a Mabuchi (3 Blade) Powered by Lead Acid (6v) 2Amp/h Batteries Controlled Through N/A (5Amps) ESC - Comments: Model was Sea Rover, built about 50 years ago with my father on the living room floor. Power was a Mabuchi 6/12 volt running on two PJ996 lantern batteries or two 4.5v bell batteries wired in series. Well before R/C. Finally gave ot aay to neighbours son and switched to aircraft for 40 years. Now living in Portugal and glow fuel hard to get so changing back to water craft.

What motor have I got? by Dave M Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Hi Chris They are all based on 550 motors made by Mabuchi or Johnson. They were GP motors available in different configurations for specific purposes. You can look on data tables to find the exact specs if the motors still have visible markings. The Graupner is designed to run on 8.4volts but the motors can be wound to run on different voltages. I suspect the one with the fan is taken from an electric drill. They used to be popular with the fly boys pre brushless so they are available in large quantities at cheap prices. I suggest you run them with an ammeter connected to a 8.4 (approx) battery and see what current they draw. High current would be good for a fast runaround for 10 mins or so, low current will have more tork and be suitable for a scale cabin cruiser/tug etc. If you have two that draw roughly the same current at the same volts they might be suitable in a twin prop, provided they both rotate at the same speed. Dave

Pinkie Pie by Krampus Captain   Posted: 8 months ago
Model kit made on or about 1969 by defunct German firm Robbe based upon Chris Craft Roamer motor yachts of the era. Hull appears to be inspired on 1950s Chris Craft Constellation series. Model tried to emulate a 46 feet version. I got this one half-built and adapted as a gift for my child inspired in the "My Little Pony" characters. Approx. 1/20 scale. Authentic Chris Craft Roamer 46 measured 46 x 15 feet. It runs with a 4-bladed 40mm metal propeller, 320A 7.2V-16V ESC 30A constant, a NiMH 9.6v battery, and a Mabuchi 540 Motor.

Sea Hornet by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 9 months ago
That's exactly how my HMS Hotspur destroyer started! 👍 Free running with two rattly Mabuchis and a flat 4.5V dry cell battery! Granny and Grandad took pity and bought me a 6V 'Lantern' battery! Progress 😊 The Sea Scout my Dad built (which I'm now renovating) was very modern .. Taycol Target and 6V wet accumulator! And yes, that kit cost 35 bob, substantial chunk of a week's wages! Oh happy days .. Or ... !? Both had to wait another 20 years until I could afford RC, an Irvine / Sanwa Conquest FM6, sitting on my desk now (wonder where the antenna went?), it still works! 35Mhz!! Well what did I know?? 🤔 Anyway, my excuse is I originally bought it for the little Wren biplane I had built for my daughter, a German kit called Zaunkönig in German - literally 'Fence King'. Still have the plane, thinking of converting it from glow-plug to brushless. Micro servos and LiPos already purchased 😉 DHL just promised me that tomorrow the rest of the bits for the Sea Scout refit will arrive, including Royal Blue paint. 😊 So much to do - so little time 🤔 Happy building and happier sailing. Cheers Doug 😎

Couplings by Westquay Captain   Posted: 9 months ago
Isn't it funny how I used my Crash Tender 53 years ago with 27 meg R/C and never ever had any interference problems. Now the fashion victims all want those ugly little cans from Mabuchi or brushless, suddenly the lovely old Taycols are unusable. Rubbish. If modern R/C is that fussy we haven't moved on at all. Maybe because I have an unbroken link to the Taycol and the Crash Tender I see no reason to just give in and use modern stuff I detest. I have never been a fashion victim and I am not starting now. I think this and any other model boats forum and I have reached the limits to our mutual usefulness. I'm off to do things my way. Where I've had help, thanks. Otherwise?............ Martin