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>> Home > Tags > outlet

outlet
outlet
Smoke generator by jbkiwi Commander   Posted: 16 days ago
Have just made a prototype of a fan forced smoker which seems to be working well (despite breaking the heater coil by moving it while hot, - had it apart, broke wire, screw and washer repair, not quite as hot) I bought a couple of Heng Long smokers (for R/C tanks or cars) to play with, for $10 NZ each(or 5.3 Euros to you Northerners give or take a yen) from Bangood and just bought another from Ebay. There seem to be 2 different models, as one has a long coil with a lamp wick draped over it, which is sitting in the oil reservoir, the other has a small coil inside a piece of heat resistant woven tubing (as you might find insulating toaster/heater wiring etc) which acts as a wick and that also sits in cotton wool in the reservoir, (this seems to be the better of the two) Tip - don't fill the tank right up, only enough to soak the cotton, element should be just out of the oil. The wick loads the element. The better model seems to have a black top to the tank (also maybe either brown or black tank) and the other has a brown top and dirty brown tank. As with most of this stuff you won't know till you get it what it's going to be. What I did was remove the tank and cut off the pump tube just in front of the screw lugs (see black line in photo) then fitted the tank, and a 40x40x10 5v ESC fan (voltage controlled by a UBEC set to 5v on the jumpers) into a plastic electronics utility box from Jaycar (our local electronics and hobby store). I made up a double JST lead for the 2s 1800Mah Lipo and fired it up (using baby oil). It's pretty much silent and smokes well once it gets warmed up, ( starts smoking in about 5 seconds) You could control it (on/off volume) by either a remote on/off switch or perhaps a small cheap 10A brushed ESC. I would leave the fan running and control the element to avoid burning the element. The original pump tank inlet hole seems ok as is (approx 1.5mm) but you could enlarge it very slightly to get a better flow if you could find a better oil. At the electronics store they have proper smoke machine oil for $20 NZ per litre so I may have a look at that. The reason I went for the fan idea was that I found in std pump form, if I immersed a tube from the tank in water, it sucked water back into the tank. I was hoping it would pump smoke out of my HSL exhausts at water level alongside the cooling water but it would need a very light non return valve to do this. The fan seems to pump the smoke through 2mm ID silicone tube ok, so tubing of similar ID to the OD of the tank outlets should work well. These pumps in original form work pretty well for the price, and are cheap enough to keep a few for spare elements, the only thing is they are a bit noisy but in an 'engine sounding' way, (might add to the effect on a tug or work-boat though) What you have left after this mod is a very handy little geared motor with an eccentric output wheel which could be used for winches, radar and whirly bits of any description (see pic of motor leftover and original) To avoid burnout, these should be run on no more than a 2s (around 7.5v-(suggest 8v max with fan running) The other tank is going to work a lot better than this one but I'm not making a tug, just want a bit of exhaust smoke on start-up etc to go with the 2 sound units. Very cheap to make (around $25 NZ with pump, box, fan and UBEC all through Ebay, Aliexpress and Bangood (and local electronics store) If you wanted to run an ESC to control the smoke and you have no channels left to control it proportionally, you can always try using a second receiver bound to your TX, (if your TX will allow it,) power it and a brushed ESC (wired to the element) as normal and use the throttle channel to plug in your smoke control. This should work if you want more smoke as you accelerate or if you are using only 1 stick on a 2 stick TX you could use your 'elevator' stick pushed up (or a toggle switch if available) to start/stop the smoke (through the brushed ESC setup) . This setup weighs 100g (10g more than std) The quest for lots of smoke continues Will try to upload vid later and update progress.

Plumbing the water-cooling for the ESC by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 25 days ago
The HobbyKing ESC I’m using has the facility for water cooling and as it will be in an enclosed location without any free ventilation it seems sensible to utilise this feature. To keep the water circuit as short as possible I will put the pickup just behind the propeller and the exhaust on the stern but as the boat has a bulkhead just in front of the stern skin I need to make an access hole through it to allow me to secure the nut on the stern skin. I made a hole through the bulkhead large enough to get a socket on the nut and reinforced the hole with a ply plate, similarly I reinforced the inside of the stern skin where the outlet passes through it. When I was happy that the arrangement worked and I could attach the hoses and securing clips easily I glued and pinned the stern skin to the hull. The water pickup is a standard one that is readily available but it’s supplied with overly large and ugly fixing nuts, the inside one is of no consequence but I thought that the outer one needed smartening up so I put it on a threaded rod and locked it in place with another nut and put that into the chuck of a drill and used a file to re-shape the nut to a pleasing taper….who needs a lathe......😜 I had to reduce the height of the inner keel former as the pickup tube is not long enough to get a good fixing with the internal nut, as the inner keel is balsa I fitted a ply reinforcing plate to spread the load. The last ‘photo shows the location of the ESC, main battery fuse and receiver. The hoses will be secured to the ESC with spring clips throughout. I found that the silicone tube I use tends to kink rather easily if the radius of a bend is too small and I found it necessary to form a tight spring coil around the piece that loops the water back through the ESC to prevent this happening.

Internal wiring & bottom skins by robbob Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 1 month ago
Because I am keen to conceal as much of the wiring as possible I have decided to place the battery at the bow and the operational equipment at the stern, the engine on the original boat was central and covered with a soundproof box and this is convenient as the motor can be positioned and concealed in the same way. This means that some of the wires will have to run the full length of the boat and the easiest way to conceal them is to run them beneath the ‘box’ around which the hull is formed, and this needs to be done before the bottom skins are fitted. Holes were bored through the bulkhead formers under the port side of the hull and battery cables were run to the stern where the ESC will be and three motor wires from the ESC run to the centre, emerging near the motor position. For good measure I put in a servo cable and a separate draw wire just in case I needed to put more cabling in for any additional features, perhaps working navigation lights? Satisfied that I had all the cabling in place I was able to fit the bottom skins starting with the starboard side first. Before doing so I put a very slight 'hollow' in former F1 which should help blend the shape of the the hull where the ply skins meet the balsa blocks that will to be carved and shaped to form the bow. This can be seen in the last picture. The process of forming and fixing the skins is the same as for the side skins but in addition to the pins holding the skins in place I used some brown polythene ‘packing tape’ to pull the skins tightly against the bulkhead formers and strakes. The packing tape has a very high tensile strength and is ideal for this, and of course cheap and easy to remove. Once the aliphatic glue had set thoroughly overnight I removed the excess from the skins with a small block plane and finished them with my sanding plate. Before I fit the skin at the stern I will have to arrange the water cooling for the ESC, with the pickup just behind the prop and the outlet on the stern. I’ll cover that aspect in the next update.

Modellers Exhibition Midhurst by ads90 Commander   Posted: 1 month ago
The 37th Annual Modellers Exhibition will be held at The Grange Centre, Bepton Road, Midhurst, Sussex GU29 9HD on Sunday 10th February 2019. This is a great exhibition in the South where many Model Boat Clubs attend displaying a great array of their boats. For the train enthusiasts there is a large hall with fantastic displays and trade outlets.

Proboat Sonicwake by boaty Admiral   Posted: 2 months ago
Three weeks ago I got a Proboat Sonicwake deep V fast electric. This appears to be a replacement for their previous model Vorocity. Very interesting self righting method with a water tank on the port side, slots in the deck and a large exit point at the stern. Idea is that if it capsizes, water will enter through the slots and as it draws the boat under, the air trapped in the hull will self right it. If the boat is stationary in the water, it will list to port due to water entering through the stern outlet and when power is applied it will empty out. Bit scary to watch at first as I thought the boat was on its way to Davy Jones. I use waterproof marine clear tape to seal around the hatch ever time I use it. The quality of the hull raises a few concerns. This relates to its ABS construction as the vast majority of similar boats at that price are made of fibreglass which is much more rigid and would be more suitable for the high speeds. Makers claim it does 50 MPH plus on 6S lipos. The electrics however are excellent with the exception of the external quality of the Horizon Hobby STX2 TX which looks a bit "toyish". For myself, this is not relevant as I replace all my wheel TXs with the "stick type" and I found that the Futaba T2HR fulfils all requirements and worked well when I sailed the boat. I have not yet changed the stock prop for an Octura one, the latter works great on my Blackjack 29 with a noticeable increase in performance. The motor is a Dynamite Marine W.C brushless 1900 KV with a 120 amp W.C ESC . 😁😋 Boaty.

S.H.G Black tornado by thatsinkinfeelin18 Petty Officer   Posted: 4 months ago
hi got this off internet not eBay!!!! going to over the winter add meteor 40 engine propshaft n' tube were already fitted as was water scoop n' outlet ,rudder , trim tabs,a 2channel Acoms r/c receiver and and 2 servos no trans. but it did all work ( all in a gooy margerine tub possibly the best part of 40 yrs worth of GOO!!!! Hull /deck look to be in good condition! will keep u informed on "resto" over the winter months regards

Fairey Hunsman renovation part 4 by CB90 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
Pictures Rubbing down hull, Close ups of hull repairs Drill holes in transom for the exhaust pipes (water cooling outlets). Added spray rail to side of hull. Have found that I am having bad reactions to the fumes from Gorilla Glue.

Fairey Hunsman renovation part 2 by CB90 Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
The boat was free but I gave a small donation to the club,(Darlington & District Model Boat Club). Started by removing all hardware, motor mounts, prop shaft, rudder, water-scoops and outlets. Next fill the holes I have made, remove some excess wood. roughly sand down hull. Foam bow area, and glue crack in deck. Find a lot of damage to the fibreglass hull, large chips out of the gel coat and associated stress fractures, and other spider web cracks. Drimmel all crack lines and open up chips and dents, then fill with a filler. an experimental mix of P38 and Araldite, hope it works. Start planning drive options I have a number of items that I have brought and not used that will be put in this boat, otherwise they may never find a home. last picture shows drive option to use up components.

Brass bashin' Chris Craft deck fittings... by Westquay Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 5 months ago
If you want it to look like metal, use metal. That alclad is OK, but still looks like paint to me and having to do it in black first (and that coat has to be perfect apparently) is too much of a faff for me. Hammer, as you can see from the response (or lack of it) taking more pictures (never easy for my shit camera) would hardly be warranted and the description says it all really. I have a few more to take, or rather the wife can take em with her Klevafone for me. Filler and cap, exhaust outlet and windscreen supports have been added. Just the bear paw vent to go when I get a bit of 1/8th" through the post. I have 1/8th", but it's that horrible yellow gooey stuff, so I've splashed out on a small bit of CZ120, hard brass. Also called leaded, silicon or engravers' brass. MUCH better to cut and shape. The equivalent for rod, strip and section is CZ 121, extruded. These will all be available to buy once my chum has cast them in white metal and then you just have to burnish with a crewel needle (darning) and you have chrome (lacquer to taste). Martin

Emerald - "Round the Word" ocean racing yacht. by East-RN Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 6 months ago
Auto Bailout Modification. 1. I drilled small holes in the lower corners of the cockpit wells, opposite each other. These were then connected together with some small brass tube. This was to allow the water to flow from the front cockpit to the rear cockpit. (See pictures 1 and 2). 2. Two more holes were drilled in the rear cockpit, in the outer corners further aft. these were fitted with brass tube stubs. These were to take the plastic tube, which runs to the nozzles fitted into the hull (see picture 3 and 4). 3. To ensure the water would not flow into the boat, while stationary, the tubes were run through small eyelets on the under side of the deck(see picture 5). 4. Small holes were drilled in the hull and brass tubes were cut and bent, so that they would pass down through the hole in the hull, and lay flush against the hull, with the opening facing aft(see picture 6 and 9). 5. On the outer hull, the tube is built up, and covered in a cone shape, so the tube opening is the widest part of the cone and flush( see picture 7 & 8). 6. When the tubes are fitted to the stubs on the aft cockpit, and the cockpit secured in the yacht, the bale out is complete. Principle: While the boat is still and on an even keel, the cockpit floor is above the waterline, the tubes raise up to the deck level which prevents the water from flowing up and into the yacht. When the yacht starts to move under sail, the water flowing over the outlet nozzle is forced out by the cone, and creates a small vacuum at the nozzle opening, which draws any water in the cockpit through the tube and out through the nozzle. During a gust or strong winds, the yacht will heel over more. This will bring all the cockpit water to the lower side bailout tube, and be drawn out by the vacuum. When the yacht slows, and becomes even keeled, the cockpit will have been emptied. During heavy gusts, I found that the yacht will heel excessively, and if the waves are high enough, the cockpit will take some water over the deck. This is why I fitted the bailout device. So after a long sail in heavy weather, a long cruise back to shore on a broad reach and more even keel, will ensure the cockpit is dry. Happy Cruising

Warped wood by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 7 months ago
Hi Martin, Yes I'm very happy with it. 😊 Not the cheapest but very good. I use the whole range from Base coat Pore Filler (Sanding sealer) through matt, satin and full gloss varnishes. In both brushing tins, for small part brushing, and spray cans for the bigger stuff like hulls and decks. The cans don't reveal what the base is but the thinners is white spirit or any of the usual 'universal' substitutes. It's made in Holland, supposedly specially formulated specifically for model builders! But it's available all over the shop, I get mine here from Krick. Just Google Lord Nelson varnish and you'll find loads of outlets, and Hotels 🤔! For Sea Scout I used all spray; 2 base coat, 2 coats of satin varnish, as undercoat! Then 2 coats of Gloss varnish. Needless to say thin coats! And left to harden under a 300W halogen lamp😉 Lots of 'flatting' back in between culminating with 3000 wet & dry, wet with a little liquid soap. Final polish using two stage paint cutting / polishing paste from the Petrol Head world. See pics. Full details (including the bloopers😡) in my Sea Scout Build Blog. Have fun with it, cheers, Doug 😎 PS Shame about the Lupins😡, that hybrid sounds fantabulous! 😉 BTW: if you use the brushing stuff thin with 10 to 20% white spirit, otherwise you'll find, as I just did with base coat sealer on the deck of my PTB, that it takes yonks to get the brush marks out 😆

NAXOS - Fishing Boat by onetenor Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 8 months ago
Depending on what voltage you intend using governs what gearing you should use commensurate with size and weight of model and prop size , IE small boat and prop ,low voltage direct drive would do. As you go bigger then consider gearing.Bear in mind the torque produced by the drill. You could build a large boat with a fine turn of speed using that motor. The thing is there are so many possible variables you could experiment till the cows come home. The thing is how big a boat can you handle without putting your back out. LOL. If you remove the existing gear and replace it with one secured by grub screws and a "GearBox" with easily changed cogs you can achieve something suitable. You shouldn't need cooling .Remember the drill had none and your motor will have free space round it in the hull. If you decide you do want cooling annealed copper tubing can be wound round the can and one of the plastic tubes used to couple this to the scoop and the outlet. One way of making a scoop is a length of tubing with a slot cut in it and a cap soldered (or glued depending on material) on the end when in place under the hull the cutout will face forward. Preferably in the prop wash.Or buy a ready made scoop from a model shop. Much simpler as the mounting method will be incorporated in it already. Here is a page of suitable shops.--https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=model+boat+shops&npsic=0&r... Good luck. P.S. Join a club. Youll get loads of help from the other members.👍👍

NAXOS - Fishing Boat by Wingcoax Sub-Lieutenant   Posted: 8 months ago
Water scoop is normally sited just behind the prop and offset to enable the prop to push water up the scoop, the outlet is usually in the transom,although i have seen them mounted in the side.

Sanding down. by MouldBuilder Admiral   Posted: 10 months ago
Thanks Doug. I bought some primer but can use on another project. I will find the filler primer recommended. I bought sanding sealer also for when I am happy with the preperation. I have a 24litre tank compressor and special regulator and moisture bottle in the line. I also bought a second airbrush with a slightly larger jet. I know that you are in Germany, but would I find the acrylic paint in large quantities in a decorating shop? Professional paint outlet? Seen tiny pots in the modelling shop but I would need loads of those. 😊

Aerokits Patrol Torpedo Boat by RNinMunich Fleet Admiral!   Posted: 10 months ago
Hi MB, can only say what I have which works and I ain't set the house on fire yet 😉 Not surprisingly for someone living in Munich both mine are from German companies! Robbe Power peak Uni 7 and Graupner Unimat 14. There are later versions of both around nowadays but you can still find these on Amazon / Ebay etc. Both of them have automated programmes for various Lithium types, NiMH / NiCad (not recommended these days!) and SLAs. Robbe is now defunct and their Marine stuff taken over by Graupner and marketed as RoMarin! Pics also show the Balancer Adaptor Boards, necessary to connect the balancer cable of the battery. This ensures that each cell is equally charged 😊 I also included in the pics the little battery Capacity Testers I use. They cost around a tenner and are very useful for checking the capacity before a run or charging, as well as the voltage and capacity of each cell, which gives an indication of the battery condition. I found some duff cells with the tester in a few batteries I'd only just bought 😡 When looking for / buying a charger look also for a LiPo Safe bag to charge them in. E.g. LiPo Guard. Charger may cost 50 quid upwards depending on how many charging outlets you want and how many Bells & Whistles. But I get on well with these two 😉 I like the Robbe version cos I can charge two LiPos at the same time. Also in the pics are a few of the charging cables I made up with gold 4mm bullet plugs for the charger end and Tamiya and BEC (for my Plastic magic stuff!) at the batt end. Such adaptor cables are also available 'ready made' but I just like fiddlin' 😊 Hope this helps, Cheers Doug 😎 Nearly forgot! Can't say for sure what current your motor will draw cos I don't know all the other details, but a 40" boat will need some shove! So I wouldn't go below the 5000mAH if you want a half decent run time. A 40" boat can carry a bit of weight! And batt power is more useful than pure ballast 😉 Recommend a little Wattmeter to check the max current draw - see last pic. Basic theory! A fully charged 5000mAh (or 5AH) batt can theoretically deliver 5A for one hour, or 10A for half an hour and so on! Say your set up draws 20A with the 'pedal to the metal' then a 5000mAH batt will 'theoretically' last 15 minutes. Theoretically cos other factors are in play; initial charge state, temperature, internal resistance of the cells, cable losses etc. The latter is why I only use gold connectors! The higher the batt capacity the higher the price and weight. So suggest you start with the 5000 and see how (long) it goes. Then check the weights of higher capacity batts (and the bank account / management approval😉) Bon chance mon ami!